Real Estate

Loyola Corners

Former train stop retains rural character

When Michel Szarindar and his family moved from London to Los Altos' Loyola Corners three years ago, they were excited about the tree-lined, open streets that gave the neighborhood a village feel. They did not, however, expect to be surrounded by other Europeans.

After moving into their home on Richardson Avenue, they quickly discovered that they were part of an eclectic mix of neighbors with families from around the world, including France, Spain and Belgium.

Szarindar, who is originally from France, said he thinks the neighborhood's large lots and abundance of greenery make the neighborhood particularly attractive for those looking to move into the area. There's much less concrete in Loyola Corners than other neighboring communities, he said.

"It was really a nice coincidence to have three French people on the road," he said. "Everybody's really interested to know us as well, which is good."

Located in south Los Altos, Loyola Corners is located about 10 minutes from the new Apple Campus and 15 minutes from the Googleplex in Mountain View. Loyola Corners started out as a train stop for the Southern Pacific Railway, but when the city incorporated in 1952, attention shifted north to building up the city's downtown business district. Once out of the spotlight, Loyola Corners remained relatively unchanged in the following decades, and the residential neighborhood that grew around the former station retained that rural feel from the city's earlier era.

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Roughly bounded by Clinton Road and Fremont and Miramonte avenues, the triangular-shaped neighborhood is like a compact town with its own shopping district, a post office, three parks and a cluster of medical offices. The residential streets that wind through the neighborhood resemble wide country roads with no sidewalks and lots of low-hanging trees.

Mary Anne and Jeff Dazel moved to Richardson Avenue in 1978 when Mary Anne was pregnant with their daughter. Although nearly 40 years that have passed since then, Mary Anne thinks that newer residents come to Loyola Corners for the exact same reason she did: to let their kids grow up in a safe and comfortable community where they can express themselves.

The longtime resident said she is worried that with new construction and planned upgrades to the commercial district, the neighborhood may lose its rural charm. She praised the 2016 renovation of the Loyola Bridge that connects the neighborhood to the country club across Foothill Expressway, but is leery about a mixed-use project near the commercial center that the city is reviewing.

"I can see fixing things up," she said. "There are some two-stories that are well constructed and keep with the flavor of everything...There are some two-stories that are horrible. So that's what kind of scares (me)."

In the past, residents have clashed with the city council and developers over plans to revitalize the area's commercial businesses and provide more affordable housing. (Los Altos' median home price is $2.8 million). Last April, the council scrapped a potential plan to build more housing units after residents voiced concerns over the size and scope of the dwellings. In October, the council ultimately approved the addition of 20 housing units that were smaller in height and scope. The location of the new buildings has yet to be determined.

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For Szarindar, whose family spends many happy hours outdoors, the barring of three-story buildings is important to preserve the history and idyllic beauty of the neighborhood. His two boys often "bike-pool" to school with other kids on the block, and his wife sometimes runs the eight miles to work. He also would like to see the neighborhood's above-head power lines put underground.

"Progress can be a good thing, but take a breath," Dazel said. "Take a deep breath, and take it slow -- everybody wants the same thing."

FACTS

FIRE STATION: No. 16, 765 Fremont Ave.

LIBRARY: Los Altos, 13 S. San Antonio Road; Woodland, 1975 Grant Road

LOCATION: a triangle roughly bounded by Fremont Avenue, Miramonte Avenue and Clinton Road

PARKS: McKenzie Park, 707 Fremont Ave.; Heritage Oaks Park, Portland and Miramonte avenues

POST OFFICE: Loyola Corners, 1525 Miramonte Ave.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS (nearby): Canterbury Christian School, 101 N. El Monte Ave.; Los Altos Christian School, 625 Magdalena Ave.; Pinewood School, 327 & 477 Fremont Ave.; Saint Francis High School, 1885 Miramonte Ave., Mtn. View

PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Los Altos School District -- Loyola Elementary School, Blach Intermediate School; Mtn. View-Los Altos Union High School District -- Mountain View High School

SHOPPING: Loyola Corners, Rancho Shopping Center

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Loyola Corners

Former train stop retains rural character

Uploaded: Thu, Jan 14, 2010, 11:13 am
Updated: Mon, Jan 23, 2017, 11:36 am

When Michel Szarindar and his family moved from London to Los Altos' Loyola Corners three years ago, they were excited about the tree-lined, open streets that gave the neighborhood a village feel. They did not, however, expect to be surrounded by other Europeans.

After moving into their home on Richardson Avenue, they quickly discovered that they were part of an eclectic mix of neighbors with families from around the world, including France, Spain and Belgium.

Szarindar, who is originally from France, said he thinks the neighborhood's large lots and abundance of greenery make the neighborhood particularly attractive for those looking to move into the area. There's much less concrete in Loyola Corners than other neighboring communities, he said.

"It was really a nice coincidence to have three French people on the road," he said. "Everybody's really interested to know us as well, which is good."

Located in south Los Altos, Loyola Corners is located about 10 minutes from the new Apple Campus and 15 minutes from the Googleplex in Mountain View. Loyola Corners started out as a train stop for the Southern Pacific Railway, but when the city incorporated in 1952, attention shifted north to building up the city's downtown business district. Once out of the spotlight, Loyola Corners remained relatively unchanged in the following decades, and the residential neighborhood that grew around the former station retained that rural feel from the city's earlier era.

Roughly bounded by Clinton Road and Fremont and Miramonte avenues, the triangular-shaped neighborhood is like a compact town with its own shopping district, a post office, three parks and a cluster of medical offices. The residential streets that wind through the neighborhood resemble wide country roads with no sidewalks and lots of low-hanging trees.

Mary Anne and Jeff Dazel moved to Richardson Avenue in 1978 when Mary Anne was pregnant with their daughter. Although nearly 40 years that have passed since then, Mary Anne thinks that newer residents come to Loyola Corners for the exact same reason she did: to let their kids grow up in a safe and comfortable community where they can express themselves.

The longtime resident said she is worried that with new construction and planned upgrades to the commercial district, the neighborhood may lose its rural charm. She praised the 2016 renovation of the Loyola Bridge that connects the neighborhood to the country club across Foothill Expressway, but is leery about a mixed-use project near the commercial center that the city is reviewing.

"I can see fixing things up," she said. "There are some two-stories that are well constructed and keep with the flavor of everything...There are some two-stories that are horrible. So that's what kind of scares (me)."

In the past, residents have clashed with the city council and developers over plans to revitalize the area's commercial businesses and provide more affordable housing. (Los Altos' median home price is $2.8 million). Last April, the council scrapped a potential plan to build more housing units after residents voiced concerns over the size and scope of the dwellings. In October, the council ultimately approved the addition of 20 housing units that were smaller in height and scope. The location of the new buildings has yet to be determined.

For Szarindar, whose family spends many happy hours outdoors, the barring of three-story buildings is important to preserve the history and idyllic beauty of the neighborhood. His two boys often "bike-pool" to school with other kids on the block, and his wife sometimes runs the eight miles to work. He also would like to see the neighborhood's above-head power lines put underground.

"Progress can be a good thing, but take a breath," Dazel said. "Take a deep breath, and take it slow -- everybody wants the same thing."

FACTS

FIRE STATION: No. 16, 765 Fremont Ave.

LIBRARY: Los Altos, 13 S. San Antonio Road; Woodland, 1975 Grant Road

LOCATION: a triangle roughly bounded by Fremont Avenue, Miramonte Avenue and Clinton Road

PARKS: McKenzie Park, 707 Fremont Ave.; Heritage Oaks Park, Portland and Miramonte avenues

POST OFFICE: Loyola Corners, 1525 Miramonte Ave.

PRIVATE SCHOOLS (nearby): Canterbury Christian School, 101 N. El Monte Ave.; Los Altos Christian School, 625 Magdalena Ave.; Pinewood School, 327 & 477 Fremont Ave.; Saint Francis High School, 1885 Miramonte Ave., Mtn. View

PUBLIC SCHOOLS: Los Altos School District -- Loyola Elementary School, Blach Intermediate School; Mtn. View-Los Altos Union High School District -- Mountain View High School

SHOPPING: Loyola Corners, Rancho Shopping Center

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