News

Outgoing director reflects on special education

In a constantly evolving field, today's cases are more 'complex, severe,' Carol Zepecki says

In a town famous for its competitive, nationally ranked high schools, about 10 percent of Palo Alto children navigate kindergarten through 12th grade with learning disabilities.

Some are minor -- a speech impediment addressed by 20 minutes a week of speech therapy. At the other extreme are students with severe emotional handicaps that warrant specialized therapeutic boarding schools.

Carol Zepecki, who retires this month from the Palo Alto school district after decades in special education, has seen them all.

Lately, she says, the "complexity and severity" of need has grown.

While some kids who earlier needed special education can now be accommodated in regular classrooms, today's students with learning disabilities often have symptoms that are more challenging than before, Zepecki said.

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She spoke in a recent interview in her Churchill Avenue office, filled with flowers from colleagues and families grateful for her help over the years.

"The complexity of kids we are seeing certainly has increased."

And nobody knows why, Zepecki said.

"There are researchers much smarter than I who can't figure out the cause of autism, neurologically involved issues, more emotional needs in kids.

"There's a lot of conjecture about environmental factors -- we just don't know," she said.

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But with higher standards for students across the board -- and Zepecki is careful to make clear that she has no beef with high standards -- it becomes harder for many special education students to "align" with them.

"That's why aide support is so important. It helps students with organizational skills, re-practicing concepts, and so forth," Zepecki said.

In a career that began in New Jersey in the 1970s, Zepecki has witnessed every trend.

She worked as the field developed from segregated programs for students with mental retardation and obvious physical disabilities to a far more nuanced set of diagnoses and an emphasis on the goal of "full inclusion" of children with special needs.

Zepecki is well known to most families of Palo Alto's approximately 1,200 students in special education as a key decision-maker in many cases. (Palo Alto falls within the national norm of having about 10 percent of students in special education, she said.)

She confers with parents in search of programs tailored to their child's special needs, and tries to set them up with the right match.

At times, that's expensive.

The district sends about 30 or 40 children each year to what it calls "non-public schools certified by the state" for special education.

Those include the Esther Clark School at the Children's Health Council in Palo Alto; the Pacific Autism Center for Education in Santa Clara; Palo Alto Prep in Palo Alto; Achieve Kids in Palo Alto and Morgan Autism Center in San Jose, Zepecki said.

In a handful of cases -- perhaps four or five a year -- children with emotional disturbances are sent to residential facilities, mostly in California.

"The residential is done through the Department of Mental Health and only for kids with emotional disturbances, but we stay in touch," Zepecki said. In those cases, the district pays only for the school tuition, while the state covers room, board and counseling fees.

Altogether, special education consumes about 15 percent of the district's $154 million operating budget. Of that total, about 40 percent comes from state government, 10 percent from federal government and the balance from local funds.

Decades ago the federal government agreed to fund about 40 percent of the cost of the federal special education law, but that figure has dropped to about 10 percent, she said.

"It's an ongoing effort from states and local districts to try to get the federal government to pay a larger piece," she said.

A reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in the 1990s called for major changes: greater parental involvement in crafting "individualized educational plans" (IEPs) for their child and a stress on educating children in the "least restrictive environment."

"That's a significant change that I've seen over the years, not just in Palo Alto but throughout the nation.

"That's where we got the terminology of mainstreaming and full inclusion -- making sure the student with disabilities is, to the maximum extent possible, interacting with non-disabled peers," Zepecki said.

With the "full inclusion" goal came the hiring of more aides -- sometimes one-on-one -- to help a child learn, with minimal disruption, in a regular classroom.

Eligibility criteria for special education also have changed over the years.

The initial focus of the 1975 federal law was on obvious physical and mental disabilities. Today there are 13 ways to be eligible for special education.

The most significant, Zepecki said, is known as a "specific learning disability" defined as a discrepancy between a child's "projected IQ ability and the child's actual performance in reading, math and writing."

Experts are now moving away from the "discrepancy model" toward a new idea known as "response to intervention," Zepecki said.

Still, "one of the largest populations of students in special education are learning disabled students under the discrepancy model," she said.

Other categories include mental retardation, emotional disturbance, multiple disabilities, hard of hearing, orthopedic impairment, autism, deafness, traumatic brain injury, speech and language impairment, "other health impaired," visual impairment and blindness.

A diagnosis of attention deficit disorder does not qualify a child for special education, although parents lobbied to include that category when the federal law was last reauthorized, Zepecki said.

"A student with attention issues sometimes is identified as learning disabled, and sometimes it's significant enough, medically related, that they might be identified as 'other health impaired,'" she said.

As to whether Palo Alto has a disproportionate number of minority children in special education, the answer is mixed, Zepecki said.

Looking at children in resource programs (those who spend less than 50 percent of their time in special education, but excluding those in "special classes"), Palo Alto "has been found by state formula to have a disproportionate number of African-American and Latino students" in special education, Zepecki said.

"But if you look broadly across the program, we're not disproportionate," she said.

"Five years ago we had a study from the Office of Civil Rights. They looked at our disproportionality and found that if we didn't support some of the students we would be discriminatory in the other direction.

"We were following all the rules and we need to support the kids. It's a very difficult balance. We're aware of it, and keep working on it."

Though the primary focus of her 12 years in Palo Alto has been special education, Zepecki has added other roles as well -- most recently, as the district's point person following a series of student suicides from May to October 2009.

It fell to her to compile research on so-called "suicide clusters," confer with national experts, handle a flood of calls and advice that came to the school district and work with local medical institutions and community agencies to form a response.

One result is Project Safety Net, a multi-agency collaboration to create a healthier environment for Palo Alto teens.

Zepecki also has worked to craft the district's internal response to the suicides, including suicide-prevention training for faculty and staff and a recommendation to adopt the developmental assets model of the non-profit Project Cornerstone as a way to support teens.

Besides upcoming trips to India and South America and spending more time with family -- including five grandchildren who live locally -- Zepecki plans to stay professionally active in retirement.

She is interested in teacher training, and has been invited to join several boards of nonprofits that support students with disabilities.

For families entering the daunting world of special education for the first time, she offers this advice:

"Keep the lines of communication open with the teacher or therapist who is assessing or managing the IEP.

"If something does not work, contact them and try to figure it out together. The parents can discuss their ideas and views and the district staff can then discuss their ideas.

"Together, they can hopefully put together the best program for their child. At times they may not agree, and then there is a process for resolving those concerns."

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Outgoing director reflects on special education

In a constantly evolving field, today's cases are more 'complex, severe,' Carol Zepecki says

by / Palo Alto Online

Uploaded: Tue, Jun 8, 2010, 8:51 am

In a town famous for its competitive, nationally ranked high schools, about 10 percent of Palo Alto children navigate kindergarten through 12th grade with learning disabilities.

Some are minor -- a speech impediment addressed by 20 minutes a week of speech therapy. At the other extreme are students with severe emotional handicaps that warrant specialized therapeutic boarding schools.

Carol Zepecki, who retires this month from the Palo Alto school district after decades in special education, has seen them all.

Lately, she says, the "complexity and severity" of need has grown.

While some kids who earlier needed special education can now be accommodated in regular classrooms, today's students with learning disabilities often have symptoms that are more challenging than before, Zepecki said.

She spoke in a recent interview in her Churchill Avenue office, filled with flowers from colleagues and families grateful for her help over the years.

"The complexity of kids we are seeing certainly has increased."

And nobody knows why, Zepecki said.

"There are researchers much smarter than I who can't figure out the cause of autism, neurologically involved issues, more emotional needs in kids.

"There's a lot of conjecture about environmental factors -- we just don't know," she said.

But with higher standards for students across the board -- and Zepecki is careful to make clear that she has no beef with high standards -- it becomes harder for many special education students to "align" with them.

"That's why aide support is so important. It helps students with organizational skills, re-practicing concepts, and so forth," Zepecki said.

In a career that began in New Jersey in the 1970s, Zepecki has witnessed every trend.

She worked as the field developed from segregated programs for students with mental retardation and obvious physical disabilities to a far more nuanced set of diagnoses and an emphasis on the goal of "full inclusion" of children with special needs.

Zepecki is well known to most families of Palo Alto's approximately 1,200 students in special education as a key decision-maker in many cases. (Palo Alto falls within the national norm of having about 10 percent of students in special education, she said.)

She confers with parents in search of programs tailored to their child's special needs, and tries to set them up with the right match.

At times, that's expensive.

The district sends about 30 or 40 children each year to what it calls "non-public schools certified by the state" for special education.

Those include the Esther Clark School at the Children's Health Council in Palo Alto; the Pacific Autism Center for Education in Santa Clara; Palo Alto Prep in Palo Alto; Achieve Kids in Palo Alto and Morgan Autism Center in San Jose, Zepecki said.

In a handful of cases -- perhaps four or five a year -- children with emotional disturbances are sent to residential facilities, mostly in California.

"The residential is done through the Department of Mental Health and only for kids with emotional disturbances, but we stay in touch," Zepecki said. In those cases, the district pays only for the school tuition, while the state covers room, board and counseling fees.

Altogether, special education consumes about 15 percent of the district's $154 million operating budget. Of that total, about 40 percent comes from state government, 10 percent from federal government and the balance from local funds.

Decades ago the federal government agreed to fund about 40 percent of the cost of the federal special education law, but that figure has dropped to about 10 percent, she said.

"It's an ongoing effort from states and local districts to try to get the federal government to pay a larger piece," she said.

A reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act in the 1990s called for major changes: greater parental involvement in crafting "individualized educational plans" (IEPs) for their child and a stress on educating children in the "least restrictive environment."

"That's a significant change that I've seen over the years, not just in Palo Alto but throughout the nation.

"That's where we got the terminology of mainstreaming and full inclusion -- making sure the student with disabilities is, to the maximum extent possible, interacting with non-disabled peers," Zepecki said.

With the "full inclusion" goal came the hiring of more aides -- sometimes one-on-one -- to help a child learn, with minimal disruption, in a regular classroom.

Eligibility criteria for special education also have changed over the years.

The initial focus of the 1975 federal law was on obvious physical and mental disabilities. Today there are 13 ways to be eligible for special education.

The most significant, Zepecki said, is known as a "specific learning disability" defined as a discrepancy between a child's "projected IQ ability and the child's actual performance in reading, math and writing."

Experts are now moving away from the "discrepancy model" toward a new idea known as "response to intervention," Zepecki said.

Still, "one of the largest populations of students in special education are learning disabled students under the discrepancy model," she said.

Other categories include mental retardation, emotional disturbance, multiple disabilities, hard of hearing, orthopedic impairment, autism, deafness, traumatic brain injury, speech and language impairment, "other health impaired," visual impairment and blindness.

A diagnosis of attention deficit disorder does not qualify a child for special education, although parents lobbied to include that category when the federal law was last reauthorized, Zepecki said.

"A student with attention issues sometimes is identified as learning disabled, and sometimes it's significant enough, medically related, that they might be identified as 'other health impaired,'" she said.

As to whether Palo Alto has a disproportionate number of minority children in special education, the answer is mixed, Zepecki said.

Looking at children in resource programs (those who spend less than 50 percent of their time in special education, but excluding those in "special classes"), Palo Alto "has been found by state formula to have a disproportionate number of African-American and Latino students" in special education, Zepecki said.

"But if you look broadly across the program, we're not disproportionate," she said.

"Five years ago we had a study from the Office of Civil Rights. They looked at our disproportionality and found that if we didn't support some of the students we would be discriminatory in the other direction.

"We were following all the rules and we need to support the kids. It's a very difficult balance. We're aware of it, and keep working on it."

Though the primary focus of her 12 years in Palo Alto has been special education, Zepecki has added other roles as well -- most recently, as the district's point person following a series of student suicides from May to October 2009.

It fell to her to compile research on so-called "suicide clusters," confer with national experts, handle a flood of calls and advice that came to the school district and work with local medical institutions and community agencies to form a response.

One result is Project Safety Net, a multi-agency collaboration to create a healthier environment for Palo Alto teens.

Zepecki also has worked to craft the district's internal response to the suicides, including suicide-prevention training for faculty and staff and a recommendation to adopt the developmental assets model of the non-profit Project Cornerstone as a way to support teens.

Besides upcoming trips to India and South America and spending more time with family -- including five grandchildren who live locally -- Zepecki plans to stay professionally active in retirement.

She is interested in teacher training, and has been invited to join several boards of nonprofits that support students with disabilities.

For families entering the daunting world of special education for the first time, she offers this advice:

"Keep the lines of communication open with the teacher or therapist who is assessing or managing the IEP.

"If something does not work, contact them and try to figure it out together. The parents can discuss their ideas and views and the district staff can then discuss their ideas.

"Together, they can hopefully put together the best program for their child. At times they may not agree, and then there is a process for resolving those concerns."

Comments

Barron Park Parent
Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:19 am
Barron Park Parent, Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:19 am

[Post removed by Palo Alto Online staff.]


Me Too
Midtown
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:29 am
Me Too, Midtown
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:29 am

Our experience with Carol was positive. She was knowledgeable, energetic, and ultimately practical about addressing the needs of the student.


palo alto mom
Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:31 am
palo alto mom, Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:31 am

I have found Ms. Zepecki to be a great advocate for the children of PAUSD, she will be missed. I am curious about whether PAUSD has the same percentage of special ed kids as other districts. I know of several families who moved here specifically for the special needs kids.


Around the Block
Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:52 am
Around the Block, Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:52 am

"I am curious about whether PAUSD has the same percentage of special ed kids as other districts."

Richer districts tend to cater more to special ed kids because the parents are richer and better educated, so they are more likely to threaten legal action to get what they want.

Poor families don't have the resources or knowledge to go to court.


barb
another community
on Jun 8, 2010 at 10:51 am
barb, another community
on Jun 8, 2010 at 10:51 am

I have a doctorate in psychology, have been a college dean and teacher, and have worked with and on behalf of a number of kids with learning disabilities through their PA educational careers including my own kids. Carol Zepecki is simply the best I have ever worked with. She is that rare brilliant mind that can be totally in the now, doing a gentle and unintrusive triage as a family struggles with all the issues our kids face. Over the years the budgets kept getting smaller, but somehow, Carol managed to find resources for so many of our kids. It's been several years since our youngest graduated high school and I'm still learning from her work with us as I come to understand all the issues she was addressing at one time. Her departure represents a huge loss to the district.


parent
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:24 am
parent, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:24 am

Read between the lines on the RTI vs. discrepancy model. RTI saves money by leaving LD kids with math and writing problems undiagnosed until it is too late to catch up given out high standards. When Carol says, "the experts", does she mean that the IDEA specifies which model to use or that she has guided PAUSD towards the money-saving model to the detriment of a category of learners. Having undiagnosed learning disabilities can lead to depression and anxiety and we have seen the result of those problems over the last year.


PA mom
Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:36 am
PA mom, Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:36 am

While I'm sure Ms. Zepecki has done a lot of good, I found her quite unsympathetic when I brought the unprofessional behavior of a staff, a staff who received numerous complaints from other parents, to her attention. She seemed to think that staff could do no wrong, that the staff is always right and the parent is always wrong. She said she wanted to protect that staff from consequences for his/her actions. It seemed to be a school culture where the staff protect their own no matter how they behave. While I'm all for the school's having a supportive work environment, I think that needs to be balanced with an environment that supports the parents as well.


Mom of Paly Junior
Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:55 am
Mom of Paly Junior, Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:55 am

Carol is the best! She turned my son's education around 180 degrees. Without her help, my son would have either flunked out of school freshman year or ended up at Alta Vista and most likely would have dropped out. I'm so grateful for all she has done for my son and my family. My son certainly wouldn't be headed for Paly gradutation next year without her expertise. She is amazing, period.
She will be missed!! Wishing you a very HAPPY RETIREMENT, Carol!
Thanks for all you have done for so many.


Midtown Parent
Palo Verde
on Jun 8, 2010 at 12:20 pm
Midtown Parent, Palo Verde
on Jun 8, 2010 at 12:20 pm

Probably the ones who got good services from her were rich and educated. I know many families who are not rich, white nor highly educated, those got only the learning disable or handicapped label from Carol to their children. Sadly but true! The ones who did not notice the bad service their kids were getting is because they ignore how much other students got. Sometimes is better to be ignorant because it feels ugly to know it and not bee able to do anything about it. Lawyers are expensive, and yes there are some legal aids who might help but they are backed up.


Cathy
Downtown North
on Jun 8, 2010 at 1:19 pm
Cathy, Downtown North
on Jun 8, 2010 at 1:19 pm

Carol was a completely dedicated, warm, intelligent multi-tasker who really tried to help everyone. If you reached out to her, she reached back. Her heart was truly in it for the kids. She had limitations to work around, namely budget, laws, even politics (special ed gets too much money--we should spend more on our AP students!). She was well versed in all of it and knew better than anyone how to work around everything and still get it done for the kids. That is her legacy: deeply caring about and helping the kids.

She leaves big shoes to fill.


Maurine Meleck
another community
on Jun 8, 2010 at 4:34 pm
Maurine Meleck, another community
on Jun 8, 2010 at 4:34 pm

well, that's nice that she was a good teacher and all, but that's not really the point of this article. The point is the number of children here and all over the country with special needs and learning disabilities. School funds are already pushed to the limits and 1 in 5 children with a learning disability isn't oing to help. 1 in every 58 boys with autism now isn't going to help the situation either. When is our government, health professionals, pediatyricians going to say, "Let's stop this epidemic now. Let's find out what's behind all these children being sick, having learning disabilities etc." It's a crisis now-it was a crisis yesterday. Or are they going to con tinue their mantra, "We don't know what the answer is, but we know it's not vaccines." "Environmental causes, they say, "No, it must be genetic. We need to find the genes." A total waste of time and money.


Midtown Parent
Midtown
on Jun 8, 2010 at 6:05 pm
Midtown Parent, Midtown
on Jun 8, 2010 at 6:05 pm

[Post removed by Palo Alto Online staff.]


namewithheld
Old Palo Alto
on Jun 8, 2010 at 6:35 pm
namewithheld, Old Palo Alto
on Jun 8, 2010 at 6:35 pm

My son needed help all through school. I will tell you this. They will always try their best. To give you the least amount of help your child needs.
You HAVE TO fight them every step of the way. I also know from my experience and from others, that have shared mine. You wont get what you need. Unless you hire a attorney, or at least a good advocate. You will also find your self spending thousands of dollars to to get testing done to prove your case.

Zepecki is not as bad as they come I have heard of much worse.
You have to remember her first priority will always be the district and not your child's best interest.

Lets hope the new seat holder. Will be more willing to our sons and daughters first. Not the districts financial short comings.


palo alto mom
Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 8:15 pm
palo alto mom, Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 8:15 pm

To namewitheld -

My experience at Addison was that they tried to give the most they could to help a child, not the least. There was no fighting the system at all. Since a large number of the students helped by the resource teachers were VTP students, I don't think anyone needed to be rich. Or even have a parent advocate. The teachers were very aware of student's needs and most went WAY beyond what would be expected of them.

Perhaps it was the school leadership or the teachers themselves, but for the most part, I felt like the students came first.


James Witt
Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:42 pm
James Witt, Barron Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 9:42 pm

carol
thank you! we are so blessed to have dedicated people like you
well no one is exactly like you, you are great we will miss you
enjoy your next chapter knowing you helped many many families
thanks again


Olenka
Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:37 pm
Olenka, Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:37 pm

What a fitting tribute to a community leader who has done so much for Palo Alto's "special" kids.

Advocating a legal and combative approach to securing services under Carol's watch was rarely (never?) needed. I encourage parents looking for support to tap into the many groups who try to be helpful navigating IEPs and the system. Carol effectively managed a team who were often stretched to their case limits but still served us exceptionally well.

One organization that helps in Palo Alto is the CAC, a volunteer run group which bridges relations between parents of special needs kids and the School District. There are members who focus specifically on the Latino community, who often feel disconnected with the process. www.cac.org.

Carol set the gold standard on how to meet budget objectives, but never at the expense of the many kids she served. She will be missed dearly, and I wish her well.


Olenka
Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:44 pm
Olenka, Crescent Park
on Jun 8, 2010 at 11:44 pm

I wrote the wrong website for the CAC in my previous post. It is: www.cac-paloalto.org.


gladshesgone
Barron Park
on Jun 9, 2010 at 7:21 am
gladshesgone, Barron Park
on Jun 9, 2010 at 7:21 am

[Post removed by Palo Alto Online staff.]


Pauline Navarro
Fletcher Middle School
on Jun 9, 2010 at 8:54 am
Pauline Navarro, Fletcher Middle School
on Jun 9, 2010 at 8:54 am

My work with Carol concerning all types of special needs kids over the last 12 years has proven to me repeatedly that Carol is a kind, compassionate, knowledgeable leader who "gets it".

She managed to walk around and through treacherous patches in different budgetary and political climates, balance between diametrically opposed opinions all around her, and make hard but necessary choices, always with a compassionate mind toward what is the best placement, within our human/resources limits, of a child to help that child grow.

And yet, not once, in all my years of working with her, did I see a closed or arrogant mind, only a humble spirit open to listening, learning and growing.

In fact, she is going to be quite embarrassed by this, but she richly deserves all praise and admiration I can heap on her.

In contrast, she would be the first to say that there were paths we took that, once taken, did not work out as we had hoped...but one of the best qualities of Carol's leadership was her willingness to re-evaluate choices and change course as needed. She understood that we all make the best choices we can with whatever information and resources we have available at that moment,then hopefully learn from them...and she was always open to learning.

So, I thank you for your years of far above the call of duty service, Carol, and wish you a great next chapter in your life!!




momof2boys
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jun 9, 2010 at 9:36 am
momof2boys, Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jun 9, 2010 at 9:36 am

Thank you Carol for all you had given to our family in the past 9 years. You were there to help us when my son needed the most. You knew the situation and tried to help in every possible way, in a very timely manner. Thank you so much for your dedication, understanding, patience, and hard work.

You will be missed, Carol.


Brown
El Carmelo School
on Jun 9, 2010 at 10:04 am
Brown, El Carmelo School
on Jun 9, 2010 at 10:04 am

Congrats, Dr. Zepecki. Wish you the best in the future, either it be spending time with yout grandchildren or traveling the world. Your replacement has many challenges ahead with budget issues, etc. Our goal is that she focus on the following:

* Minorities are not getting the support needed for autism. Correctly indicate the child's diagnoses so that appropriate treatment is provided and that teachers can be more sensitive. It starts at the top!

* Train teachers and principals to be more understanding of families with children with disabilities. We've literally had teachers imply that we were the problem vs. his autism. Train teachers to adhere to confidentiality rules. We've had a teacher diagnose our son ADHD vs Autism among her friends at a party. This was truly a blow to our family.

* Anxiety leads to depression. Depression has led many young people to the train tracks, here in Palo Alto. What's the plan to help children before they get to the train tracks? Please demonstrate a collaborate partnership keeping the end result on helping the child. Our principal doesn't have that at heart for our little guy. I can share many examples, and I will, when appropriate.


Midtown Parent
Palo Verde
on Jun 10, 2010 at 1:58 pm
Midtown Parent, Palo Verde
on Jun 10, 2010 at 1:58 pm

To Brown,
Anxiety leads to depression. Depression has led many young people to the train tracks, here in Palo Alto. What's the plan to help children before they get to the train tracks? Please demonstrate a collaborate partnership keeping the end result on helping the child. Our principal doesn't have that at heart for our little guy. I can share many examples, and I will, when appropriate.
I could not agree with you more. I know for sure that one of the students who die, was an especial ed kid who was not accepted because of this disability as his mother said it in the letter to the district. We need to improve this, we can't keep stressing out our kids till we sent them to the tracks. We need to accept them and provide the necessary support to all special ed students, nut just the students who are children of rich and professional people.
Our special Ed. team does not have the heart for our children either, they plan to take the services we hardly fight for them to get them when they were classified, instead of giving them more. I am glad the year is over and we are going to have new people, hopefully they will be better.


Parent of an underserve child
JLS Middle School
on Jun 11, 2010 at 9:57 am
Parent of an underserve child, JLS Middle School
on Jun 11, 2010 at 9:57 am

Yeah! she is gone. The nightmare is over. She made me cry and be awake when my child needed an evaluation so much and all she would say is "it is a lot of money" it took two long years to finally get it done and a attorney.


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