Sports

Stanford trio is honored for NCAA Silver Anniversary Award

 

Former Stanford standouts Jennifer Azzi and Mike Mussina have been announced as two of six former student-athletes selected as 2015 recipients of the prestigious NCAA Silver Anniversary Award.

The honor annually recognizes distinguished individuals on the 25th anniversary of the conclusion of their collegiate athletics careers while taking into account professional achievements.


Stanford is well-represented among this year's class, with Director of Athletics Bernard Muir also a recipient, recognized for his successful collegiate career at Brown.

Azzi led Stanford to two Pac-10 championships and the first NCAA championship in school history while being named the 1990 NCAA Final Four MVP. A four-year team captain and two-time Women's Basketball Coaches Association Kodak All-American, Azzi was named the Naismith Player of the Year and received the Wade Trophy and Honda-Broderick Award.

Azzi is a member of the Stanford University Hall of Fame and the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame. Azzi is in her fifth year as the women's basketball head coach at San Francisco and works as a WNBA International Ambassador and motivational speaker.

Mussina played three years at Stanford, compiling a 25-12 record with a 3.89 ERA. An All-American who competed in two College World Series championships, Mussina closed his eligibility with an outstanding season, including a 14-5 record and a 3.50 ERA, before being drafted by the Baltimore Orioles as the 20th overall pick in the first round of the Major League Baseball draft.

Mussina pitched for the Baltimore Orioles from 1991-2000, and in 2001 was signed by the New York Yankees, where he spent the last seven years of his career. During his career, Mussina posted one 20-win season, two 19-win seasons, three 18-win seasons and two 17-win seasons. In 1992, he led the majors in won-loss percentage (.783).

In 1995, Mussina led the American League in wins (19), fewest walks per nine innings pitched (2.03), and shutouts (4). In 1996, he led the American League in games started (36), and in 2000, led the league in innings pitched (237.2).

A five-time all-star and seven-time Gold Glove winner, Mussina set an American League record by winning at least 11 games in 17 consecutive seasons, and his consistency earned him six top-five finishes in the voting for the American League Cy Young Award.

In retirement, Mussina serves on the Little League International Board of Directors, helps with athletics programs at his local high school and operates a training camp for student-athletes in the area.

Muir was a four-year letter-winner who made his mark as leader of the Brown basketball program. Serving as team captain, Muir received the J. Richmond Fales Trophy, awarded to the team member who contributed the most to the sport at Brown through sportsmanship, performance and influence.

Muir also received the Stan Ward Award, presented to the player who in a quiet, unobtrusive way contributes the most to the team. Muir capped his eligibility by playing in all 26 games as both a junior and senior while earning a starting role in 21 of those games.

Muir went on to earn his master's degree from Ohio University and worked as an administrative assistant at Butler before being hired at Notre Dame as an associate athletics director for student welfare and development.

Muir continued to excel through the ranks of college athletics, working eight years for the NCAA on the Division I Men's Basketball Championship before being named athletics director at Georgetown in 2005. In 2009, he accepted a role as the athletics director at Delaware and in 2012 became the athletics director at Stanford.

In addition to his responsibilities at Stanford, Muir is a member of the Division I Men's Basketball Committee and volunteers as a board member with the Boys and Girls Club of the Peninsula.

— Stanford Athletics

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