News

The ripples of Sept. 11

A decade after the Twin Towers fell, Palo Alto residents and city staff work through the lessons they've learned

Ten years ago, the Midpeninsula was jolted awake on a Tuesday by urgent phone calls and televised images no one could soon forget.

Over the next few hours of Sept. 11, 2001, we watched and listened, horrified, as hijacked planes nearly 3,000 miles away crashed in New York City, then Washington, D.C., and then Pennsylvania. When the North Tower of the World Trade Center collapsed at 10:28 a.m. EDT in a violent free fall of concrete, steel and fire, our collective innocence came crashing down with it.

Terrorism had struck U.S. soil.

Amid confusion and grief, people along the Midpeninsula responded as best they knew how.

Palo Alto police stepped up security at utilities facilities, City Hall and U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo's office, even as then-City Manager Frank Benest urged residents to stay calm.

To provide stability for the city's youth, schools remained open, attempting to keep students on their normal routines.

Flags were lowered to half staff. Most of Stanford Shopping Center closed. The normally bustling Palo Alto Airport ground to a standstill.

Shocked residents congregated, impromptu, to mourn victims, express their fears over missing loved ones and try to console one another.

The strangeness of the day unfolded. In the late morning, Menlo-Atherton High School students heard a roar and looked up to see an Air France plane being escorted by two fighter planes.

"It was kind of frightening, in a way, in that this is supposed to be a free country," Pam Wimberly, the M-A athletic director, said at the time.

People, motivated to help, quickly rallied. Nearly 1,000 showed up at the Stanford Blood Center offices in Palo Alto and Mountain View, overwhelming the staff. Going to donate blood "seemed like one small thing I could do," Leslie White, a mother of two, told the Weekly.

Religious institutions opened their doors to hold vigils for the lost, and the living. The next day, school children wrote thank-you letters to New York firefighters and police officers, decorated with red, white and blue hearts and American flags.

Though 10 years have passed, the ripples of Sept. 11 can still be felt.

The region's youth, who were just children in 2001, saw their views of the world shaped by Sept. 11, and today they speak of the lessons they learned about the fragility of life and security.

Menlo Park members of California Urban Search and Rescue Task Force 3, who aided in the World Trade Center recovery effort, are forever haunted by their experience -- but also proud of their participation.

A group of Palo Alto residents channeled their outrage into a determination to make sure their neighbors are prepared to survive a catastrophe. Those efforts have grown and continue today.

Likewise, law-enforcement staff sought new ways in the intervening years to work more effectively with other agencies and jurisdictions.

To honor the 3,000 victims who lost their lives, and to remember the many more survivors who bear the scars of that day, the Weekly invites readers to pause to reflect on what happened 10 years ago and how the tragedy, and our response to it, has changed our lives.

-- Jocelyn Dong

Palo Alto after 9/11

A decade later, residents and city staff focus on being prepared

by Gennady Sheyner

A week after the terrorist attacks on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon, then-Palo Alto Mayor Sandy Eakins publicly asked residents to "face the future unafraid."

"We are only beginning to fathom the staggering effect this will have on our country and the world," Eakins said at the City Council meeting.

Ten years later, these effects are easier to pinpoint. Sept. 11, 2001, continues to shape the city in subtle but palpable ways.

Police officers have greatly bolstered their capacity to share information with other law-enforcement agencies -- changes enabled by both cultural changes and Department of Homeland Security grants, which helped fund the technology that made this collaboration possible.

Palo Alto's tech-savvy businesses are now assisting the American war effort.

And "emergency preparedness" has become the leading buzzword among local neighborhood groups.

For Palo Alto Police and Interim Fire Chief Dennis Burns and the city's emergency responders, the event was a wake-up call -- a reminder that once unfathomable events are now part of the new reality. Burns said the attacks on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon forced Palo Alto to ask tough questions about its own capability to withstand terrorism.

"9/11 burned an image into our minds that these things can happen everywhere," Burns said.

The department had already been thinking about emergency response, thanks in large part to local disasters such as the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and the 1998 San Francisquito Creek flood, he said. But the attack stirred the community and created a greater sense of urgency in the department.

"I think 9/11 pushed us more, the council pushed us more and the community pushed us more," Burns said. "Internally, we tried to push ourselves and tried to be proactive. It's something we continue to do."

Burns said the department, like others across the nation, took advantage of the federal grants that proliferated after 9/11 to boost its information-sharing capabilities. The new tools include the COPLINK software, which allows Palo Alto police to instantly share information with other enforcement agencies. Before the software became available, Burns said, officers had to call other agencies to get certain information.

There's also the Northern California Regional Intelligence Center, a multi-jurisdiction agency in San Francisco that was set up shortly after 9/11. The center issues warnings about terrorist threats and allows federal, state, county and local agencies to easily share data.

City leaders have also invested $300,000 in a police mobile-command unit, a vehicle that will be a crucial communications hub in a disaster and is one of the most sophisticated in the Bay Area, according to the department. It has its own dispatch capabilities for emergencies, separate from those housed in the basement of City Hall.

Because of these initiatives and the increased emergency-response training that became the new normal after 9/11, the Palo Alto Police Department is much further along than it was 10 years ago in monitoring potential terrorist threats, Burns said.

"Everyone realizes that we're all in this together," Burns said. "The community and individuals, municipalities and state, local and federal officials -- we're all in this together."

While the Police Department focused on security and strengthened its cooperation with federal law-enforcement authorities, the Library Department found itself caught up in the impact of the Patriot Act, which the Congress passed in October 2001. The Patriot Act expanded the law-enforcement agencies' powers to search individuals' records, gather intelligence in the United States, detain immigrants and more.

In response, the Palo Alto Library changed its policies to protect its patrons' privacy from the potentially snooping eyes of law enforcement.

In 2003, the library began to issue written warnings to patrons who signed up for library cards warning them that previously private information about books checked out was no longer private. Records of book fines, once stored indefinitely, were to be purged within three weeks after the fine is paid. Patrons' computer-search history was to be swiftly deleted, as were questions directed to the reference desk.

The changes in the local libraries and police departments were symptomatic of the tension between national security and civil liberty that was playing out in communities across America post 9/11. Not everyone agreed with the library's new policies. Then-City Attorney Ariel Calonne called the newly adopted record-purging policy a "knee-jerk response," though he agreed with library staff's characterization of the Patriot Act as a heavy-handed wartime reaction.

The library's policies have evolved further over the past decade. Now that records are automatically purged, the library no longer issues written warnings to patrons about the Patriot Act. Advances in technology have made it easier for libraries to instantly delete information without the need for staff interaction, Library Director Monique le Conge said. These privacy protections have become part of the library culture everywhere, she said. These days, if someone calls or emails an information request, that information is destroyed as soon as the question is answered, le Conge said in an email.

"Most library activities now automatically include some type of privacy protection, and libraries automatically refer any specific law-enforcement requests to the City Attorney," she said.

As City Hall adjusted to the post-9/11 threats to security and civil liberty, a group of residents began thinking more broadly about the next disaster.

Then-Councilwoman Judy Kleinberg began calling people affiliated with local hospitals, neighborhood groups and major businesses. The goal, she said, was to bring together all the agencies and groups that would have to work together during a major emergency. More than 30 people showed up at the first meeting, representing just about every major city sector, she said.

"It was an enormous gathering involving everyone from Stanford Hospital to police and fire, to AT&T, people from the Stanford Research Park and people from the neighborhood groups," Kleinberg recalled. "None of those people had sat in the same room before. It was quite amazing."

The move toward better emergency preparedness proceeded in fits and starts over the following decade. Shortly after Kleinberg assembled the group, then Police Chief Lynne Johnson took over the group's coordination and, in 2003, turned it into an official organization called the Citizens Corps Council. The city-sponsored group, which included officials from American Red Cross and other organizations, held quarterly meetings to update each other -- but, according to Kleinberg, it didn't pursue the type of transformative initiatives she and others envisioned, including a database with contact information of every agency that would be involved in disaster response.

"It changed from an action-oriented group that was just trying to get people to be prepared and using various tools and strategies to make everyone aware who responders would be to a very small group sharing information," Kleinberg said. "That wasn't what it was supposed to be originally."

Now, Palo Alto's drive toward emergency preparedness has once again reignited. The City Council has for the past two years designated "emergency preparedness" as one of its five official priorities. This summer, the council put its budget where its mouth is and agreed to hire a new director to oversee the expanding Office of Emergency Services -- a high-level official who would serve as the maestro for the various grassroots groups that currently constitute the frontline of the city's emergency-preparedness operation. Activities that were once the purview of neighborhood leaders and concerned citizens are gradually becoming a major focus inside City Hall.

Mayor Sid Espinosa said the terrorist attack 10 years ago spurred many cities, including Palo Alto, to take a closer look at their disaster-preparedness efforts.

"9/11 got a lot of communities to start thinking about whether they are really ready for a natural disaster or an act of terrorism," Espinosa said. "I know our Police Department started looking at the safety of our buildings, and the neighborhood organizations in the city -- though they were more focused on natural disasters -- realized that any sort of event requiring mobilization in the community needs to be planned so that we can be prepared."

Businesses also began to adjust to the post-9/11 era. While established giants Lockheed Martin and Hewlett-Packard Co. continued to supply the U.S. military, smaller and leaner companies also opened shop to contribute to the military campaigns. Palantir Technology, a downtown startup that sprung into existence in 2004, has been using its data-gathering and sorting tools to map out organizational charts of terrorist suspects in Afghanistan and locations of improvised explosive devices in Iraq. Palantir was one of four Palo Alto companies -- along with HP, Attensity Corporation and Stellar Solutions -- listed by the Washington Post in its "Top Secret America" database, which tracks companies that assisted the federal government after 9/11.

"These are Palo Alto technology-based companies that saw the shift in business and responded," Espinosa said.

This Sunday, Palo Alto's current city leaders hope to recreate an atmosphere of inclusiveness, reflection and solidarity at a memorial ceremony at the Palo Alto Art Center. The event will feature flags, bagpipes and a moment of silence and reflection at 9:11 a.m.

People will then be able to stroll to Eleanor Pardee Park, where residents planted a grove of olive trees in honor of 9/11 victims shortly after the attacks.

The trees, which have since blossomed to heights exceeding 15 feet, stand in a ring behind a stone bearing a quote from George Washington's farewell address, encouraging Americans to, "Observe good faith and justice toward all nations. Cultivate peace and harmony with all."

Espinosa said Sept. 11 was a "transformative event for our country" even though it happened thousands of miles away.

"Part of patriotism is understanding what it means to be an American and coming together as a country," Espinosa said. "That's what happened in 9/11."

Comments

Like this comment
Posted by band
a resident of South of Midtown
on Sep 9, 2011 at 2:35 pm

what a pathetic country, attacking it's own citizens if they don't agree with endless wars!


Like this comment
Posted by Sam
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 9, 2011 at 4:20 pm

I find it dismaying that our city council and religious leaders and other opinion leaders did not support our attack against al qaeda. GWB led that attack, and he was successful...there has not been another major attack in a decade. The counterattack is not over yet, and it still needs to be supported. President Obama is continuing the attack, and we need to support him, as he does this.

It was also dismaying that our city leaders were silent when freedom of the press was attacked by al qaeda, as it threatened and attacked European jounalists. Shameful.

Basically, Palo Alto punted on 9-11. Pathetic.


Like this comment
Posted by Sharon
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 9, 2011 at 5:30 pm


The rational reality is-

Muslim extremists have been responsible for 1/50th of 1 percent of the homicides committed in the United States since 9/11.

We are wasting vast amounts of money on insignificant probability events.

In the US in the last 10 years about 5 million Americans have died painful and premature horrible deaths from smoking related illnesses-----5 million


Like this comment
Posted by Sam
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 9, 2011 at 5:50 pm

"We are wasting vast amounts of money on insignificant probability events."

Well then, why even bother with airport security? Sure, al qaeda will continue to hijack planes and fly them into buildings, but the death toll will be less than that from smoking. Feel lucky? Of course, smoking is much less deadly that breathing oxygen, since oxygen produces radicals that are extremely deadly to human beings. On the other hand, we need oxygen to live, before it kills us.

Why not just focus on al qaeda? I mean, even FDR focued on the evils of his time, yet he smoked cigarettes! He even dared to breathe oxygen!


Like this comment
Posted by Sharon
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 9, 2011 at 6:13 pm



The most rational and effective security measure re aircraft was hardening the cockpit doors and arming pilots.

--that should have been done decades ago

--it is effect and cost effective.

If that policy were in place there would have been no 9/11.

All the rest is mainly theater and boondoggle and a vast waste of money and time.

Profiling and random searches will deter the rest.

We could consider that every passenger wear a standard garment and standard slippers for high risk flights--everything else is packed and goes through security scanning and is transported in hardened luggage compartments. probably unneeded however.


Like this comment
Posted by profile kilt
a resident of Menlo Park
on Sep 9, 2011 at 6:20 pm

"Profiling and random searches will deter the rest."

Sure stopped the Oklahoma city bombing, didn't it.

Sharon continues her rant against Constitutionally protected freedoms.

Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.


Like this comment
Posted by Sam
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 9, 2011 at 6:38 pm

"The most rational and effective security measure re aircraft was hardening the cockpit doors and arming pilots."

Not a bad idea, but it won't work, if the enemy is willing to commit suicide with a shape charge. Then his other four conspirators crash through the breeched cockpit door and take over the plane.

Stopping al qaeda will take a sustained effort, and it will mean some loss of liberty. I don't like it, but I accept the necessity of it.


Like this comment
Posted by Wondering?
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Sep 9, 2011 at 6:55 pm

Wonder how many of the Council, and public safety officials, have actually read the 9/11 Commission Report:

Web Link

Just wondering?


Like this comment
Posted by @ Sam
a resident of Evergreen Park
on Sep 10, 2011 at 12:07 pm

Are you trying to say that the Iraq war was against Al Qaeda. You are lying or woefully misinformed. There was no Al Qaeda in Iraq until 2003. Saddam Hussein kept them in check.

The only area of Iraq were there was some Al Qaeda presence was Kurdistan, then a de facto independent part of the country thanks to the US protection of Kurdistan.

Enough lies.


Like this comment
Posted by Sam
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 10, 2011 at 3:31 pm

"Are you trying to say that the Iraq war was against Al Qaeda"

No, it was against Saddam. Saddam hated al qaeda, but he was not beyond using aq when it suited his purposes (enemy of my enemy). Saddam not only had WMD, but he used them against his own people.

The liberation of Iraq stands on its own. It has no direct connection with 9-11, although the mood after 9-11 probably made it easier to liberate Iraq. The Arab "spring" is an indirect result of the Iraq liberation.


Like this comment
Posted by Sammy
a resident of another community
on Sep 10, 2011 at 3:49 pm

"Saddam not only had WMD"

They turned the place upside down to try and prove it was okay to invade a country that never attacked us. All they found was some 10 year old gas shells he used on the Kurds.

He did not have WMD.

"The liberation of Iraq stands on its own." Especially with Iran! Saddam was the natural counterweight to Iran. The only winner with our invasion of a country that never attacked us?

Iran.

Well, also the Chinese since we borrowed the full cost of the war and put it on a credit card. Tax cuts in time of war? Patriotism.

Not.


Like this comment
Posted by Bob
a resident of Community Center
on Sep 10, 2011 at 4:23 pm

Sam....think back after 9/11. While residents starting flying flags, the City of Palo Alto did not. One resident, Dick Alexander offered to buy the city flags. It has no street flags,. Palo Alto does not fly flags on patriotic occasions - maybe one in CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, but that doesn't always happen either. Palo Alto should adopt Berkeley as a 'sister city'. At least tomorrow something is planned. And the libraries defying the Patriot Act for searching library records? Only in Palo Alto - and probably Berkeley.


Like this comment
Posted by Sammy
a resident of another community
on Sep 10, 2011 at 4:48 pm

The Patriot Act is patriotic in name only.


Like this comment
Posted by Sam
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 10, 2011 at 5:23 pm

"They turned the place upside down to try and prove it was okay to invade a country that never attacked us."

Saddam still had his program of WMD, even if he didn't have the stockpiles.

Saddam attacked one of our friends, Kuwait. We kicked his ass out of there. He tried to kill our former president (GHWB). He shot at our planes that were enforcing the no-fly zone. That is an attack on our country. Bill Clinton called for regime change in Iraq, but he was too tied up in Monica to do it, even if he had the guts to try it. GWB did it. Good for GWB.

Surely, we can all celebrate the demise of Saddam. And UBL. And al qaeda. And Gadaffi.


Like this comment
Posted by Wondering?
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Sep 10, 2011 at 7:12 pm

> He did not have WMD.

It's really hard to understand how someone who was (presumably) never in IRAQ can make such a claim, and expect to be taken seriously.

Cables in the Wikileaks dumps claim otherwise:

Web Link

There were weapons of mass destruction in Iraq after all.

The massive cache of almost 400,000 Iraq war documents released by the WikiLeaks Web site revealed that small amounts of chemical weapons were found in Iraq and continued to surface for years after the 2003 US invasion, Wired magazine reported.

The documents showed that US troops continued to find chemical weapons and labs for years after the invasion, including remnants of Saddam Hussein's chemical weapons arsenal -- most of which had been destroyed following the Gulf War.
--

And then there was the matter of Gerald Bull and his supergun. Bull believed that he could shoot small payloads (up to 100 pounds) into space for very little cost, using "gun" technology. Had he been successful, Sadam might have been able to shot small, virtually undetectable, bombs into orbit that could contain chemical, or biologic weapons.

Bull's achievements are following in a "Secrets of WWII" segment that is available on HULU:

Web Link

While Bull was killed in killed in 1990, and probably there was no one in the world that could have completed his work, no one knew that for certain before GWI. Come GWII, concerns about the "super gun" were perhaps not worth an invasion, that was only one delivery system. Missiles, and even supertankers, offered other delivery vehicles for whatever weapons systems that Sadam might have had.





Like this comment
Posted by Sammy
a resident of another community
on Sep 11, 2011 at 8:48 am

This sis the WMD we invaded for? Got 5000 Americans killed for? Spent trillions for?

"Also in 2004, troops discovered a chemical lab ***in a house*** in Fallujah during a battle with insurgents. A chemical cache was also found in the city."

Kuwait? 12 years before we invaded.

The "supergun"? The one the Israelis destroyed in the 80's, The guy was killed in 1990? "Secrets of WWII" ??!?!?!?!?!?

Shooting at no-fly-zone aircraft? Did they ever hit one? How many pilots died over a ten year operation? Uh-huh. Zero zip nada.

"It's really hard to understand how someone who was (presumably) never in IRAQ can make such a claim, and expect to be taken seriously."

Don't take ME seriously, even if I was there. Take FACTS seriously. You have none.

Multiple international inspection teams never found WMD. The occupying military never found WMD.

Even Dick Cheney, stovepiper extraordinaire, never even bothered to manufacture any phony claims of WMD after the unprovoked invasion.

The was no "smoking gun in the form of a mushroom cloud."

Cheney and Bush lied to America and you STILL believe them.

Pathetic.


Like this comment
Posted by Sam
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 11, 2011 at 12:14 pm

The Kuwait liberation was followed by a containment against Saddam. This meant air bases in Saudi Arabia...and this led to UBL. Saddam was a festering boil that needed to be lanced. That's why Bill Clinton called for regime change.

The proximal question, after 9-11, was: Will Saddam hand off a WMD weapon(s) to al qaeda? However, the long range issue was what to do with Saddam. GWB decided to kill him. Good job, GWB!

It is no coincidence that the liberation of Iraq was followed by the Iranian uprising, then the "Arab Spring". Freedom, even if very messy, is contagious.


Like this comment
Posted by behind
a resident of Palo Verde
on Sep 11, 2011 at 12:20 pm

look at our country,it is getting poorer and poorer,and our ordinary people suffer.


Like this comment
Posted by Sam
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 11, 2011 at 12:49 pm

"look at our country,it is getting poorer and poorer,and our ordinary people suffer."

Oridnary people are much more serious about our national security than they were on 9-10-01. Ironically, New York City, a very liberal bastion of misplaced tolerance, has grown very serious about national security, and is no longer so tolerant.

Our economy is down, do doubt, but that has very little to do with our military response, following 9-11. The environmentalist greens are largely to blame for our econominc decline. This, too, is ironic, because if we would develop our own resources, we would need less military presence to protect sea lanes, pipelines, drilling rigs, etc.; this might lead to more money to preserve some of our national and state parks.


Like this comment
Posted by bru
a resident of Crescent Park
on Sep 13, 2011 at 12:34 am

bru is a registered user.

OK, ordinary people are more concerned about security, but that has nothing to do with your thesis and ideas.

The war certainly had an effect on the economy, over 2 trillion dollars have been added to the debt ... that alone probably would have been manageable, but with the other piled on debt from tax cuts and other spending by the Bush administration has contributed probably 20-25% to the huge debt that we eventually have to crawl out from under and which makes it really painful and difficult to invest in stimulating the economy. There is no more room to borrow for emergencies, ergo, we are less able to react and less safe.

Then to blame the environmental movement for economic decline is strictly absurd. The US was defending our overseas "investments" for ourselves and the world long before there was an environmental movement. We do not use our own energy resources by choice, it is not because the greens do not allow oil drilling.

What is the point of making a billion dollars in oil when you have to spend a billion on drilling platforms, and them more on cleaning up the biggest spill in history, as well as considering the cost of the ruined tourist trade and fisheries?

And whatever the case world energy supplies come hot spots that the US would still have to be involved in ... it was us/US that developed the Arab oil countries mostly for our own benefits.


Like this comment
Posted by Sam
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 13, 2011 at 4:24 pm

"There is no more room to borrow for emergencies, ergo, we are less able to react and less safe."

Yes and no. There is not much room to borrow, but we can grow our way out of this mess, except that the environmentalists have stopped us from doing so. Our economic mess is the result of domestic overregulation, not the wars of liberatoin that we are fighting. A liberated Iraq is a huge boost to the world economy, as well as our own.


Like this comment
Posted by wrong
a resident of Southgate
on Sep 13, 2011 at 4:29 pm

you did not liberate china,now look at them,people there are happy living comfortablely.we need to learn lessons from history.


Like this comment
Posted by wrong
a resident of Southgate
on Sep 13, 2011 at 4:37 pm

i have seen chinese government secretly cleaning their corrupt officials,they listen to people's complaints,although they did not say anything on news paper,but they have changed practice for the better of the interests of people.i am not saying they are good,at least they know what needs to improve and doing it correctly.


Like this comment
Posted by Sammy
a resident of another community
on Sep 13, 2011 at 5:06 pm

Sam: "A liberated Iraq is a huge boost to the world economy, as well as our own. "

Besides the 5,000 Americans killed, and the trillions of dollars of additional US debt borrowed from China, do you have any facts to substantiate that statement?

= = = = = = =

Sam: "Our economic mess is the result of domestic overregulation" Wrong. Bush history proves that to be an absurd claim

Bush inherited a surplus from Clinton and within 8 years ran it into a trillion dollar deficit. What regulations (YOUR claim) did he put in that caused it? None.

It wasn't regulations that caused Bush to take a Clinton surplus to a Bush trillion dollar deficit, it was tax cuts for the wealthy, two unfunded wars, unfunded medicare part D, and Bush's growth of the government (DHS, etc...)

Bush took a $120 Billion SURPLUS from Clinton and made it into a Bush trillion dollar deficit - regulation had NOTHING to do with that.


Like this comment
Posted by Walter_E_Wallis
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 14, 2011 at 8:25 am

Walter_E_Wallis is a registered user.

Regulation had EVERYTHING to do with it. We are trading with the enemy because we cannot develop our own resources. If we are to take a "Whole World" approach, are we saying that Saudi drillers are better than our drillers? Cuban drillers safer than our drillers? Brazilian oil fields cleaner than ours?
The unwarranted increases in energy cost alone have decimated our industry and sapped our savings. The North Slope oil fields closed off because of fear they will upset some meese, even though moose herds increase around existing Alaskan oil fields. Any excuse is good enough. Reason takes a back seat to passion. The chic way to be is to oppose anything that does not directly affect us personally. There are negatives to anything, just emphasize them. Bah! Humbug!


Like this comment
Posted by Sammy
a resident of another community
on Sep 14, 2011 at 9:23 am

"Regulation had EVERYTHING to do with it. " Everything? Wrong.

Then explain how we had a booming economy with 23 million new jobs under Clinton, no major new regs under Bush, yet Bush took Clinton's surplus and ran it into trillion dollar deficit with 700,000 per month job loss.

Regs may be a tiny part of it, but the mess we're in now, by the very definition above have nothing to do with the change from a surplus to a deficit in so few years.

From 23 million new jobs to job losses of 700,000 per month under Bush.

Walter & Sam: What new regulations cost us a budget surplus turning into a trillion dollar deficit?

= = = = = = = = = = =

Sam: "A liberated Iraq is a huge boost to the world economy, as well as our own. "

Besides the 5,000 Americans killed, and the trillions of dollars of additional US debt borrowed from China, do you have any facts to substantiate that statement?


Like this comment
Posted by profile kilt
a resident of Menlo Park
on Sep 14, 2011 at 12:06 pm

Blaming this economic disaster on regulations that protect our air, water, worker safety, etc... is another baseless tea party talking point.

Bravo to Sammy for highlighting what Bush did before, during and after 9/11 to destroy our economy, with effectively the same regulation burden as Clinton.

bin Laden wanted to do the same to the American economy, Bush just did it better.

"...we had a booming economy with 23 million new jobs under Clinton, no major new regs under Bush, yet Bush took Clinton's surplus and ran it into trillion dollar deficit with 700,000 per month job loss"

Bush did a bin Ladin on us, and within a few months of 9/11 admitted he didn't bother with trying to kill bin Ladin. Web Link

"I don’t know where he is. I really just don’t spend that much time on him, to be honest with you."

That's our last republican president, only a short while after 9/11. A very different take on Fox's "hero" Bush.

Fox, back in late 2008, of course BLASTED Obama for supposedly waffling on his campaign promise to get bin Ladin. Shows the silliness and partisanship of fair and balanced Fox.

On the 10th anniversary of 9/11, we can thank one man for refusing to follow the republican path of ignoring bin Ladin.

We can thank one man for finally unleashing the wrath of the mighty American military to go after evil.

One man said "No" to years of Bush neglect and cowardice - "I really just don’t spend that much time on him, to be honest with you."

Thank you, President Obama, for standing up for America.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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