News

No raises for Palo Alto teachers, staff this year

But average employee health cost rises from $12,125 to $12,865, district says

Except for scheduled seniority increases, teachers and staff in Palo Alto schools will get no pay raise this year under tentative agreements reached by labor unions and the school district.

The board of education tonight (Tuesday) will discuss the draft agreements, reached by the Palo Alto Unified School District with the Palo Alto Educators Association (PAEA), representing teachers, and the California School Employees Association (CSEA), representing non-management staff.

"There wasn't a whole lot to discuss this year because of the economy being what it is," PAEA negotiator and teacher Triona Gogarty said.

The unions compromised on their earlier bid to hold the line on health co-payments, Gogarty said.

"We took an increase in copays in order to keep the costs flat," she said.

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Nonetheless, district contributions to employee benefits will go up this year, from an average of $12,125 per employee to $12,865, according to Scott Bowers, assistant superintendent for human resources.

Gogarty said that increase is covered by a union concession from last year which allowed employees to opt out of district health coverage in return for $250 a month, thus saving money for the district.

In other business Tuesday, the school board will discuss findings of a poll taken in October probing voters' attitudes toward renewal of the school district's $493-a-year parcel tax, which expires in 2011.

The current tax, supported by 74 percent of voters in June 2005, raises $9.3 million a year -- about six percent of the district's $154 million operating budget.

The board also will hear a proposal to extend certain summer school classes to six weeks for five hours a day, allowing students to cover a year's worth of material.

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In addition, the Citizens' Oversight Committee for the $378 million Measure A facilities bond passed last year will present its first annual report.

The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. in the board room of school district headquarters, 25 Churchill Ave.

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No raises for Palo Alto teachers, staff this year

But average employee health cost rises from $12,125 to $12,865, district says

by / Palo Alto Online

Uploaded: Tue, Nov 10, 2009, 9:19 am

Except for scheduled seniority increases, teachers and staff in Palo Alto schools will get no pay raise this year under tentative agreements reached by labor unions and the school district.

The board of education tonight (Tuesday) will discuss the draft agreements, reached by the Palo Alto Unified School District with the Palo Alto Educators Association (PAEA), representing teachers, and the California School Employees Association (CSEA), representing non-management staff.

"There wasn't a whole lot to discuss this year because of the economy being what it is," PAEA negotiator and teacher Triona Gogarty said.

The unions compromised on their earlier bid to hold the line on health co-payments, Gogarty said.

"We took an increase in copays in order to keep the costs flat," she said.

Nonetheless, district contributions to employee benefits will go up this year, from an average of $12,125 per employee to $12,865, according to Scott Bowers, assistant superintendent for human resources.

Gogarty said that increase is covered by a union concession from last year which allowed employees to opt out of district health coverage in return for $250 a month, thus saving money for the district.

In other business Tuesday, the school board will discuss findings of a poll taken in October probing voters' attitudes toward renewal of the school district's $493-a-year parcel tax, which expires in 2011.

The current tax, supported by 74 percent of voters in June 2005, raises $9.3 million a year -- about six percent of the district's $154 million operating budget.

The board also will hear a proposal to extend certain summer school classes to six weeks for five hours a day, allowing students to cover a year's worth of material.

In addition, the Citizens' Oversight Committee for the $378 million Measure A facilities bond passed last year will present its first annual report.

The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. in the board room of school district headquarters, 25 Churchill Ave.

Comments

Janie
Walter Hays School
on Nov 10, 2009 at 9:04 pm
Janie, Walter Hays School
on Nov 10, 2009 at 9:04 pm

PLEASE EVERYONE GIVE TO PiE!!!

Our schools are in such trouble! Please, please open your checkbooks and give to Parents in Educations. Palo Alto Schools are suffering. I hear they are looking at furlough days for the teachers next year. This is horrible! Give what you can!


neighbor
another community
on Nov 11, 2009 at 9:37 am
neighbor, another community
on Nov 11, 2009 at 9:37 am

Perhaps Palo Alto should eliminate the city sculpture budget for a few years so that they can invest in the city's services and CHILDREN instead. I guess PA is more interested in image.


Approve
South of Midtown
on Nov 11, 2009 at 10:38 am
Approve, South of Midtown
on Nov 11, 2009 at 10:38 am

This is appropriate policy because the cost of living index hasn't increased this year.


Where should we get the money from?
Meadow Park
on Nov 11, 2009 at 4:35 pm
Where should we get the money from?, Meadow Park
on Nov 11, 2009 at 4:35 pm

In the industry, there haven't been too many salary raises and bonuses in the past two years (longer for some). Education is an industry like any other .. they get affected by the economy as well .. live with it !

There are quite a few families in Palo Alto, where one (or some cases both) parents are out of a job ..donations to PiE should be expected to decrease due to this. Lets just be realistic .. there is no money fountain in the backyard.


Donald
South of Midtown
on Nov 11, 2009 at 7:25 pm
Donald, South of Midtown
on Nov 11, 2009 at 7:25 pm

It would help if people could keep track of the difference between the City and the School District. I see that the comment on the sculpture budget was made by someone from a different community, so let me clarify this. The City of Palo Alto's budget is completely separate from that of the Palo Alto Unified School District.


Results of Envy Politics
Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Nov 12, 2009 at 8:28 am
Results of Envy Politics, Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Nov 12, 2009 at 8:28 am

Agree with Where to get Money from?

We have finally won the battle to decrease that ever widening rich-poor gap.

Unfortunately, it seems we accomplished this by by eliminating the richest of us, who paid the most taxes that paid the social services and education, and donated the most for the icing on the cake services.

This is what happens with envy-politics and policies... Teach your children to learn from this and not repeat our mistakes when they grow up.


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