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Toddling Through the Silicon Valley

By Cheryl Bac

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About this blog: I'm a wife, stay-at-home mom, home cook, marathon runner, and PhD. I recently moved to the Silicon Valley after completing my PhD in Social Psychology and becoming a mother one month apart. Before that, I ran seven marathons incl...  (More)

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Back to Magical Bridge Playground

Uploaded: Mar 24, 2021
Earlier this month our family had a wonderful time playing at Magical Bridge Playground. This was our first time visiting the playground since Covid and we cannot wait to return. I was a bit hesitant to visit Magical Bridge with the restrictions in place. I assumed the wait would be very long, that the 30 minute time limit would be too short, and that it would still feel crowded and hard to stay socially distant; however, I was pleasantly surprised. The volunteers ran everything very smoothly.

As we entered, we were told there would be about a 10 minute wait. When we reached the line another volunteer thanked everyone for waiting patiently. Once it was our turn to play, the playground felt almost empty. With only 55 people, our kids were amazed at all they could do. No wait for the slides. No wait for the swings or the merry-go-round. Everyone was great about wearing masks and social distancing. As expected, it was hard to leave after only 30 minutes, but after we left our kids enjoyed playing at all of the other playgrounds at Mitchell Park.

We hope to go back to Magical Bridge Playground soon. Thank you Magical Bridge Playground volunteers for helping keep this playground open and safe for everyone to enjoy.
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Comments

 +   3 people like this
Posted by Jill Asher, a resident of Crescent Park,
on Mar 25, 2021 at 8:35 am

Jill Asher is a registered user.

Cheryl, Thank you so much for the lovely write-up about Magical Bridge Playground and we are delighted to welcome you (and everyone) back to play at our very special place. As a friendly reminder, please visit our website that references all our safety protocols. Our hope is that within the upcoming months, we'll be able to increase the number of visitors at any one given time -- and maybe later this summer or fall, we can bring back our concert series and activities. Link to our website: http://www.magicalbridge.org With gratitude, Jill Asher (and Team Magical Bridge)


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Cheryl Bac, a Palo Alto Online blogger,
on Mar 25, 2021 at 6:23 pm

Cheryl Bac is a registered user.

Jill Asher - Thank you for reading and for the exciting update about plans for this summer and fall! We are excited to return to Magical Bridge Playground again soon.


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Alvin, a resident of Professorville,
on Mar 27, 2021 at 10:12 pm

Alvin is a registered user.

I am also a parent and reject what you're saying here including your obvious virtue signaling. My kids are taught to never fear a virus - what's the point, as viruses can't be stopped, are endemic like TB, HIV, flu, other cold viruses, chickenpox, etc., and provide long term natural immunity via infection - to never wear a mask (for obvious physical, social, and mental harm), and to always question anything the government and media say. I want my kids to play with their friends, unmasked, and live like its 2019. With all due respect, I believe you (and most Palo Alto parents that I see) are inflicting long-term damage on your children by raising them to fear each other, the world, and the air we breathe. Children are virtually immune to Sars-CoV-2, rarely if ever infect adults, and have more chance of being severely injured or killed in playground accident, bicycle accident, drowning in pool, or by seasonal influenza infection than by Sars-CoV-2. There is no scientific evidence behind 3 or 6 foot distancing and the evidence on mask effectiveness is extremely weak beginning only in middle of 2020 with a few associational studies vs 40 years of solid research, including random control trials, proving ineffectiveness of masks.


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Whitey McWhiterson, a resident of Midtown,
on Mar 31, 2021 at 11:30 am

Whitey McWhiterson is a registered user.

Man, I wish Alvin could take out a few obvious mistakes (e.g., "if ever", masks don't help, always question everything the government and media says--instead of 'almost everything'!), because there is a lot he said that warrants consideration. The truth is probably closer to him than to the max lock-down folks who think they are still being anti-trump and 'holy'. A good compromise is probably Austin, Texas, where most people wore masks and most things were open. (leaving the morbidly obese, very old, and comorbid disease people to reasonably take special precautions). Living like Santa Clara County has done the past year is FAR FAR more conservative than Austin Texas, in fact, it's far more conservative than Alvin here. I agree.


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Bystander, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood,
on Mar 31, 2021 at 1:43 pm

Bystander is a registered user.

I was watching Jordan Peterson, a clinical psychologist, talking about children's development. He was stating that children learn socialization skills and by the age of 2 show definite character traits. If these are good traits, they can be passed on to their peers, if they are bad traits, then mixing with peers usually corrects them. It is a type of herd mentality or herd immunity process. If these bad traits are not corrected by peers by the age of 4, then they are not likely to be self corrected by the peer group. (I paraphrased what I heard him say). The old adage, "all the things I needed to learn about life I learned in kindergarten" sharing, taking turns, waiting for the time to speak, waiting for the time to eat, listening to the other person before speaking, etc. etc. are all things that we don't think of when we prevent young children from mixing. Socialization skills are important lessons and are generally taught from peer groups and not parents or other adults. Children who have been isolated from peers and that includes those with siblings, really need to be mixing socially in normal settings. Teaching children to fear other people is not a good lesson for them to learn and will be something difficult for them to unlearn. Normal childhood interactions are so very important for the preschool age group as well as school age. I am so pleased when I see children playing together in the park. It is important. I hope that this Covid generation can cope without the normal interactions of sharing toys and problem solving together without too much adult intervention. Our children need to be children. Otherwise, society will be paying the cost in future years.


 +  Like this comment
Posted by Cheryl Bac, a Palo Alto Online blogger,
on Apr 1, 2021 at 9:46 am

Cheryl Bac is a registered user.

Alvin, Whitey and Bystander - Thank you all for sharing your concerns about how the past year has negatively affected children’s development.

It is heartbreaking to think about all of the activities kids missed out on this year and how rapidly their lives changed. I am very thankful that Magical Bridge Playground is open and that kids have the opportunity to play, run around, and enjoy all that it has to offer. From the stage to the slides to the musical harp it is such a treat to visit.


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