News

It's Klein, Price, Holman, Shepherd and Scharff

Four veteran volunteers to join one political newcomer on Palo Alto City Council

Palo Altans chose experienced community-involvement veterans over political neophytes Tuesday, electing Larry Klein, Gail Price, Karen Holman and Nancy Shepherd to the City Council by comfortable margins.

Attorney Greg Scharff appeared poised to claim the fifth and final open spot on the nine-member council. With all 39 precincts reporting but hundreds of absentee ballots left to count, Scharff was leading realtor Leon Leong by 3,912 to 3,480 votes.

Palo Alto voters also rejected Measure A, the city's proposed business-license tax, voting it down by a comfortable 56.42 percent to 43.58 percent, according to the final but unofficial Tuesday-night count.

In electing Klein, Price, Holman and Shepherd to the council, voters made clear their preference for established veterans over political newcomers. Klein, the only incumbent in the field, is heading for his fourth term on the council, while Price previously served on the Palo Alto Board of Education.

Holman is currently in her eighth year on the Planning and Transportation Commission.

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All five victors took early leads on the strength of mail-in ballots and then watched their margins of victory expand as new vote results filtered in. By about 11 p.m., the Santa Clara County's Registrar of Voters had counted all 39 precincts.

The five winning candidates beat out (in order) Leong, Dan Dykwel, Corey Levens, John Hackmann, Brian Steen, Timothy Gray, Chris Gaither, Mark Weiss and Victor Frost.

Klein, who had served as Palo Alto mayor three times over the course of his council career, said he was "pleased and honored" by the voters' support. With his victory all but assured, he said he looked forward to remaining on the council and helping to tackle the city's looming budget challenges.

"It's tough, but I've been doing it long enough to know what it entails," said Klein, whose 5,275 votes led the field.

Price, who finished just behind Klein with 5,233 votes, said she viewed voters' support as a sign of their appreciation for her service on the school board.

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Price, a former city planner in Sunnyvale, said she expects the contract dispute between city administration and the city's largest labor union to remain one of the most pressing issues of the coming year. She said she would like the city to create a joint committee of administration and labor leaders who could meet regularly to discuss compensation and other labor-related issues.

"We have a lot work to do here as far as maintaining relationships with the city employees," Price said.

Holman, who received 5,212 votes as of Tuesday night, also chalked up her victory to experience. Over the course of her campaign, Holman has won the support of most current council members and the backing of broad coalition of neighborhood leaders. As a member of the Planning and Transportation Commission, she has been a staunch critic of most dense, new housing developments and a leading proponent for more transparency in the policy-making process.

"People who have been watching the Planning and Transportation Commission for the past eight years know they can depend on me because they know my positions are on the Comprehensive Plan and the all the important zoning issues," Holman

said.

Shepherd, a longtime volunteer at the Palo Alto school district, finished fourth with 4,378 votes. Like Price and Holman, she has a long record of civic service and endorsements from dozens of local and state officials

Scharff, meanwhile, took an early lead over Leong and watched it gradually grow as the evening progressed. Despite being a political newcomer,

Scharff led the candidate field in cash raised and watched his campaign generate the most momentum in the final weeks leading up to Tuesday.

"I'm thrilled about the confidence the people of Palo Alto have in me," Scharff said after ballots from all 39 precincts were counted. "I think the most important thing that I showed during my campaign was that I am willing to sit down with people and listen."

The four newcomers will replace Mayor Drekmeier and Councilman John Barton, both of whom have chosen not to seek another term. Vice Mayor Jack Morton and Councilwoman Yoriko Kishimoto were termed out.

The new council terms begin in early January.

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It's Klein, Price, Holman, Shepherd and Scharff

Four veteran volunteers to join one political newcomer on Palo Alto City Council

by / Palo Alto Online

Uploaded: Wed, Nov 4, 2009, 1:44 am

Palo Altans chose experienced community-involvement veterans over political neophytes Tuesday, electing Larry Klein, Gail Price, Karen Holman and Nancy Shepherd to the City Council by comfortable margins.

Attorney Greg Scharff appeared poised to claim the fifth and final open spot on the nine-member council. With all 39 precincts reporting but hundreds of absentee ballots left to count, Scharff was leading realtor Leon Leong by 3,912 to 3,480 votes.

Palo Alto voters also rejected Measure A, the city's proposed business-license tax, voting it down by a comfortable 56.42 percent to 43.58 percent, according to the final but unofficial Tuesday-night count.

In electing Klein, Price, Holman and Shepherd to the council, voters made clear their preference for established veterans over political newcomers. Klein, the only incumbent in the field, is heading for his fourth term on the council, while Price previously served on the Palo Alto Board of Education.

Holman is currently in her eighth year on the Planning and Transportation Commission.

All five victors took early leads on the strength of mail-in ballots and then watched their margins of victory expand as new vote results filtered in. By about 11 p.m., the Santa Clara County's Registrar of Voters had counted all 39 precincts.

The five winning candidates beat out (in order) Leong, Dan Dykwel, Corey Levens, John Hackmann, Brian Steen, Timothy Gray, Chris Gaither, Mark Weiss and Victor Frost.

Klein, who had served as Palo Alto mayor three times over the course of his council career, said he was "pleased and honored" by the voters' support. With his victory all but assured, he said he looked forward to remaining on the council and helping to tackle the city's looming budget challenges.

"It's tough, but I've been doing it long enough to know what it entails," said Klein, whose 5,275 votes led the field.

Price, who finished just behind Klein with 5,233 votes, said she viewed voters' support as a sign of their appreciation for her service on the school board.

Price, a former city planner in Sunnyvale, said she expects the contract dispute between city administration and the city's largest labor union to remain one of the most pressing issues of the coming year. She said she would like the city to create a joint committee of administration and labor leaders who could meet regularly to discuss compensation and other labor-related issues.

"We have a lot work to do here as far as maintaining relationships with the city employees," Price said.

Holman, who received 5,212 votes as of Tuesday night, also chalked up her victory to experience. Over the course of her campaign, Holman has won the support of most current council members and the backing of broad coalition of neighborhood leaders. As a member of the Planning and Transportation Commission, she has been a staunch critic of most dense, new housing developments and a leading proponent for more transparency in the policy-making process.

"People who have been watching the Planning and Transportation Commission for the past eight years know they can depend on me because they know my positions are on the Comprehensive Plan and the all the important zoning issues," Holman

said.

Shepherd, a longtime volunteer at the Palo Alto school district, finished fourth with 4,378 votes. Like Price and Holman, she has a long record of civic service and endorsements from dozens of local and state officials

Scharff, meanwhile, took an early lead over Leong and watched it gradually grow as the evening progressed. Despite being a political newcomer,

Scharff led the candidate field in cash raised and watched his campaign generate the most momentum in the final weeks leading up to Tuesday.

"I'm thrilled about the confidence the people of Palo Alto have in me," Scharff said after ballots from all 39 precincts were counted. "I think the most important thing that I showed during my campaign was that I am willing to sit down with people and listen."

The four newcomers will replace Mayor Drekmeier and Councilman John Barton, both of whom have chosen not to seek another term. Vice Mayor Jack Morton and Councilwoman Yoriko Kishimoto were termed out.

The new council terms begin in early January.

Comments

JFP
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:07 am
JFP, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:07 am
Like this comment

Well, we now know the city employees will get all they want in their contract negotiations.


W.L.
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:16 am
W.L., Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:16 am
Like this comment

I don't think so. Politician have always used labor to win elections.
and once in office they forget who help them. I am not worried that the workers will get all they want. I am worried that the streets will never get fixed. Or they will continue to cut down trees when ever they want!


Civitas
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:52 am
Civitas, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:52 am
Like this comment

Too bad that the community did not write in Marvin, Wayne Martin, Pat, and Lineman for City Council. Along with Victor Frost, those four would have made real change happen at City Hall.


PA man
College Terrace
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:54 am
PA man, College Terrace
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:54 am
Like this comment


Ha! Saying experience won out covers up the real story. It was a one issue race, folks: Gender! Taking one spot out for shoe-in Larry Klein, women won 80% of the available council vacancies.


Marvin
Charleston Gardens
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:55 am
Marvin, Charleston Gardens
on Nov 4, 2009 at 7:55 am
Like this comment

Yes, too bad. You sound a bit bitter, Civitas. Do not tell me you actually are happy that some of those candidates won? With the re-election of Larry Klein and the addition of Karen Holman, we are in for more of the same


SOS
College Terrace
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:22 am
SOS, College Terrace
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:22 am
Like this comment

Oh boy, Palo Alto will not change for a few more years.


Resident
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:29 am
Resident, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:29 am
Like this comment

The reelection of Klein is incredible! Who are these people who voted for him? Do they really want any improvements in the way this City is run?


Civitas
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:30 am
Civitas, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:30 am
Like this comment

[Post removed by Palo Alto Online staff.]


Dan
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:36 am
Dan, Old Palo Alto
on Nov 4, 2009 at 8:36 am
Like this comment

It's amazing that 350 people voted for Victor Frost. Who are those people? It would have been better for them to give him $25 each so he could be set up with food for a few years and stop harrasing passers-by for change. That would be a positive move.


A Noun Ea Mus
Professorville
on Nov 4, 2009 at 9:01 am
A Noun Ea Mus, Professorville
on Nov 4, 2009 at 9:01 am
Like this comment

Two out of the three City Council candidates whom opponents and right wingers here tried to label as Union Stooges because they accepted SEIU endorsments got elected. I don't consider Price and Shepherd to be such, but when a smear campaign fails......]

Meanwhile, what does Gail Price exactly mean when she is quoted as saying..

"Price, a former city planner in Sunnyvale, said she expects the contract dispute between city administration and the city's largest labor union to remain one of the most pressing issues of the coming year. She said she would like the city to create a joint committee of administration and labor leaders who could meet regularly to discuss compensation and other labor-related issues.

"We have a lot work to do here as far as maintaining relationships with the city employees," Price said."

So we have an imposed contract which has apparently not been responded to fully yet by SEIU/City Workers. We have a legal challenge to the CPA as regards their refusal to negotiate in good faith (and the area wide price fixing scheme provides evidence of such ala motive at least), and now this proposal by Council Member Price.

Is this an attempt to open real negotiations? Or an olive branch such that perhaps when the economy picks up even more that the previous benefits may be restored?

Otherwise it's kind of like a guy and gal got stranded on an island, they are rescued and the guy says "necessity mandated I rape her" and the judge then suggests that the guy and gal meet regularly to discuss gender issues.


George
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 4, 2009 at 9:19 am
George, Old Palo Alto
on Nov 4, 2009 at 9:19 am
Like this comment

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.

The voters in Palo Alto are truly insane. Our town in governed by left wing automatons. All that matters is how we feel about one another. There is no truth. Just a state of being. Kumbaiah. Green, peace, budget deficits, more unneeded city programs, higher taxes, green, peace, more programs, love, diversity, green buildings, green roads, green cars, green love, green air, green hair, green happiness, green bananas, and green deficits.


Chris
Barron Park
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:01 am
Chris, Barron Park
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:01 am
Like this comment

Great, no change, no new ideas, more debt, more poorly planned development in neighborhoods where council members do not live. I didn't agree with all of the views of the candidates, but I valued diversity. Apparently, we are not as liberal in considering new or diverse ideas as some elitist Palo Alto residents like to think. Operate within our means! Make the tough choices of cutting services and jobs while considering investment for the future!!!


Timothy Gray
Charleston Meadows
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:26 am
Timothy Gray, Charleston Meadows
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:26 am
Like this comment

Big Marketing budgets may have won the election, but we don't have to be the victim. The people are the government and we can collectively "govern from the outside in."

Here is a solid starting point that we can start singing as a "community chorus", and if enough people join the choir, we can drown out the noise of the special interest that want to keep tapping into our bank account.

It is time to inventory and then prioritize City programs and expenditures. Then reduce spending starting with the lowest priorities. Or...carry on business as usual where we bring up each service as a separate topic and discuss them in City Council meetings that will last late into the middle of the night and continue to let the vocal minority will get its way.

We must stop trying to patch the budget: we need structural spending decreases. Stop, inventory, prioritize, cut from the bottom of the list, and get on with good business practices that will restore balance. Combined this with restructured city employee benefits that are more aligned with private sector benefits, and we will break free from an endless financial crisis.

This clarity might be rejected by those who want to manipulate for the benefit of narrow interests. Let's have some real transparency. We cannot accept anything less.

Citizen Gray (formerly known as Candidate Tim Gray)


A Noun Ea Mus
Professorville
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:30 am
A Noun Ea Mus, Professorville
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:30 am
Like this comment

Make the tough choices of cutting services and jobs, but not the tough choice for even a rudimentary business tax?

So in addition to the above the city has lost a bit of street cred as Measure A was spun as "we all will do our part". Yeah so much for that.

Meanwhile, some union members have just won a big one...

20 per cent wage increase over the next 4 years, plus no decrease in health care benefits.

Web Link

And people say unions are passe?


Timothy Gray
Charleston Meadows
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:20 am
Timothy Gray, Charleston Meadows
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:20 am
Like this comment

Palo Alto has been told to get its financial house in order before putting its hands in our pockets.

The message to live within our means is clear. This is the same message that big Foundations send to those requesting grants: "Prove your fiscal responsibility before we turn over additional money."

The bottom line: People will pay for added value, but they do not want funds used to make up for a lack of discipline. We cannot accept anything less than the City implementing long-term structural spending adjustments. Then, a well-crafted fee structure that is clear about the value created will be welcomed by the voters.

It is the same rule I apply to our children: the chores must be done before I will turn over the allowance. This is a well-tested standard.

Citizen Gray (FKA Candidate Gray)


A Noun Ea Mus
Professorville
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:42 am
A Noun Ea Mus, Professorville
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:42 am
Like this comment

"Palo Alto has been told to get its financial house in order before putting its hands in our pockets."

Nice try at spin, but the electoral facts hardly support such a stretch.

Ugh you went down in flames. While I hardly think the voting was a referendum per se, 2 out of the 3 candidates endorsed by AFL-CIO (SEIU?) won. And Corey Levins wasn't way down there on the list with you either. You beat Gaither and Weiss,... oh and Frost.

With all the fanfare whipped up about City Council candidates accepting SEIU endorsement, if your take on it had a shred of credibility then the winners and loser would be a bit different heh?

And when one reads the opposition to Measure A some if it purports to be because of the "bad writing", but the overall avalanche seems to be outright umbrage that business is taxed at all.

The analogy of CPA being the parents and the city workers being kids "asking" for an allowance (like the city "asked" the union for concessions) is a bit off. The city workers are adults and unionized workers.

Measure A failed AFTER the city launched it's official attempt to impose it's conditions. Measure A was never touted as something to pay city workers what they were striving to get in negotiations. Quite the opposite as the supporters of Measure A touted it as a way to justify their "negotiation" stance.

Time for just desserts!


pat
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:48 am
pat, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:48 am
Like this comment

Timoth Gray says, 'Here is a solid starting point that we can start singing as a "community chorus", and if enough people join the choir, we can drown out the noise of the special interest that want to keep tapping into our bank account.'

You're living in a dream world, Timothy. Many of us have been advocating for years to "...prioritize City programs and expenditures. Then reduce spending starting with the lowest priorities,..." as you recommend.

If anyone cared, if anyone was listening, do you think Klein would have been re-elected? Would Price and Shepherd have been elected? Both were in favor of the business tax and are supported by the unions.

Meet the new boss -- same as the old boss.


Timothy Gray
Charleston Meadows
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:55 am
Timothy Gray, Charleston Meadows
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:55 am
Like this comment

To the above post:

The Government of Palo Alto is the child in the analogy above -- I would never discount or slight the great workers of our City.

It is clear we both care about Community Service but express it in different ways. Thanks for participating.


Kate
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 4, 2009 at 12:21 pm
Kate, Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 4, 2009 at 12:21 pm
Like this comment

What is REALLY sad and shocking is that less than 10,000 residents voted out of a claimed 26K eligible voters. And some threw away a vote on Victor Frost . Why are so many so disinterested? Maybe they all feel from experience that it is so useless and the Council and City doesn't listen anyway. I'm beginning to finally think they are so right. "Civic engagement" is a sham.


Civitas
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 12:50 pm
Civitas, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 12:50 pm
Like this comment

Thanks for waking everyone up from dreams of harmony to face the harsh realities of disputation, Pat. Your comments are a bracing gust of brisk, stinging sea air through the porthole of the unworldy cruise ship, "Palo Alto Dream Voyage". Very harsh but very real too.


Low turnout
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 12:56 pm
Low turnout, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 12:56 pm
Like this comment

"What is REALLY sad and shocking is that less than 10,000 residents voted out of a claimed 26K eligible voters." That's because more than 40% of the residents of PA are renters and they don't care.


Renters Do Vote
South of Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 1:14 pm
Renters Do Vote, South of Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 1:14 pm
Like this comment

Excuse me, "Low turnout", but we are a renter household of four voting-age individuals, and we all voted (as we do in every election). Just because one doesn't have enough money to buy a pricey Palo Alto house doesn't mean that one isn't civically engaged.


Evan
Crescent Park
on Nov 4, 2009 at 1:45 pm
Evan, Crescent Park
on Nov 4, 2009 at 1:45 pm
Like this comment

Seriously "Low turnout"? Maybe you should stop judging so harshly. I'm a renter, and I vote in every single election. Just because I don't have the money to buy a $2m house in Palo Alto doesn't mean I don't do my civic duty, even in off years.


Miss the trees on CA Ave.
Gunn High School
on Nov 4, 2009 at 2:05 pm
Miss the trees on CA Ave., Gunn High School
on Nov 4, 2009 at 2:05 pm
Like this comment

Ah, this was a done deal of who was getting into the circle of high muckymucks in the City Council...Sorry to those of you who spent your money trying to vie for a seat....I would have liked to see Victor Frost in there as special advisor to the Council to shake up the bunch...but now I am betting that we will have an "All Agreeable" City Council where there will be no discussions, disagreements, just all the green lights voting for the same agendas..... Typical Palo Alto.


Marie
Crescent Park
on Nov 4, 2009 at 2:21 pm
Marie, Crescent Park
on Nov 4, 2009 at 2:21 pm
Like this comment

Dan, I've never seen Victor Frost harassing anyone for change. He keep it to himself. He just hold his sings. I believe he would have gotten many more votes if the city did not blow his encounter with the other panhandler that apparenlty was trying to get money out of his bucket. The police showed up in no time for him... Incredible! Also the fact that he holds a place in Redwood city may have caused some problems for his campaign. He is a good man and no one can denny that he is a Palo Altan. Just too many side stories to divert his voters.


pat
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 2:24 pm
pat, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 2:24 pm
Like this comment

Thank you, Civitas. I’m usually branded a disgruntled naysayer.

I can’t help wondering how many of us reject the Kool-Aid served on the “Palo Alto Dream Voyage.” Clearly, we’re in the minority.


cc
Southgate
on Nov 4, 2009 at 2:33 pm
cc, Southgate
on Nov 4, 2009 at 2:33 pm
Like this comment

Kool aid? You mean the Jim Jones type or the merry prankster type?


Sam
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 3:14 pm
Sam, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 3:14 pm
Like this comment

"City Manager James Keene said at Monday night's City Council meeting that staff is proposing to transfer $16.8 million from the utility funds to the general fund, down from an earlier plan to transfer $19.6 million, a surge of about $4.5 million above last year's transfer.

The higher transfer would help the city close the projected deficit of $8 million to $10 million in fiscal year 2010.

"This is a commonly used methodology," Keene said Monday, explaining the transfer.""

Web Link


The utility fund will be manipulated to provide whatever mainey is needed to preserve services. With the current and newly elected council, you can bet on it.

For a short review of how these things happen, check out this city memo on the subject: Web Link



Kate
Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 4, 2009 at 3:45 pm
Kate, Duveneck/St. Francis
on Nov 4, 2009 at 3:45 pm
Like this comment

I was wrong. According to yesterday's Palo Alto Weekly,

"Palo Alto has 36,300 eligible voters. About one-quarter of them opted not to vote by mail and had the chance to vote in person today." That means that the percentage of residents actually voting was less than I thought. That is really sad, sadder saddest. How do we fight back?


Civitas
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 3:50 pm
Civitas, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 3:50 pm
Like this comment

I think that somehow the clearcut of California Avenue trees, the shock and timinig of this action, contributed to a negative opinion by many voters of how wisely any new money raisd by Measure A would be spent. Fairly or unfairly, what was done on California Avenue could not have happened at a worse time for supporters of a new tax in Palo Alto.


Bill
Barron Park
on Nov 4, 2009 at 4:38 pm
Bill, Barron Park
on Nov 4, 2009 at 4:38 pm
Like this comment

I hope that Price and Shepherd are not SEIU stooges as implied in the Wednesday Dail Post article - page 19, first paragraph - "With the election of Price and Shepherd, the unions will have four of nine votes."

I'm an optimist and believe all council members will vote on the facts, not on their hidden biases. I know. I said I was an optimist.


Midtowner
Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 4:55 pm
Midtowner, Midtown
on Nov 4, 2009 at 4:55 pm
Like this comment

Well, for sure Price and Shepherd must have won their election thanks to union money. The unions are the ones who paid for the mailers that apparently influenced voters... How about the lawn signs? Were they also union financed?

Are they now going to owe the unions? It would seem so.

It seems to me it will be business as usual in Palo Alto.

And probably there will be more taxes on us average citizens, if only in the form of higher utility rates, now that the business license tax was turned down.

A sad day.


jb
Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Nov 4, 2009 at 5:49 pm
jb, Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Nov 4, 2009 at 5:49 pm
Like this comment

Disinterested: Having no interest or claim in the issue, no conflict of interest.

The voters who did not vote were "uninterested" not interested, bored with.

But Good English is going down in flames as is precise enunciated meaning.


Anon
Walter Hays School
on Nov 4, 2009 at 6:00 pm
Anon, Walter Hays School
on Nov 4, 2009 at 6:00 pm
Like this comment

Not everyone votes on labor and union issues alone. There areca lot of other issues at stake in this town that people think about when voting. ABAG, HSR, city/school cooperation, etc.


chris
University South
on Nov 4, 2009 at 6:43 pm
chris, University South
on Nov 4, 2009 at 6:43 pm
Like this comment

The voters followed the wishes of the Palo Alto Weekly. All of their endorsements won.


chris
University South
on Nov 4, 2009 at 6:46 pm
chris, University South
on Nov 4, 2009 at 6:46 pm
Like this comment

The person who said fewer than 10,000 voted is way off. As of Wednesday afternoon, almost 15,000 ballots have been counted, and according to the Weekly, about 20% of the votes remain to be counted.


Mil
Old Palo Alto
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:23 pm
Mil, Old Palo Alto
on Nov 4, 2009 at 10:23 pm
Like this comment

Well we have to accept the outcome. The citizens of Palo Alto have spoken. The votes are final. As civic minded voters we could always ask for a recall election if we feel that the elected officials are not performing as expected or they are compromising their integrity. Do you remember what happened to Governor Davis? The citizenry always has the last word. This is called democracy.


WP
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:03 pm
WP, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:03 pm
Like this comment

"Well, for sure Price and Shepherd must have won their election thanks to union money." Well maybe, but Price and Shepherd were the only two women on the ballot and women tend to support other women which is the more likely reason they were elected.

We were all aware that at the last City Council election four men were elected, making Yoriko Kishimoto the only woman on the City Council. I know from talking with my female friends they wanted to get more women onto the City Council.


WP
Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:04 pm
WP, Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Nov 4, 2009 at 11:04 pm
Like this comment

Sorry Karen Holman was elected too.


Poll watcher
Evergreen Park
on Nov 5, 2009 at 9:56 am
Poll watcher, Evergreen Park
on Nov 5, 2009 at 9:56 am
Like this comment

This story is obsolete. The rankings changed Wednesday afternoon.


Marvin
Charleston Gardens
on Nov 5, 2009 at 10:03 am
Marvin, Charleston Gardens
on Nov 5, 2009 at 10:03 am
Like this comment

Read Diane Diamond's commentary in today's Daily Post about the election. Interesting analysis about Larry Klein, the business tax and unions.


Civitas
Midtown
on Nov 5, 2009 at 10:50 am
Civitas, Midtown
on Nov 5, 2009 at 10:50 am
Like this comment

Real change is needed from the top to the bottom and including the middle.


Jake
another community
on Nov 5, 2009 at 4:11 pm
Jake, another community
on Nov 5, 2009 at 4:11 pm
Like this comment

Diamond's article is just her opinion, she's openly anti labor and anti union.
Contrary to her opinion, contributing money towards a candidates running for office does not buy votes.
At best labor just hopes that the elected official will at least meet with them when an important item comes up. Buying face time at best.
Were not talking huge dollars here in peoples pockets. After the Council term is over, Labor or the Union does not have some $300,000 a year job waiting for the former Council member.
Not like corporate America, where shady deals occur every day. Thats where one is more inclined to see integrity problems.


Peter K. MUELLER
Barron Park
on Nov 6, 2009 at 12:07 pm
Peter K. MUELLER, Barron Park
on Nov 6, 2009 at 12:07 pm
Like this comment

The voter turn-out of just under 40% deserves analysis by writers of Palo Alto OnLine.

I recall reading somewhere that in the first democracy thousands of years ago in Athens, Greece, only about 30% of the population was allowed to vote because the others had the status of slave. We put ourselves figuratively into such a position when we dont vote.

On the other hand, to participate as a responsible voter requires substantial time commitments to study the issues and the candidates independently. To really understand the background and character of 15 candidates is a major task among all of our other obligations. For most citizens to devote that much time requires giving up minimally several hours of entertainment and relaxation.

If we cant devote that much time, is it better to vote simply on the basis of vague perceptions or is it wiser to not vote & simply rely on our fellow citizens who do trouble to study and thereby avoid inadvertently doing harm?

I personally did study several hours, exercised judgement and voted. I am also among those who would have preferred a greater fraction of new faces among the experienced slate voted in this time. Nevertheless, we did get a group of dedicated individuals who deserve our respect, trust, attention and comments during the course of their tenure of service to us.


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