News

Man, 18, arrested for Palo Alto carjacking

Poasi Toliseli arrested in Oroville for November armed carjacking

Officers have arrested a man suspected in an armed carjacking in Palo Alto last November, according to police.

Police believe that 18-year-old Poasi Toliseli is responsible for an armed carjacking that occurred in the 3300 block of Park Boulevard on Nov. 13.

East Palo Alto police chased Toliseli in the stolen car immediately following the theft, but were unable to catch him after he exited the vehicle and fled on foot. The car was recovered and returned to the victims.

Palo Alto police detectives continued to investigate the case and arrested Toliseli on Feb. 10 at Butte College, located in Oroville. He is being held in Santa Clara County Jail on suspicion of carjacking, police said.

— Bay City News Service

Comments

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Posted by Bob
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 25, 2011 at 10:20 am

Not many details here .. like where the person arrested was living at the time of the incident here in PA, and if fingerprints on the vehicle were the only clues used by the PA police to ultimately identify and locate this fellow.

In all likelihood, a lot of inter-agency cooperation was required to close this case. It would be great if the local police agencies were to recognize the need to better integrate their information resources, at least, so that the time to close these sorts of investigations can take less time.

The article does not state if the young man was a student at the college where he was supposed to have been arrested. But this does beg the question about requiring fingerprints being taken by all publicly-sponsored educational institutions and those files being available for searching by police for these sorts of crimes. With so many crimes being caused by young men in the 14-27 year age range, it would make sense to have these people's fingerprints on file to help the police close these cases as quickly as possible.


Like this comment
Posted by hard liner
a resident of Adobe-Meadow
on Feb 25, 2011 at 10:40 am

To Paly and Gunn fingerprint all their students? If not, why not?


Like this comment
Posted by anti finger print
a resident of another community
on Feb 25, 2011 at 9:13 pm

Finger printing students? Lets be real. Firstly feasibility, do you know the associated costs of doing something on that level? Did you all hear about California's ridiculous ammunition law that would require fingerprinting and the millions of dollars needed? California's just love to throw money they don't have at problems they need to fix the right way.

I have been finger printed numerous times and my records are all on file for every federal and state law enforcement agency to look up. Then again that was the price I paid for the benefits I enjoy. (Concealed weapons permit) and some other various state and federal permits.

That is the price I paid to gain such privileges, had I not been awarded those privileges and weighted the benefits with the risks, I would have never given up my info to the man. If its not in fine print on the constitution somewhere (bad sense of humor) you can bet, anyone who wants to try to push mass fingerprinting of minors for attending public schools, is going to be hit with some pretty heavy opposition from all of us that actually enjoy having freedom.


Like this comment
Posted by Hmmm
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Feb 26, 2011 at 2:08 pm

I agree, anti fingerprint. I haven't been fingerprinted for what I consider privileges, but for employment & volunteer work w/minors. If I was a parent of a minor, I'd want them fingerprinted for identification but not for ID for crimes committed - what parent would?


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

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