News

Stanford demands anti-Prop. 37 ad be changed

'No On 37' ad shot on campus without university's permission

A political campaign opposing California's Proposition 37 has landed in hot water with Stanford University after the university said a political advertisement and campaign literature violated its policies.

The political ad features Dr. Henry Miller, a research fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution and a spokesman for the "No On 37" campaign. In the ad, Miller is on campus speaking against the proposition, which would require genetically altered plant and animal products to be labeled as such.

Both the ad and mailers sent by the campaign identify Miller as "M.D., Stanford University."

University spokeswoman Lisa Lapin said the ad violated university policy because it was shot on campus without the university's permission, it appeared to identify Miller as a physician at Stanford rather than a research fellow and because the ad could have been interpreted to show Stanford as having a position on the issue.

"Stanford doesn't take political positions, but individuals are allowed to," she said. "As a nonprofit educational institution, we don't take a position on candidates or ballot measures, and we don't approve of any advertising that gives impression that Stanford has a position or is giving support to an issue."

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Stanford ordered the television ad to be reshot off campus and to have the misidentification corrected in the ad and campaign mailers, although some of the mailers had already been sent out.

In a press release, the "Yes on 37" campaign stated that the misidentification of Miller also appeared in a brochure, but Lapin said she was not aware of any other appearance.

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Stanford demands anti-Prop. 37 ad be changed

'No On 37' ad shot on campus without university's permission

by / Palo Alto Weekly

Uploaded: Wed, Oct 17, 2012, 4:40 pm

A political campaign opposing California's Proposition 37 has landed in hot water with Stanford University after the university said a political advertisement and campaign literature violated its policies.

The political ad features Dr. Henry Miller, a research fellow at Stanford's Hoover Institution and a spokesman for the "No On 37" campaign. In the ad, Miller is on campus speaking against the proposition, which would require genetically altered plant and animal products to be labeled as such.

Both the ad and mailers sent by the campaign identify Miller as "M.D., Stanford University."

University spokeswoman Lisa Lapin said the ad violated university policy because it was shot on campus without the university's permission, it appeared to identify Miller as a physician at Stanford rather than a research fellow and because the ad could have been interpreted to show Stanford as having a position on the issue.

"Stanford doesn't take political positions, but individuals are allowed to," she said. "As a nonprofit educational institution, we don't take a position on candidates or ballot measures, and we don't approve of any advertising that gives impression that Stanford has a position or is giving support to an issue."

Stanford ordered the television ad to be reshot off campus and to have the misidentification corrected in the ad and campaign mailers, although some of the mailers had already been sent out.

In a press release, the "Yes on 37" campaign stated that the misidentification of Miller also appeared in a brochure, but Lapin said she was not aware of any other appearance.

Comments

resident
Stanford
on Oct 17, 2012 at 5:52 pm
resident, Stanford
on Oct 17, 2012 at 5:52 pm
Like this comment

Sounds like the anti-37 people are deliberately misleading people into believing that Mr. Miller is a practicing physician at a Stanford facility. Did Mr. Miller agree to this scam or did they just slap the label over his photo?


Dan
Hoover School
on Oct 17, 2012 at 8:10 pm
Dan, Hoover School
on Oct 17, 2012 at 8:10 pm
Like this comment

I hope Prop-37 passes, and I really hope people are not dumb enough to fall for the lies in these commercials.


rhetorical ?
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Oct 17, 2012 at 9:55 pm
rhetorical ?, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Oct 17, 2012 at 9:55 pm
Like this comment

I thought Hoover was conservative -- why wouldn't they want people to have the information and the marketplace to decide?


malarky
Stanford
on Oct 17, 2012 at 10:59 pm
malarky, Stanford
on Oct 17, 2012 at 10:59 pm
Like this comment

[Post removed by Palo Alto Online staff.]


Resident Ramona Street
Midtown
on Oct 17, 2012 at 11:01 pm
Resident Ramona Street, Midtown
on Oct 17, 2012 at 11:01 pm
Like this comment

Of course they don't want the consumer to be informed. Deception is the basis of American Marketing.

The US is one of the few countries in the world that has not gone metric because groceries will appear more expensive if listed in Kilos instead of pounds. Another example of corporate influence arresting real progress in this country.


Yes on Prop 37!
Stanford
on Oct 18, 2012 at 12:47 am
Yes on Prop 37!, Stanford
on Oct 18, 2012 at 12:47 am
Like this comment

GMOs in food must be labeled so we can make informed decisions about what we eat. Please take the time to watch the documentary "Genetic Roulette" (available for free online viewing through Nov. 6) and spread the message.

Web Link

Then, have a look at the opposition:

Web Link


Gary
Downtown North
on Oct 18, 2012 at 9:31 am
Gary, Downtown North
on Oct 18, 2012 at 9:31 am
Like this comment

"Deception is the basis of American Marketing"

and the Republican Party.

That's why Romney couldn't answer the debate question about how he is different from Bush.

He isn't.

Romney/Ryan = Bush/Cheney


Jan H.
Old Palo Alto
on Oct 19, 2012 at 11:58 pm
Jan H., Old Palo Alto
on Oct 19, 2012 at 11:58 pm
Like this comment

I beg to differ a little. Cheney was more intelligent than Ryan.


Name hidden
JLS Middle School

on Jun 5, 2017 at 12:37 pm
Name hidden, JLS Middle School

on Jun 5, 2017 at 12:37 pm

Due to repeated violations of our Terms of Use, comments from this poster are automatically removed. Why?


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