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Stanford study: Kids with a sense of humor

 

It's not just about the laugh track. Children are needed to watch funny films for a study of humor at Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

It is the first such study of how children's brains change as their sense of humor matures. As part of the project, the researchers are examining how gender and temperament affect the development of humor pathways in the brain.

The researchers are examining how the neural pathways that encode the sense of humor develop in children's brains.

The scientists need brother-sister pairs aged six to 12 to watch short, funny film clips while having their brains scanned with magnetic resonance imaging. To participate, siblings must be no more than 2.5 years apart in age and must not have implanted metal, such as orthodontic braces.

Participants will have one home visit from the researchers and make two visits to the Stanford campus for behavioral testing and brain scanning. The children will receive monetary compensation and pictures of their brains -- great for show and tell.

Persons who are interested in participating in the study can contact Michelle Neely at mnneely@stanford.edu or call 650-862-9127.

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