News

Three Tesla employees die in plane crash

'This is a tragic day for us,' Tesla CEO Elon Musk says

Tesla Motors of Palo Alto confirmed today that three of its employees were killed in a small-plane crash in East Palo Alto.

"Tesla is a small, tightly knit company, and this is a tragic day for us," said Elon Musk, CEO of the electric-vehicle manufacturer.

He declined to name the employees early this afternoon, saying that the company was working with authorities to notify the families.

"Our thoughts and prayers are with them," Musk said.

Sources close to the company identified the three men as Doug Bourn, a senior electrical engineer; Andrew Ingram, an engineer; and Brian Finn, a senior manager.

Bourn, 56, the pilot and owner of the plane, had filed a flight plan indicating the trio was headed for Hawthorne Municipal Airport in Los Angeles County, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Fog limited visibility to only one-eighth of a mile, but the flight plan indicated the plane would be on instrument takeoff, and records indicate the instruments were in use, investigators said.

Bourn graduated from Stanford University with a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering. He worked for IDEO of Palo Alto as a senior engineer from 1995 to 2005, his former employer confirmed.

"We are all deeply saddened, but we can't comment beyond that," an IDEO official said this morning.

Finn had worked for Tesla for a year and 8 months, according to his profile on LinkedIn.com. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Northern Illinois University in 1990 and 1992, respectively. He previously worked for Volkswagen Electronics and Volkswagen of America.

He enjoyed gardening, cycling, skiing and playing the guitar, his profile stated.

Ingram, a 2001 Harvey Mudd College graduate, previously worked for Dolby Laboratories and Christie, Parker and Hale.

The Cessna 310R crashed shortly before 8 a.m. Wednesday in East Palo Alto. It took off from the Palo Alto Airport but took a sudden left turn on ascent.

Its wing clipped a power line, hit a PG&E tower and fell into a home, setting the house on fire, according to officials. Its engine and landing gear crashed into an adjacent home, and its fuselage came to rest on a sidewalk after hitting a retaining wall and plowing into two cars, which caught on fire.

No one on the ground was killed, but the owner of the preschool that the wing had hit was taken to the hospital on account of the stress, witnesses said.

Related stories:

'There was fire everywhere,' crash witness reports

Fire chief: 'It was a miracle' no residents died

-- Palo Alto Weekly staff

We can't do it without you.
Support local journalism.

Comments

4 people like this
Posted by moreball
a resident of Community Center
on Feb 18, 2010 at 10:09 am

Homes, power lines, bird sanctuary....
Close the airport. This should be a no-brainer.


1 person likes this
Posted by JCaldwell
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 18, 2010 at 12:03 pm

and San Carlos too? Am pretty sure the flight path was not where this plane ended up. A tragic crash but I see no reason to close the airport.


1 person likes this
Posted by BreinTrans LLC
a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 1, 2016 at 9:13 am

Electronics “Tesla S” will not guarantee the safety of human inadequacy. The"Exhale"breintrans.eu - solution to the problem. “Tesla” replied 07/05, "Exhalation" to control the physical and mental adequacy breintrans.eu project it is "very interesting!"


Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.

Don't be the last to know

Get the latest headlines sent straight to your inbox every day.

Simply Sandwiches shutters in Palo Alto
By Elena Kadvany | 10 comments | 3,124 views

More Stupid Plastic Food Things
By Laura Stec | 9 comments | 1,485 views

Operation Varsity Blues
By John Raftrey and Lori McCormick | 4 comments | 1,316 views

Couples: Write a Personal Ad . . . to Your Partner . . .
By Chandrama Anderson | 1 comment | 1,193 views

State Legislature on Housing: Getting the Demos out of Democracy & with it, Accountability
By Douglas Moran | 5 comments | 1,108 views

 

Short story writers wanted!

The 33rd Annual Palo Alto Weekly Short Story Contest is now accepting entries for Adult, Young Adult (15-17) and Teen (12-14) categories. Send us your short story (2,500 words or less) and entry form by March 29. First, Second and Third Place prizes awarded in each category.

Contest Details