Sports

Top safety commits to Stanford football

Reynolds cites Harbaugh's three-year contract extension as clincher

Woodberry Forest School (Virginia) senior safety Ed Reynolds officially committed to Stanford and the football program on Tuesday after weighing offers from North Carolina, North Carolina State, Duke and Virginia.

"All I need to do now is finish off the application part," Reynolds told the Bootleg. I spoke to coach (Jim) Harbaugh's father, who is their honorary running backs coach for the week, so it was great."

Reynolds said the clinching factor was Harbaugh signing his three-year contract extension.

"I was really in awe of Stanford when I went there, and on my return trip I got to see them play Notre Dame and it showed me they were really on the rise," Reynolds said. "Then coach Harbaugh signed a three-year contract, so that sealed the deal for me."

Cornerback Louis Young, from Olney, Maryland, also reconfirmed his commitment to Stanford on Monday. He originally gave the school a soft verbal because of a desire to play in the ACC.

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In addition, Stanford also received a commitment from Mitchell County High School (Camilla, Ga.) junior wide receiver Justin Scott on Monday for the 2011 class.

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— Palo Alto Online Sports

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Top safety commits to Stanford football

Reynolds cites Harbaugh's three-year contract extension as clincher

Uploaded: Tue, Dec 22, 2009, 11:07 pm

Woodberry Forest School (Virginia) senior safety Ed Reynolds officially committed to Stanford and the football program on Tuesday after weighing offers from North Carolina, North Carolina State, Duke and Virginia.

"All I need to do now is finish off the application part," Reynolds told the Bootleg. I spoke to coach (Jim) Harbaugh's father, who is their honorary running backs coach for the week, so it was great."

Reynolds said the clinching factor was Harbaugh signing his three-year contract extension.

"I was really in awe of Stanford when I went there, and on my return trip I got to see them play Notre Dame and it showed me they were really on the rise," Reynolds said. "Then coach Harbaugh signed a three-year contract, so that sealed the deal for me."

Cornerback Louis Young, from Olney, Maryland, also reconfirmed his commitment to Stanford on Monday. He originally gave the school a soft verbal because of a desire to play in the ACC.

In addition, Stanford also received a commitment from Mitchell County High School (Camilla, Ga.) junior wide receiver Justin Scott on Monday for the 2011 class.

— Palo Alto Online Sports

Comments

Nate
Old Palo Alto
on Dec 23, 2009 at 12:29 am
Nate, Old Palo Alto
on Dec 23, 2009 at 12:29 am
Like this comment

What does he meant when he says that he "just needs to finish off the" application part"? It sounds as if he can turn in any compilation of numbers, essays, and recs that mildly resemble an "application part" and he is a surefire to get in to Stanford.

This is why it bothers me when people cite "tough" admission standards for athletic programs at "top" schools. If you are a decent student and a recruited athlete, you will gain acceptance into any school you want, apparently even before taking a look at the "application part."


Woodberry Forest Alum
another community
on Dec 23, 2009 at 7:56 am
Woodberry Forest Alum, another community
on Dec 23, 2009 at 7:56 am
Like this comment

Ed Reynolds is a gifted student in the 3.9/4.0 range at a highly selective boarding school, Woodberry Forest, in Virginia. Woodberry matriculates 100% of its students to college and its students hail from over 30 states and 10 foreign countries. Students go to Woodberry for its academic rigor, excellent faculty, honor system, and its outstanding athletics and arts offerings. You have just landed a "face of the program" student athlete at Stanford. He is a first class young man on a number of levels and would be admittable to Stanford without football.
How recruiting and admissions work at Stanford us unknown to me, I just want you to know what type of academic background and training Ed has achieved in his four years at Woodberry Forest. In addition to being a fine young man and excellent student, he is a big time football player.


Palo Altan
Crescent Park
on Dec 23, 2009 at 8:12 am
Palo Altan, Crescent Park
on Dec 23, 2009 at 8:12 am
Like this comment

good one, Nate.


Football Parent
Stanford
on Dec 23, 2009 at 9:10 am
Football Parent, Stanford
on Dec 23, 2009 at 9:10 am
Like this comment

As a parent of a Stanford football player, I can assure you that "finishing the application part" is critical. The athlete has to get into Stanford just like any other student. That is why when you see early commits to Stanford that end up at Cal or UCLA it is usually because when the "application part" is finished, they didn't get in. That is why it is so amazing that Stanford competes in the PAC 10 at all.


Stanford Prof
Old Palo Alto
on Dec 23, 2009 at 9:26 am
Stanford Prof, Old Palo Alto
on Dec 23, 2009 at 9:26 am
Like this comment

The University claims that all students applying to Stanford, whether athletes or not, must complete the application process in order to be considered. Such statements have been made publicly and privately by Stanford admissions officials and others. But now we have public evidence--the reported statement by a football safety from Virginia--that this is not true in his case.

Maybe the University President, and the Faculty Senate, should separately look into this? Is the football safety incorrect? Or...? Maybe Stanford is less than candid.


Jon
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Dec 23, 2009 at 11:07 am
Jon, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Dec 23, 2009 at 11:07 am
Like this comment

I think people are missing the point. Athletes officially commit all the time to Stanford before the application process is started. They then have to get through Admissions which is easier said than done.


Stanford Prof
Old Palo Alto
on Dec 23, 2009 at 11:52 am
Stanford Prof, Old Palo Alto
on Dec 23, 2009 at 11:52 am
Like this comment

You've misunderstood, and are missing "the point:" The football safety stated. in the words of the issued report, that he had "officially committed" after weighing competing offers from various schools. That sounds, in law, like a contract--and not something contingent.

Reading careful is useful. Let's wait for Stanford's reply.


Clearinghouse
Barron Park
on Dec 23, 2009 at 2:48 pm
Clearinghouse, Barron Park
on Dec 23, 2009 at 2:48 pm
Like this comment

"You've misunderstood, and are missing "the point:" The football safety stated. in the words of the issued report, that he had "officially committed" after weighing competing offers from various schools. That sounds, in law, like a contract--and not something contingent."

Not true. Directly from the NLI website:

"Pursuant to the terms of the National Letter of Intent program, participating institutions agree to provide athletics financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete, provided he/she is admitted to the institution and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules."

The NCAA regulations on this are pretty well known, so I'm not sure why Stanford needs to reply on this case in particular.


footballer
Stanford
on Dec 25, 2009 at 1:53 am
footballer, Stanford
on Dec 25, 2009 at 1:53 am
Like this comment

yeah committing means signing a letter of *intent*

Intent in no way means that he is getting in, although his strong academic record combined with his athletic success make him the type of well-rounded candidate that should get into Stanford.

what is it with these academic faculty types always wanting to tear apart their schools top athletic programs? Same thing happened with Duke lacrosse a few years back...


Stanford/Woodberry alum
another community
on Jan 1, 2010 at 1:24 pm
Stanford/Woodberry alum, another community
on Jan 1, 2010 at 1:24 pm
Like this comment

Glad to see that the Stanford community still can get its panties in a knot over seemingly nothing at all. First, the kid may have been misquoted or misunderstood (Gee, has the media ever screwed up and misquoted anyone before?) Second, all you have to do is look and see how rarely academically prestigious Division I schools like Stanford, Vanderbilt, Cal and Rice win national titles in football and men's basketball to realize that they obviously require a higher degree of literacy from their applicants/players than most schools. Third, take a look at the majors these kids have. While most other schools' high-profile football players are majoring in "Criminal Justice" -- likely meaning they've been arrested a few times and have learned the names of some good defense attorneys -- you've got guys like Toby Gerhart majoring in substantive subjects like Economics. Lastly, after watching Big Game and the Sun Bowl, it's clear Stanford still needs all the good football players it can get, so in the immortal words of Sgt. Hulka, "Lighten up, Francis".


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