News

Palo Alto traffic disruptions expected tonight

Swarms of formal-clad bicyclists due on local streets to celebrate 'Formal Ride'

Smile and wave if you encounter a swarm of formal-clad bicyclists on Palo Alto streets tonight (Friday, May 20).

Police are warning people to avoid certain streets or risk "significant traffic delays" from a ride planned by a group that, in the past, has drawn at least 1,000 cyclists.

Tonight's "Formal Ride," planned by the group San Jose Bike Party, is encouraging formal wear and corsages for the ladies as riders stage from Sunnyvale and Mountain View for a loop around Stanford and Palo Alto. (See map)

Local streets that could be affected between 7:30 p.m. and midnight include El Camino Real, Park Boulevard, Serra Street on the Stanford campus, Palm Drive, University Avenue, Middlefield Road, Oregon Expressway, West Bayshore Road and Fabian Way.

"Motorists are advised to avoid those areas if possible," a Palo Alto Police Department advisory said.

Traffic officers will be present and police said they "do not anticipate any safety issues from the ride."

San Jose Bike Party describes itself as a group of bicycle enthusiasts who aim to "celebrate and build community in a monthly ride that must be experienced to be understood.

"We're one half political party, one half street party -- made up of all types of bicyclists and human-powered transportation advocates," the group said on its website.

Past rides -- with themes including mustache, Mardi Gras and psychedelic robot -- have attracted more than 2,000 riders, San Jose Bike Party said.

In guidelines published on its website, the group urges participants in its events to stay in the right lane, stop at red lights, right straight and predictably, "roll past conflict" and "ride sober."

A route map indicates tonight's party-goers will enter Palo Alto from Mountain View, heading north on El Camino. The route proceeds with a right on Ventura Avenue, then a left on Park Boulevard, circling past Peers Park and across El Camino into the Stanford campus.

The group will ride down Palm Drive back into Palo Alto, proceeding down University Avenue before making a right on Middlefield Road. The next turn is a left onto Oregon Expressway, followed by a right on West Bayshore and a left on East Charleston before a regrouping in the Costco parking lot.

Chris Kenrick

Comments

Like this comment
Posted by No-Right-To-The-Roads
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 20, 2011 at 10:07 am

> We're one half political party, one half street party

What gives any group of people, whether political, or just partiers, the right to force delays from early evening to midnight? There is no evidence of any permissions granted by each of the cities named. So, why aren't the police prepared to cite, at least, and perhaps arrest, those involved?

If some group wants access to a park, or even a public plaza, that sort of thing generally requires a permit, and generally, is issued. So why not the same thing for our city streets?

The police loose a lot of credibility by endorsing these kinds of activities, rather than enforcing the law.


Like this comment
Posted by Permit to Blog
a resident of Barron Park
on May 20, 2011 at 10:13 am

Some people should have to get a permit to blog!!

Police have no control over vehicles or bikes using public roadways. Parks are City property. Educate yourself a bit before spouting garbage.

They have done what they can which is wanr of delayes and sounds like they will be working the ride to deal with any issues.

Thats what we pay them to do, at least most of us.


Like this comment
Posted by what is traffic
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on May 20, 2011 at 10:27 am

If the bicyclists are obeying traffic laws, then they are traffic. They are not "disrupting traffic".


Like this comment
Posted by Share the Road
a resident of University South
on May 20, 2011 at 10:28 am

No-Right-To-The-Roads, you don't understand. Why the anger? Is your right to drive greater than a group's right to ride? Get over yourself...


Like this comment
Posted by Scott
a resident of Evergreen Park
on May 20, 2011 at 10:29 am

In response to No-Right-To-The-Roads, bicycles are considered vehicles and thus they can use the roadways just as cars do, no permits required. And, it's "lose", not "loose".


Like this comment
Posted by Observer
a resident of another community
on May 20, 2011 at 10:42 am

bicycles are vehicles with permission to use the bike lanes.

As traffic rises to to the level of events (whether traffic is the event itself or an offshoot suchas Stanford stadium on a football day) or further to the level of parades, then coordination is important: formal permits may be one of those tools for coordinating.


Like this comment
Posted by Too much traffic
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 20, 2011 at 10:54 am

Anyway this is a golden opportunity for the city to make money--the PA police should be out in force at every intersection. Any bike rider that does not obey traffic lights and stop signs should be stopped and cited. we do not want to have this turn into a SF style bike fiasco.

Also this number of bikes is too many--it will create a "too much traffic" situation.


Like this comment
Posted by joe
a resident of South of Midtown
on May 20, 2011 at 10:58 am

I'd think the sooner and smoother the cyclists are in/out of PA, the better. I think that's the police intent here.

However it's like an informal parade with people that seem to be enjoying themselves. I've not noticed any "political" aspect, so it doesn't bother me. In face it is actually pretty humorous and entertaining Friday night for 30-45 minutes.

But with some of our roads not having wide shoulders, bike lanes aren't always good for solo riders, much less 1-2k riders. Besides, I don't want any cyclists hitting parked cars either.

I just googled this:
Web Link

two highlights:

Parked Vehicles

Bicyclists should ride far enough away from parked vehicles to avoid being hit by an opening door.

When to Take the Traffic Lane

If there is no shoulder or bicycle lane and the traffic lane is narrow, ride closer to the center of the lane. This will prevent motorists from passing you when there is not enough room. You should also use the traffic lane when you are traveling at the same speed as the traffic around you. This will keep you out of motorists’ blind spots and reduce conflicts with right-turning traffic.


Like this comment
Posted by No-Right-To-The-Roads
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 20, 2011 at 11:02 am

> Police have no control over vehicles or bikes using
> public roadways

Really? Maybe you should check the vehicle code.

> If the bicyclists are obeying traffic laws, then they are traffic.
> They are not "disrupting traffic".

So why the warning of "significant delays"? Will they be running red lights? Or will they be honoring all of the lights between their starting point and their ending point?

Anyone who has paid attention to the the behavior of "Critical Mass" in San Francisco would see thugish behavior, and illegal actions on the roads. What gives them the right? Why will this group be any different?

> bicycles are vehicles with permission to use the bike lanes.

If they use the bike lanes, and following all the rules of the road--then they will be within their rights to use the roads.

Remember too, none of these people carry any kind of liability insurance, so any damage that they cause, such as being the reason for a vehicle's having to avoid them in the road, will result in someone else having to pay for their irresponsibility.

Football days at Stanford also create some delays for local traffic. Given that these events involve upwards of 100,000 people, involving a goodly number of people from Palo Alto/Menlo Park, the impact on the community is minimal. It's hard to believe that Stanford does not have full permission from the local police to use the streets to channel traffic intelligently. And, Stanford has the financial resources to be responsible for its actions. What about this group? Is there anyone who is "in charge", and prepared to deal with any financial problems this group causes?


Like this comment
Posted by Too much traffic
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 20, 2011 at 11:08 am

"Football days at Stanford also create some delays for local traffic."
Maybe. But they also put plenty of dollars into the city coffers---restaurants, shopping, hotels etc. That is what "Destination Palo Alto" is all about--this event is not--they do not pan to stop in Palo Alto.


Like this comment
Posted by Intent
a resident of another community
on May 20, 2011 at 11:09 am

I think the intent of the ride is to build community through biking - to encourage people to get off the sofa and on their bikes. The rides are intentionally planned during a time of day that there would be the least impact on traffic. And yes, please do cite those riders who do not obey the law--most of us who participate in Bike Party regularly don't like them either!!!


Like this comment
Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 20, 2011 at 11:13 am

I trust that the PAPD will be watching for drunk riders, not obeying traffic rules and bikes not having lights.

For anything other than obeying all these rules, they should have a permit. If they want to disobey stop signs and traffic lights like a parade does, then they need to have a permit.

Also, remember that there will be some of us who are just riding our bikes this evening as a means to get home or where we want to go.


Like this comment
Posted by OneluckyGal
a resident of Palo Alto Hills
on May 20, 2011 at 11:18 am

@ no-rights-to-the-roads
Cvc 21200.��(a) (�)1 A person riding a bicycle or operating a pedicab upon a highway has all the rights and is subject to all the provisions applicable to the driver of a vehicle by this division,

Bike party is not critical mass btw!

[Portion removed by Palo Alto Online staff].

Plus serious people are boring :P stop fighting the party an join perhaps you'll have a different outlook :)


Like this comment
Posted by Laura
a resident of Stanford
on May 20, 2011 at 11:21 am

I'm shocked at how many people seem to think bikes are only legally allowed to ride in bike lanes. This is simply false.


Like this comment
Posted by sanjosebikeblogdotcom
a resident of another community
on May 20, 2011 at 11:34 am

SJ Bike Party came thru PA/Stanford area on a similar route about a year ago with no incident that I know of(I was on that ride), I think there was 2000 plus people bicycling from all over the Bay Area, sure traffic got slowed up around downtown PA for about 45min to an hour as it passed through and most everyone was following the traffic laws, Bike Party has a strict mantra of following the rules of the road where ever it goes and it has nothing to do with critical mass, if this many people from all over the area are showing up to ride then it must be a good fun and positive event right?? Bike Party has never been shut down and has been going on every month for over 3 years, its covered almost every inch of road in the South Bay and more in this time span.


Like this comment
Posted by No-Right-To-The-Roads
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 20, 2011 at 11:44 am

> Cvc 21200. (a) ( )1 A person riding a bicycle or operating a pedicab
> upon a highway has all the rights and is subject to all the provisions
> applicable to the driver of a vehicle by this division,

So that means that they are subject to citizens arrest for breaking any traffic rules, such as stopping at stop signs, and running red lights.

By the way, cyclists are not required to have a driver's license, so they do not have to demonstrate any of the normal "good practices" that motor vehicle operators do. They also are not required to carry any liability insurance, or medical emergency insurance.

And it's also hard to believe that if bicycles began to disrupt traffic in any great way, that the legislature would hear enough from motorists to change any/all laws allowing bicycles into traffic with cars so that bicycles would no longer be allowed to disrupt traffic.

It's way past time to stop allowing cyclists to break the law ..


Like this comment
Posted by Richard
a resident of Midtown
on May 20, 2011 at 11:49 am

The issue of permits is a touchy one. Any permit requirement must be carefully designed to avoid infringing on constitutional rights to assemble and express free speech in the form of protests, marches, etc. The County of Santa Clara tried to pass a permit ordinance a couple of years ago and their first draft was so blatantly unconstitutional that they were quite embarrassed when they became aware of it. In the case of a gathering for political expression that is not planning to close roads you can only require a permit if you have good reasons to expect some kind of trouble such as violence, looting, massive littering, etc. It doesn't sound like this event will come anywhere close to qualifying on those grounds. Let them ride, and give them a friendly wave if you see them.


Like this comment
Posted by Bike rider
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 20, 2011 at 12:13 pm

@No-Right-To-The-Roads:
Your posts are so scary, I think I'll curtail my bike riding to avoid being hit by drivers with your attitude.


Like this comment
Posted by Park Blvd Resident
a resident of Ventura
on May 20, 2011 at 12:18 pm

We're looking forward to watching the formally dressed group go by.
Maybe we'll join the ride!

Joe: Thanks for the web link. It clearly states:

"MOTORISTS must look carefully for bicyclists before turning right, merging into bicycle lanes, and opening doors next to moving traffic. Respect the right-of-way of bicyclist because they are entitled to share the road with you."


Like this comment
Posted by No-Right-To-The-Roads
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on May 20, 2011 at 12:20 pm

> I think I'll curtail my bike riding to avoid being hit by drivers
> with your attitude.

Interesting. Expecting cyclists to act responsibly, and to expect the police to enforce the traffic laws where cyclists are concerned, is "scary".

What's "scary" is people's acceptance of a group of people taking over a highway for a "party". This happened a few years ago here in Palo Alto when a Nurses Union (if memory serves) took over a section of El Camino Real for a political rally, and the Palo Alto Police, nor the State Police (CHP) did any thing about it.

What's "scary" is so many people in this town unwilling to comply with the law, where bicycles are concerned.



Like this comment
Posted by Richard
a resident of Midtown
on May 20, 2011 at 12:59 pm

No-Right-To-The-Roads is completely out of touch with reality. Bicyclists do have a right to the roads, as do many other classes of users. The license and insurance requirements for motor vehicle operators are the exception, not the rule. There are no license or insurance requirements for bicyclists, pedestrians, skaters, skateboarders, scooter riders, equestrians, cross-country skiers, snowshoers, drivers of horse-drawn vehicles or dog sleds. Only motor vehicle operators are required to have a license and insurance because of the exceptional danger they present on the roads.

There is no appetite for increasing the requirements on bicyclists, which would have the effect of making it more expensive and difficult (and cost the state a lot of money to enforce). In fact, transportation policy at the national, state, county and local level is all going in the opposite direction and making efforts to encourage and accommodate non-motorized users of the roads. It is now widely recognized that this reduces costs and increases public health. This is called the "Complete Streets" policy which requires that the needs of non-motorized road users of all ages and abilities be considered along with those of motor vehicle operators. For example, see this link:
Web Link

This is Caltrans' 2008 Complete Streets policy directive. They are currently in the process of revising all of their highway design manuals to comply with this directive.


Like this comment
Posted by Robbie
a resident of Ventura
on May 20, 2011 at 1:02 pm

Thank you, Richard. I, for one, welcome our new non-motorized overlords.


Like this comment
Posted by sue
a resident of Barron Park
on May 20, 2011 at 1:09 pm

What is "scary" is the number of cyclists who blow through stop signs, don't use hand signals for turns, & generally rely on motorists to give way to cyclists traffic law offenses, to which they are subject. Also scary are the cyclists who ride on El Camino after dark without either lights or helmets. Some don't even have rear reflectors!

I hope this group observes stop signs & traffic lights. Police certainly have the authority to see that they do.


Like this comment
Posted by Carl
a resident of Palo Verde
on May 20, 2011 at 2:17 pm

Geesh! Some people (@No-Right-To-The-Roads in particular) are really angry at some one or some thing.
Yes, there are irresponsible persons of all persuasions - automobile drivers, motorcycle drivers, bicyclists, pedestrians, (I could go on). However, our experience with them should not let us classify all persons of that persuasion as irresponsible. Any time a large group of lawful riders assemble in some area *for whatever reason*, then you should expect there to be delays. The fact that this is a group of bicyclists who enjoy going for a ride (dressing up this time) is no different than those who drive to Stanford for a football game, or Stanford Shopping Center for a sale, or to the Mt. View amphitheather for a concert, or (even) driving to work in the morning. The mass of people/cars attending those events can inconvienience persons who are not participating in those events, or who even disagree with the reason for those events. But that's life. That is what living in the U.S.A. is (or should be) all about. Recognizing, no, celebrating individual freedom and having tolerance for others' beliefs/actions when they are not your own.


Like this comment
Posted by Bike Rider
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on May 20, 2011 at 2:40 pm

Carl is right. There is a lot of anger out there. My issue with motorists angry at cyclists is the inherent imbalance in risk. A road rage encounter might lead to a scratched bumper for a motorist but for a cyclist it's a matter of life and death.


Like this comment
Posted by Lighten Up
a resident of Evergreen Park
on May 20, 2011 at 2:45 pm

Once again, I'm astounded at the humorlessness on these discussion boards. No-Right-To-The-Roads sounds like someone who seriously needs to lighten up (might I suggest a relaxing bike ride through our beautiful city?)

This all sounds pretty fantastic. I live along the route and received an informational call from the city last night - organizers and police seem to be on top of this. I'm looking forward to getting all my errands done early and then coming home to fire up the grill, crack open a beer and enjoy the fun bike party parading down the street. What a perfect way to end the week!


Like this comment
Posted by Andrew Boone
a resident of Crescent Park
on May 20, 2011 at 3:30 pm

Can't wait for the ride - just 4 hours to go!

Here's the route sheet with maps if you want to join: Web Link

One of the regroups will be at the Oval at Stanford University. That will be awesome - the Oval full of bikes!

And then we'll ride down Middlefield and Oregon Exprwy - one of the very few occasions that those roads are ever safe to bike on. Don't miss out!


Like this comment
Posted by dvq
a resident of another community
on May 20, 2011 at 4:24 pm

@No-Right-To-The-Roads Regarding the citizen's arrest comment -- be sure to check with your county's laws first and be very careful if you ever do attempt a citizen's arrest (hopefully not for something as positive as bike party). The legal risk in a citizen's arrest is usually far too great.


Like this comment
Posted by Hulkamania
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on May 20, 2011 at 4:58 pm

No-Right-To-The-Roads sez, "So that means that they are subject to citizens arrest for breaking any traffic rules..."
In addition to dvq's excellent response regarding legality of a citizen's arrest, No-Right-To-The-Roads should also be aware that the arrestee has the right to fight back. A buffed out rider may take exception to No-Right-To-The-Roads bleats and perform what's known in the WWE as a smack down on his noggin.

Hopefully, No-Right-To-The-Roads will post his location so we can watch him at work.


Like this comment
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of East Palo Alto
on May 20, 2011 at 5:35 pm

Best reason recently to NOT spend $$ in PA tonight. I hate these types of events because of the smugness that accompanies. Guess what? Not everyone has a bike, knows how to ride, wants to ride at night or ride w/thousands of others. Ugh.

Big diff between this & football traffic? It's much easier to pinpoint football traffic patterns than for this event.


Like this comment
Posted by ES
a resident of Greenmeadow
on May 20, 2011 at 6:04 pm

HAVE FUN, BIKE PARTY! Be safe, and don't let the killjoys get you down.


Like this comment
Posted by Palo Alto Rider
a resident of Palo Alto Hills
on May 20, 2011 at 6:57 pm

To those that try to assert that they in their vehicles own the road. I pay more than my share to the city coffers in property taxes and I fully support this event. [Portion removed by Palo Alto Online staff.] Look up the rights of the roads...Bike belong. And BTW, more cars break traffic laws than bikes. People are having a fun time...celebrating a bike ride. It's just one night. Sheesh!


Like this comment
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of East Palo Alto
on May 20, 2011 at 7:08 pm

[Post removed by Palo Alto Online staff.]


Like this comment
Posted by Outside Observer
a resident of another community
on May 20, 2011 at 9:02 pm

Bicycle laws have several things in common with the old Jim Crow laws of the deep south. Both are discriminatory against legitimate activities. For Jim Crow, by race, and in bicycle laws by motor vehicle. Additionally, the bicycle laws are contrary to the specific purpose and engineering of roadways. The roads are designed for motor vehicles. Period. They further their absurdity in that all other public conveyance facilities are properly designated by design. I can't ride my motorcycle on the side walks, despite the fact that it is physically possible. The reasons against it are obvious, as are the reasons to limit roadways to the motor vehicles for which they were designed.

In time, just like Jim Crow, these bicycle laws will pass. It may take demonstrations like it did in the south, or they may go away when the bicycle fad is over, or they may go away when the death and injury rate for bicyclists can no longer be concealed.

Oh, and there is one more similarity between Jim Crow and the bicycle laws. Both of them were brought to you by the same people. The democrats.


Like this comment
Posted by Donald
a resident of South of Midtown
on May 20, 2011 at 9:54 pm

So did chaos reign tonight in Palo Alto as a result of these terrible people, or was it a lot of fuss over nothing?


Like this comment
Posted by student
a resident of Stanford
on May 20, 2011 at 10:23 pm

The bikers have gone through the Stanford campus yelling racist and homophobic slurs at students, riding their bikes on to pedestrians on the sidewalk and scaring people.

Don't these pigs need to get a permission for an organized event? Why isn't there a single police officer around?

Many of them do not have bike lights while riding at night.
Many of them didn't bother to even slow down before crossing the stop signs.
Few of them were riding their bikes on the sidewalk, harassing pedestrians.


Like this comment
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of East Palo Alto
on May 20, 2011 at 11:24 pm

So few bike helmets in the pics I saw. Moronic.

student, you're kidding, right? Except I also didn't see any cops on campus & some of what you describe is how cyclists on campus behave all the time. Almost nailed one tonight, sans light, helmet & reflectors, ran 2 stop signs. Organ donor pays how much in tuition?


Like this comment
Posted by worry mom
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on May 20, 2011 at 11:46 pm

What they come periodically? I just don't feel safe living here anymore.


Like this comment
Posted by student
a resident of Stanford
on May 20, 2011 at 11:56 pm

Hmmm
student, you're kidding, right? Except I also didn't see any cops on campus & some of what you describe is how cyclists on campus behave all the time.

@Hmmm

Running stop signs and not having lights, helmets, yes, that's pretty common on campus.

But riding bikes ONTO people on the sidewalk on purpose and the slurs and harassment, not. These bikers tonight were more like a gang. They were riding their bikes at high speed onto pedestrians and yelling slurs like "faggot" and "pussy".

What's next? Are they going to beat and rape people?

These were NOT some peaceful folk enjoying a beautiful night on their bikes, these were young men out on the street looking for trouble and harassing people.


Like this comment
Posted by observer of two wheel mob rule
a resident of Mountain View
on May 21, 2011 at 1:35 am

irritating, loud, drunk, urinating fools, did I mention urinating!


Like this comment
Posted by Ed
a resident of Greenmeadow
on May 21, 2011 at 8:53 am

It looked like a lot of fun last night. As a motorist I was delayed maybe a minute or two. Definitely will join the party next time!


Like this comment
Posted by Bart Anderson
a resident of College Terrace
on May 21, 2011 at 10:17 am

I rode with the Bike Party for about 14 miles, through Stanford and Palo Alto.

Quite a diverse crowd. Somebody on a unicycle, another on a Penny Farthing, a big percentage of the rides in costume. A number of people looked like they hadn't been on bikes much -- and they seemed to be enjoying themselves.

It gives you an idea of how much fun will be when our cities are as bicycle friendly as Denmark and the Netherlands.

The San Francisco Bay Guardian had a good article giving some background on the Bike Party:
Web Link


Like this comment
Posted by RS
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on May 21, 2011 at 10:30 am

Looks like a bunch of fun, glad it got all this publicity, maybe next time I'll ride too.


Like this comment
Posted by Hulkamania
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on May 21, 2011 at 12:17 pm

"The bikers have gone through the Stanford campus yelling racist and homophobic slurs at students, riding their bikes on to pedestrians on the sidewalk and scaring people."

Are you sure it wasn't a bunch of Omega Theta Pis?


Like this comment
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of East Palo Alto
on May 21, 2011 at 5:27 pm

student, I am sorry I doubted you - I thought you were being sarcastic in your post. It sounds like some of the riders were not the usual types. It sounds truly awful! That's why the cops should've been available - to make it safe for everyone.

I was really not impressed w/what I saw on the news - not that a bike party shouldnt' be fun & creative, but the lack of helmets w/this many riding on paved roads? Totally stupid.


Like this comment
Posted by Anna
a resident of Midtown
on May 21, 2011 at 9:55 pm

Sounds as if they were another group of bicyclists whose main objective is to "annoy the grownups." Any time I get a recorded call from the Palo Alto police warning me that I won't be allowed to drive around my own city in the evening, I can't help but think what they are doing is wrong and inconsiderate. Why is that a good thing or a good attitude?

If there were extra police on duty that evening because of a large group of what amounted to a parade, who pays for that in these hard times? What necessary city services do we do without to cover that cost? Can we vote?

If a bunch of "partiers" came through town on motorcycles instead of bicycles, would everybody think that was cute? Or would it be too blue collar? Blocking traffic is blocking traffic, and the bikers should have at least gotten a permit and paid for any costs.


Like this comment
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of East Palo Alto
on May 21, 2011 at 11:03 pm

Anna, if a bunch of partiers came through town on motorcycles, I'd hope a young, handsome, rebellious Marlon Brando was w/them.

Female dancer: "Hey, Johnny, What are you rebelling against?"

Johnny: "What've you got?"

Oh, wait, that does happen - in Hollister, the yearly motorcycle party - bigger carbon footprint, fewer amateurs.


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

Mountain View's Hangen Szechuan to close after 25 years
By Elena Kadvany | 1 comment | 1,899 views

Populism: A response to the failure of the elites: Palo Alto edition
By Douglas Moran | 12 comments | 1,845 views

Let's Talk Internships
By John Raftrey and Lori McCormick | 1 comment | 1,452 views

Couples: Sex and Connection (Chicken or Egg?)
By Chandrama Anderson | 1 comment | 1,254 views

Zucchini Takeover
By Laura Stec | 5 comments | 990 views