News

Stanford professor wins Stockholm Water Prize

Perry L. McCarty, Stanford professor emeritus of civil and environmental engineering, has won the 2007 Stockholm Water Prize for his pioneering work in the design and operation of water and wastewater systems.

The prize was announced Thursday in the Swedish embassy in Washington, D.C. It includes a $150,000 award and a crystal sculpture.

The award will be presented to McCarty Aug. 16 in Stockholm by King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden.

McCarty joined the Stanford faculty in 1962.

He is known for designing wastewater processes that use anaerobic (oxygen-less) treatment systems that rely on chemical reactions by microbes.

What's local journalism worth to you?

Support Palo Alto Online for as little as $5/month.

Learn more

"Professor McCarty has defined the field of environmental biotechnology that is the basis for small-scale and large-scale pollution control and safe drinking water systems," according to the citation from the awards committee.

The Stockholm Water Prize is presented annually for education, research and water-management innovations.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

Sign up

— Don Kazak

Follow Palo Alto Online and the Palo Alto Weekly on Twitter @paloaltoweekly, Facebook and on Instagram @paloaltoonline for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

Stanford professor wins Stockholm Water Prize

Uploaded: Fri, Mar 23, 2007, 9:00 am

Perry L. McCarty, Stanford professor emeritus of civil and environmental engineering, has won the 2007 Stockholm Water Prize for his pioneering work in the design and operation of water and wastewater systems.

The prize was announced Thursday in the Swedish embassy in Washington, D.C. It includes a $150,000 award and a crystal sculpture.

The award will be presented to McCarty Aug. 16 in Stockholm by King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden.

McCarty joined the Stanford faculty in 1962.

He is known for designing wastewater processes that use anaerobic (oxygen-less) treatment systems that rely on chemical reactions by microbes.

"Professor McCarty has defined the field of environmental biotechnology that is the basis for small-scale and large-scale pollution control and safe drinking water systems," according to the citation from the awards committee.

The Stockholm Water Prize is presented annually for education, research and water-management innovations.

— Don Kazak

Comments

Post a comment

Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.