News

Mountain lion spotted near Redwood City

 

A mountain lion was sighted Wednesday night in an unincorporated area of San Mateo County, according to the Office of Emergency Services.

The wild animal was seen at about 11 p.m. near the 3800 block of Hamilton Way in the Emerald Lake neighborhood. Residents are advised not to approach mountain lions, to avoid hiking or jogging when the cats are most active -- at dawn, dusk and night -- and to keep a close watch on small children.

Mountain lions generally try to avoid confrontation, but residents who encounter the animal should not flee, but rather face the animal, make noise and try to appear larger with arm waving. More information about mountain lions is available at www.keepmewild.org.

— Bay City News Service

Comments

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Posted by Alphonso
a resident of Los Altos Hills
on Jul 15, 2010 at 10:44 am

The keepthemwild site actually says -"Don’t leave small children or pets outside unattended."

This is probably the same lion that was seen a few weeks ago and the area is not on the edge of open space. The lion has established the area as part of its territory. Time to trap it or shoot it.


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Posted by Trap or Shoot
a resident of University South
on Jul 15, 2010 at 12:26 pm


The animals that get too close to the sprawl should be relocated. Shooting everything isn't the answer...


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Posted by Alphonso
a resident of Los Altos Hills
on Jul 15, 2010 at 12:40 pm

Agreed relocation sounds better. However, they say it is hard to relocate mountain lions because they are very territorial - put one in another's territory and they just try to kill each other.


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Posted by A Noun Ea Mus
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 15, 2010 at 2:31 pm

A co-worker was bike riding in Woodside a few weeks ago. On Mountain Home Road he spotted a large mountain lion just sitting alongside a long driveway. He watched it (they watched each other) for about 10 minutes and then the lion got up and walked away. He didn't report it.


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Posted by Anon.
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 15, 2010 at 2:43 pm

This farce of doing nothing, continuing to grow and plow over land in the hills and then pretending we are living with nature is negligent by the police and the authorities.

Do we need to have some kid mauled or killed before we do anything.

Personally I am on the Mountain Lion's side, but I would like to express it by halting development in the hills all over this area. The houses, and particularly the type of houses are just big ugly status symbols of the kind of power that has gotten us into the mother of all messups on all levels.

If the mountain lion is relocated, he will probably end up competing with other mountain lions for not enough resources anyway.

If nothing is done about this then soon we will have 2 and then 4 mountain lions where we have 1 today.

I also wonder how many sightings are not reported?

Why do we just wait for some innocent kid to get attacked before we do something? Kill it, and then maybe put it in the middle of town and drive through people's heads what beautiful creatures we are killing off by selling the land that belong to all of us.


Like this comment
Posted by cary
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Jul 15, 2010 at 2:47 pm

Strap an iPhone 4 to it.


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Posted by A Noun Ea Mus
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 15, 2010 at 5:28 pm

It's not about "whose side you are on". I think it's ridiculous to say that the reason we are seeing more mountain lions in urban to semi-urban/residential areas is because "we are moving into their area" and pushing them out.

The deer and mountain lion populations have both just been increasing. Naturally both will expand until...

I just think we need to re-instill "fear of humans" back into the mountain lions. Slingshots, rocks, a group of people pulling their shirts over their heads and running at them while screaming "I am Cornholio", whatever. Maybe even taking a few out who are too easy going and casual about being seen by humans.

Even if relocation works, a place found without a competing lion and adequate natural food, it would then only be a matter of time before it contributed to another population expansion focci and in need of the same remedy.

These aren't squirrels.


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Posted by Pete Puma
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 15, 2010 at 7:34 pm

We did not have this mountain lion problem when dogs were allowed to roam free. Any mountain lion wandering into the area would soon be chased off by the neighborhood hounds. The same goes for the deer, which is probably what the mountain lions are after. Now that leash laws are more rigorously enforced, Fido is penned up in the back yard or the kennel and the mountain lions and deer have no reason to avoid populated areas.

It is easy for folks in the flatlands to be on the mountain lion's side. That seems to change very quickly on the rare occasions when one shows up in their back yard.

@Anon, most mountain lion sightings are not reported. I have seen them a number of times when driving on Arastradero Road. They are also frequently sighted in Portola Valley, Woodside, Los Altos Hills and the other mountain communities. There are plenty of coyotes and deer, too. All are commonplace, so most residents do not bother to report them.


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Posted by Anon.
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 15, 2010 at 9:04 pm

>> I think it's ridiculous to say that the reason we are seeing more mountain lions in urban to semi-urban/residential areas is because "we are moving into their area" and pushing them out.

To deny it is ridiculous factorial ... it's just funny. Thinking that we can reduce habitat and clear areas up in the hills like has been done in the last 30 years ... and I know because I used to hike and bike up there a lot and the place is totally different now ... and it will not affect wildlife of where they need to forage for food is way past funny and ridiculous.

Suggesting allowing dogs to roam free is really funny. Is there something in the water in Palo Alto?


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Posted by Resident
a resident of Los Altos Hills
on Jul 16, 2010 at 6:58 am

It is estimated there are more than 40 mountain lions in the Santa Cruz mountains. Anywhere a mountain lion is relocated it will be in another mountain lions territory.

Unfortunately, their prey, deer, are decreasing in number as the number of mountain lions increase. Thirty years ago I counted 28 deer in my front yard in Los Alto Hills, now I never see any. Mountain lions have increased in number and deer have decreased.

My son finds dead deer carcasses in his yard in Atascadero and has seen mountain lions resting by a nearby creek. His two year old still plays in the yard!!!


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Posted by A Noun Ea Mus
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 16, 2010 at 4:48 pm

And as the mountain lion population increases.....the deer population tends to decrease or even out (depending on perspective).....the deer and mountain lions lose their fear or humans.....older mountain lions who can no longer hunt natural prey effectively, or young males, or females desperate to feed their young, don't have enough natural prey left.......

Who's for dinner?


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