I am bored. Are you? | An Alternative View | Diana Diamond | Palo Alto Online |

Local Blogs

An Alternative View

By Diana Diamond

E-mail Diana Diamond

About this blog: So much is right — and wrong — about what is happening in Palo Alto. In this blog I want to discuss all that with you. I know many residents care about this town, and I want to explore our collective interests to help ...  (More)

View all posts from Diana Diamond

I am bored. Are you?

Uploaded: Aug 25, 2020
It's been five months now of self-isolation, thanks to the coronavirus. And I am bored.

It's not that I am not doing things -- like four or five zoom meetings a week, or reading for my book club, or participating in two current events discussion groups, or cooking dinner.

But something is different.

It feels like "Groundhog Day" -- if you saw the movie. Every day is the same -- like yesterday -- or like it will be tomorrow. I am virtually confined in my house, as I struggle to observe the COVID-19 rules. I don't see anyone, and no one has been over my house or backyard or have I gone anywhere. It doesn't even make any difference what day of the week this is. It's the sameness of it all that causes me to proclaim I am bored, because everyday is like every day.

Richard Friedman, a professor of clinical psychiatry, described boredom in a recent op-ed piece in the NYT: "Cooped up in our homes and apartments, we've been stripped of our everyday routine and structure. And without distractions, we are left feeling under stimulated. It is this state of restless desire to do something -- anything! -- without a way of achieving our goal (if we even know what it is) that is the essence of boredom."

Boredom is not depression, psychiatrists said in the research I did for this article, although boredom and depression have some similarities. It is not a disease -- as is depression, or other mental illnesses. But it happens to a lot of people during the coronavirus, similar to what prisoners who are in isolated confinement experience, said Jessica Simes, a sociologist, in her 2019 study on this topic. We are now virtual prisoners in our own homes.

And it's been a double whammy in this area -- we stay inside and worry about getting coronavirus which floats around in insidious ways and now we can't go outside because the smoke from all the nearby fires have caused havoc with the air quality.

Boredom may be my vulnerability. I remember when I was five years old with an unbusy summer before me and I knelt on my father's chair by his desk declaring, "Daddy, I'm bored."

"Why don't you color in your coloring book? "Did that this morning." "Why don't you play with your friend?" "She's not home." "Why don't you go to the store for your mother?" "I did and brought lunch home." "Why don't you listen to your favorite radio programs?" "They're over." My father tried hard each day, and I did too, until September when I happily went off to school."

I never realized as much as now how much social interaction I intrinsically need, how I need to see and talk with friends in person, not just over the phone. Zoom helps, but it's not the same thing.

At first I was embarrassed about admitting I was bored, because it always had a negative connotation, suggesting that I lacked imagination or initiative or wasn't adept at thinking creatively about what I can do. But boredom, I've come to realize, is a condition many of us today are coping with.

Saida Grundy in an article in the Atlantic magazine, said, "Without the fun of social gatherings or the routines of work and school to structure our time, [boredom sets in. That reality has brought scores of people face-to-face ware going through the same thing. Maybe its good if we talk more toe ach other about it, and how agonizing it can feel to be bored for days on end."

So you may ask, and I do too, what do we do about it? Reading yet another book is only a partial escape, but days on end I've been reading books. And watching another movie on TV has less meaning now -- it's just another movie. I guess we can take comfort in the fact that we are not alone with these feelings, others of us.

Friedman ends up suggesting that we "do not dread boredom, but try to use it to our good." He adds that it's a way to rethink whether we are spending our lives in a way to make them more meaningful.

I'm thinking. But I am still bored.

We need your support now more than ever. Can we count on you?

Comments

 +   10 people like this
Posted by jc, a resident of College Terrace,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 2:02 pm

jc is a registered user.

When we were young we lived in a rural area without local playmates. Our mother's response to complaints of boredom was to tell us to go do it somewhere else! It was an invaluable life lesson in figuring out from an early age how to be content being on our own and learning to keep ourselves entertained without being dependent on anyone else.


 +   11 people like this
Posted by Victor Bishop, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 2:34 pm

Victor Bishop is a registered user.

A couple of weeks ago you were calling for a complete and total lockdown. Now you say you are bored? What do you think you would feel with a complete lockdown?

Lobby our county health officer to contact the state about getting off the watchlist. San Mateo county health officer, Scott morrow, has been actively engaging the state trying to help his county. Our health officer seems to be content with continuing the current situation.
After 5+ months it is time to get her knee off of our neck. There are other factors to consider besides the virus" economic, mental health, domestic abuse, disparity in education etc.


 +   6 people like this
Posted by Diana Diamond, a Palo Alto Online blogger,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 3:01 pm

Diana Diamond is a registered user.

Victor --

Yes, I still want a total lockdown because it's the only way to finally control and end this virus -- and then I can go out and see friends and have a normal life again. If we don't have a lockdown, how long then do I have to go through this isolation -- another five, 10,20 months?

Of course I know there are other issues, the economy and people working one of the most important ones. But unless we really control this virus, people will not be able to go back to work, restaurants and stores will not be open, people will continue to be afraid to go out of their houses.

What do you think will happen if we don't shut down and obey all the distancing and masking rules? The virus will just disappear -- as our president has said? I doubt it.


 +   10 people like this
Posted by Victor Bishop, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 3:59 pm

Victor Bishop is a registered user.

“ Yes, I still want a total lockdown because it's the only way to finally control and end this virus -- and then I can go out and see friends and have a normal life again. "

How long should we have a total lockdown for? A week, 6 weeks, 6 months? What happens if that does not work, besides more ruined lives????
You should also,take the time to read up about the virus. A lockdown will note"end" the virus? Do you actually believe the virus will just go away after a total lockdown.
Of course a total lockdown will not happen for a variety of reasons, but I love how you want to destroy the economies of places that have had little to no virus with a lockdown.
In the meantime, we need to make smart decisions regarding what can open. The “indoors are evil" mantra is wrong. Bars should not be opened , but other businesses should be allowed to open. For an organizations that claims to rely on data, our county health officials are pretty ignorant.
Web Link


 +   4 people like this
Posted by Steven Goldstein, a resident of Old Mountain View,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 4:11 pm

Steven Goldstein is a registered user.

Unfortunately, there was a recent VERIFIED report that one infected by COVID was reinfected asymptomatic. This means a person can become a carrier multiple times.

And now the FDA is pulling back on how effective convalescent treatment can be not as effective as it was first reported.

Yes, this is the worst case situation regarding health, both physical and psychological, economic, and social impacts. We were warned for decades to get prepared for it.

No we have to act on the reality of the situation, and we have to work together in a most unusual way. And the smoke is not helping either, we are stuck indoors to avoid being subject to more lung damages due to the smoke.

I wish I had a miracle, i don't. We just have to cooperate and provide support for each other.




 +   8 people like this
Posted by Victor Bishop, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 4:38 pm

Victor Bishop is a registered user.

Steven- It was a confirmed re-infection with a different COVID19 strain. THE RESULTS ARE GOOD NEWS. The patient didn't get sick, his body produced an appropriate immune response to quickly beat the virus. What this does mean, however, is that herd immunity cannot be achieved naturally, only a vaccine will work.


 +   6 people like this
Posted by Steven Goldstein, a resident of Old Mountain View,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 5:59 pm

Steven Goldstein is a registered user.

Victor,

A DIFFERENT STRAIN? That is not good news because COVID 19 will mutate in a short period of time. There is no way to in fact claim that people will be permanently immune to it after recovery.

Yes he didn't get sick, BUT HE WAS A CARRIER. That is worse and you know it.

The WHO and the CDC are still not saying that past infection will protect you yet. The SCIENCE is not there yet. Simply put, there still is no HERD immunity. Yes if it is squelched so that no more infections occur, an R NOT of less than .5 for 3 months will clear the threat of infection as long as no one from another region infected does not go into the "SAFE" zone. THAT IS NOT HERD IMMUNITY.

Please be careful everyone, I want you all to be safe.


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Diana Diamond, a Palo Alto Online blogger,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 6:52 pm

Diana Diamond is a registered user.

Gentlemen --

Just a reminder -- this column is about boredom, not the coronavirus or politics. Please stay on the topic so others can respond.
Appreciatively, Diana


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Victor Bishop, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 6:55 pm

Victor Bishop is a registered user.

From Dr, Akiko Iwasaki : (Web Link)

“A first case of #COVID19 reinfection from HKU, with distinct virus genome sequences in 1st and 2nd infection (142 days apart). Kudos to the scientists for this study.

This is no cause for alarm - this is a textbook example of how immunity should work. “

You can go to her twitter account where she discusses it. She has illustrations there showing why this is good news

Web Link

I will trust her word ver the comments of an amateur


 +   4 people like this
Posted by Victor Bishop, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 6:57 pm

Victor Bishop is a registered user.

Diana- the column is about boredom caused by the coronavirus SIP


 +   5 people like this
Posted by Jennifer, a resident of another community,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 7:10 pm

Jennifer is a registered user.

I'm bored to death. It does feel like Groundhog Day. Everyday is the same, with no end in sight. If this doesn't end soon, it's tempting to stop playing by the rules. I totally understand why others aren't. Our mental well being is important too. Free Jennifer!


 +   2 people like this
Posted by Steven Goldstein, a resident of Old Mountain View,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 8:46 pm

Steven Goldstein is a registered user.

Victor,

Tweets are NOT peer reviewed scientific reports, your first link is only a page discussing the Doctor discussed from the Yale Medical School.

The second link is to a twitter post. It is not a Peer Reviewed Medical report.


Please be more careful? You are making claims with no evidence to support it. You are taking words completely out of context. Please provide some peer reviewed reports to support these conclusions?

I am scared that you and others are putting yourselves in greater danger than you should, that's all. I really want everyone to be safe.

With all care, respect, and appreciation to you and everyone else.


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Victor Bishop, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 8:55 pm

Victor Bishop is a registered user.

Steven

Peer reviewed and accepted by a medical journal

Web Link


“ ADIFFERENT STRAIN? That is not good news because COVID 19 will mutate in a short period of time. There is no way to in fact claim that people will be permanently immune to it after recovery. "

Isn't the above an example of making claims without evidence to support it.

As I said, I will go with knowledgeable scientist and not amateurs.

To respect Diana request this is the last comment I will make on this issue


 +   5 people like this
Posted by Alvin, a resident of Professorville,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 9:27 pm

Alvin is a registered user.

You may be bored because parents, usually the mom, has to stay home now all day with the schools being closed. Maybe that's why you're having fewer visitors, along with the scare-mongering and hysteria by the media and government guilt-shaming people to "stay home, save lives" or whatever the latest PR slogan.


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Steven Goldstein, a resident of Old Mountain View,
on Aug 25, 2020 at 10:56 pm

Steven Goldstein is a registered user.

Victor,

I will only present what you just referenced:

"Background:

Waning immunity occurs in patients who have recovered from COVID-19. However, it remains unclear whether true re-infection occurs.

Methods

Whole genome sequencing was performed directly on respiratory specimens collected during two episodes of COVID-19 in a patient. Comparative genome analysis was conducted to differentiate re-infection from persistent viral shedding. Laboratory results, including RT-PCR Ct values and serum SARS-CoV-2 IgG, were analyzed.

Results:

The second episode of asymptomatic infection occurred 142 days after the first symptomatic episode in an apparently immunocompetent patient. During the second episode, there was serological evidence of elevated C-reactive protein and SARS-CoV-2 IgG seroconversion. Viral genomes from first and second episodes belong to different clades/lineages. Compared to viral genomes in GISAID, the first virus genome has a stop codon at position 64 of orf8 leading to a truncation of 58 amino acids, and was phylogenetically closely related to strains collected in March/April 2020, while the second virus genome was closely related to strains collected in July/August 2020. ANOTHER 23 NUCLEOTIDE AND 13 AMINO ACID DIFFERENCES LOCATED IN 9 DIFFERENT PROTEINS, INCLUDING POSITIONS OF B AND T CELL EPITOPES, WERE FOUND BETWEEN VIRUSES FROM THE FIRST AND SECOND EPISODES.

Conclusions:

Epidemiological, clinical, serological and genomic analyses confirmed that the patient had re-infection instead of persistent viral shedding from first infection. OUR RESULTS SUGGEST SARS-COV-2 MAY CONTINUE TO CIRCULATE AMONG THE HUMAN POPULATIONS DESPITE HERD IMMUNITY DUE TO NATURAL INFECTION OR VACCINATION. FURTHER STUDIES OF PATIENTS WITH RE-INFECTION WILL SHED LIGHT ON PROTECTIVE CORRELATES IMPORTANT FOR VACCINE DESIGN.

This report in fact validates my point. The virus is mutating and becoming another infectious agent that is carried by a person showing no signs of infection. In fact the conclusion indicates that the mutations will require updated vaccines. This is really NOT GOOD NEWS at all. It only took maybe 6 months for the virus to mutate enough to prevent acquired immunity to prevent infection. Thus people become carriers to those that are NOT vaccinated for either the original or the mutated new versions.

Please be careful?


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Alvin, a resident of Professorville,
on Aug 26, 2020 at 4:54 am

Alvin is a registered user.

@Victor Bishop "Bars should not be opened"

[Portion removed.]

How about letting owners choose if they want to open up or not, including allowing indoor dining, or do you prefer tyranny? The same with masks, it should be an individual choice.


 +   6 people like this
Posted by Justin Case, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 26, 2020 at 8:38 am

Justin Case is a registered user.

Curious...does boredom also equate to sense of restlessness given today's Covid-19 related
restrictions & protocols?

If so, it appears that the younger generation is having a harder time adjusting to SIP mandates,
& safe distancing guidelines.

Countless reportages of large parties/gatherings & bar scenes frequented by millennial-aged participants seems to confirm this.

Older folks appear to be more concerned about their health & are less inclined to be clamoring for 'party central' social environments. Maturity & a personal sense of responsibility are probably key factors.

As far as boredom goes...only boring people tend to remain bored as they often lack a certain degree of imagination and/or creativity. In other words, find something stimulating to do...your choice.

And hanging out at a bar or keg party does not provide a long-term solution or alternative unless one is dependent on ethyl alcohol, small talk, & in dire need of superficial company.








 +   3 people like this
Posted by Jennifer, a resident of another community,
on Aug 26, 2020 at 8:54 am

Jennifer is a registered user.

I'm not bored because "I'm a mom." Our kids are grown. Most of my hobbies are outdoor hobbies that are on hold. Our vacations to Australia and Canada were cancelled. Not all older folks are "more concerned about their health." I'm middle aged, in excellent health and rarely catch a cold. A 93 year old lady at our church is attending outdoor services every Sunday, while people half her age are staying home. She's in excellent health too, and less fearful than younger people because she's not overweight and she doesn't have any underlying health problems. It's unhealthy people that are fearful, regardless of age.

I think boring people are less likely to be bored during Covid 19 because they're used to being bored, and lead boring lives. Those of us who don't lead boring lives are definetely more bored. It's not hard to understand.


 +   7 people like this
Posted by Justin Case, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 26, 2020 at 9:35 am

Justin Case is a registered user.

Being bored is a state of mind & can be overcome somewhat by seeking alternative outlets to pursue (excluding hanging out at a bar or a kegger bash).

All it takes is a little bit of imagination (which most boring people tend to lack).

To be clear...there is a difference between boring people & being bored.

Boring is a personality facet while being bored is a condition.

And both are subjective considerations at best.



 +   4 people like this
Posted by Jennifer, a resident of another community,
on Aug 26, 2020 at 10:30 am

Jennifer is a registered user.

If you're not bored being stuck in the house 24/7/365, you should be. Regardless of imagination or creativity, being stuck inside creates cabin fever, and it's mentally unhealthy. All the imagination and creativity in the world won't stop you from going nuts from being unable to live our lives. If you're not bored from lockdown, I question how much fun you were having prior to the lockdown. Life isn't inside the four walls of your home, including your tv and internet use. Some of us like being active, working at work, traveling in the summer and enjoying the company of friends and family.


 +   5 people like this
Posted by Justin Case, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 26, 2020 at 11:05 am

Justin Case is a registered user.

> "I question how much fun you were having prior to the lockdown."

^ A good question...albeit one that can only be answered from a personal (aka subjective) standpoint.

How do you define 'fun'? Since you are obviously a mature individual (i.e. mother of grown children, global traveler etc.), I would imagine that you probably have second thoughts regarding frivolous gatherings to 'burn off steam' as practiced by countless reckless, immature & self-serving millennials who are restless & 'bored' with a pressing need to socialize on a superficial level.

A suggestion...maybe go hop on a steamship (if so desired/inclined) to get out of the house & travel the world. Connect with others & add to your Instagram account.

Just don't bring that Covid-19 crap back where it can spread even further.




 +   3 people like this
Posted by Novelera, a resident of Midtown,
on Aug 27, 2020 at 12:07 pm

Novelera is a registered user.

Diana, I enjoyed your column. I am also bored. AND, I'm late to the commenting because I have had terrible problems with internet. My just-installed fiber connection has made a huge improvement in my life. For nearly two weeks everything either didn't work at all or was massively slow.

I am bored with food. Every day wondering what to cook. I live alone, so going to have dinner at the outdoor tables on California or University doesn't really appeal. I did have a very nice birthday dinner in July with a friend who came down from SF to treat me on the day.

And, yes, I have ordered takeout to help some Midtown restaurants. But food in a paper carton that needs to be microwaved to get it back to the right temperature just doesn't thrill me.

There was a lot of back and forth about whether SIP is an important method of keeping infection numbers low or whether it's an infringement on one's rights.

I am over 70, quite healthy, and don't worry that much about getting sick, but I believe that social distancing, absolutely wearing masks, and staying away from others as much as possible is the one way we can eventually end up closer to normal.


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Green Gables, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Aug 27, 2020 at 1:13 pm

Green Gables is a registered user.

This is tedious and boring. I'm still mad at the Chinese government and would like to punch them in the nose for not doing their diligence.

Anyone can help with gardening at Vallombrosa in Menlo Park. Their gardener had a heart attack and is unable to garden for the time being. Look on their website and e-mail Dave.


 +   3 people like this
Posted by Lee Forrest, a resident of Crescent Park,
on Aug 27, 2020 at 3:22 pm

Lee Forrest is a registered user.

> I'm still mad at the Chinese government...

^ Me too as this pandemic did not start in the United States.

But I'm not going to blame them for boredom...just the coronavirus.


 +   2 people like this
Posted by Green Gables, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on Aug 27, 2020 at 3:36 pm

Green Gables is a registered user.

Oh, yes, Lee, we all would not be wearing masks and staying home if it weren't for the virus stated in China.


 +   2 people like this
Posted by chris, a resident of University South,
on Aug 27, 2020 at 7:49 pm

chris is a registered user.

Unfortunately, we have too many people like Victor who refuse to follow rules and will keep the epidemic going in the US for a long time.

In China, they bit the bullet (the people had no choice but nevertheless) and went back to almost normal while Americans were arguing about masks.


 +   7 people like this
Posted by Victor Bishop, a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood,
on Aug 27, 2020 at 9:06 pm

Victor Bishop is a registered user.

Chris- [Portion removed.]

Just so you know- I have been following the rules since day 1- I have sheltered in place, I always wear a mask when I am out, I maintain a 6 foot distance between other people. I just think that after 5+ months, we need to seriously look at the very adverse effects from the focus on Covid only.

We should not blindly follow anyone, especially career bureaucrats.
Time to take sensible steps.


 +  Like this comment
Posted by chris, a resident of University South,
on Aug 28, 2020 at 4:30 pm

chris is a registered user.

Victor,

The Chinese did not spend 5 months inside. Americans spent very little time actually isolating. Many have been out and spreading the COVID since April.

[Portion removed.]


 +   5 people like this
Posted by Maya, a resident of Barron Park,
on Aug 28, 2020 at 4:54 pm

Maya is a registered user.

Interestingly I realized about 2 months ago that I was tired and bored because my own mindset was limited. I was in a bubble and wouldn't consider any different viewpoints. I was right of course, and frankly pretty smug about it too. That's when my grandson decided to tell me about his support for Trump - imagine! Trump the evil, inhuman monster! How COULD someone with my own blood entertain such a horrible thought! Trump is worse than Hitler!

But he's my grandson... he gently persisted... and I decided to listen. I mean, what else am I doing, right?

At first I listened because I was sure I could counter every point he made. To my surprise, he agreed that Trump is spiteful, oafish and lacking in grace (to say the least), but he also talked about various positive things Trump has done. Mind you, I then had to double-check those things... and sure enough, I found the media has been selectively manipulating and not telling us everything. How had I so completely forgotten the lessons of the 60's and 70's when media manipulation was also rampant? Why had I never questioned the talking heads that not too long ago lied us into a war in Iraq and brought slavery as an institution (in Libya) back to the world? Why am I suddenly now believing everything the CIA says? Well, once started, my bubble cracked open pretty well I can tell you!

Now, I still don't like Trump -- he's spiteful, oafish and lacking in grace (to say the least) -- but deciding not to swallow media lies anymore has been very liberating!

I haven't decided for Biden, and I'm not sure I can stomach coloring in the square for Trump -- but I don't suppose it matters because everyone else here will be voting for Biden/Harris ticket despite the many concerns on that ticket. I guess we really like one-party rule, haha! But the world definitely got a lot more interesting when my grandson persisted in helping me break through my smug, stubborn mindset.

I'm actually super interested now to research everything without only seeking support for being right. I get a kick out of finding all the media lies I never wanted to notice before. So empowering!

I also feel hopeful now rather than fearful and despairing -- fearful and despairing in Barron Park! How much more privileged can I be? I can afford the mental space to consider the concerns of "the other half" of Americans who vote differently than I usually do. It only broadens my world. And it's something I can *do.*

My hope and interest weren't squashed by the refusal of others to think like me -- I was the one squashing my hope and interest through narrow groupthink and rejecting the concerns of others. Hope and interest both sprung renewed when I decided to listen.

Now I figure... it takes a lot of energy to demonize and seek to suppress half the population. Exhausting! No wonder I was tired and bored! And Biden/Harris or Trump/Pence, neither pair is going to be able to heal us if we refuse to do most of the healing ourselves.

I really thank my grandson for waking me up.


 +   4 people like this
Posted by Anne, a resident of Midtown,
on Aug 29, 2020 at 1:43 pm

Anne is a registered user.

No, I'm not bored.

I'm grateful; that I'm healthy, I have enough to eat, I'm not on the front lines of the COVID epidemic, I haven't lost my home due to a fire, I have air conditioning and an air cleaner so I don't have to breathe smoky air, and a million other reasons. What a selfish headline. No wonder non-residents resent Palo Altans. Is this really the message the Diamond and the Weekly want to send right now?

Try to be creative and use the time to work on projects you wouldn't be able to fit in otherwise!


 +   1 person likes this
Posted by Steven Goldstein, a resident of Old Mountain View,
on Sep 2, 2020 at 2:07 am

Steven Goldstein is a registered user.

The thing we single people with no families are suffering the most from.

No physical human contact.

I am in need of a hug so bad, I can feel physical stress and am in extreme anxiety.

I know most people are not so "touchy feely" but after 5 months this is getting bad. I think even some anti-contact people must be feeling something like this.

I don't have any pets either.


Follow this blogger.
Sign up to be notified of new posts by this blogger.

Email:

SUBMIT

Post a comment

In order to encourage respectful and thoughtful discussion, commenting on stories is available to those who are registered users. If you are already a registered user and the commenting form is not below, you need to log in. If you are not registered, you can do so here.

Please make sure your comments are truthful, on-topic and do not disrespect another poster. Don't be snarky or belittling. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

See our announcement about requiring registration for commenting.

Sponsored

Wonders of the water: Meet the tide pool whisperer of the San Mateo coastline
Dive into the aquatic oddities, coastal creatures and other rapidly-disappearing denizens of the Peninsula shores.

 

Get important election coverage sent straight to your inbox daily.

Vons drops Korean fried chicken on downtown Redwood City
By Elena Kadvany | 1 comment | 21,976 views

Are our recycling bins too big?
By Sherry Listgarten | 10 comments | 2,288 views

I am Voting Yes on Measure RR to Provide Caltrain a Dedicated Revenue Source
By Steve Levy | 5 comments | 1,382 views

Premarital and Couples: See "Buck" for Couple's Tips
By Chandrama Anderson | 0 comments | 1,382 views

Nov. 3 -- a critical election that will determine our future
By Diana Diamond | 5 comments | 707 views

 

Who is your local hero?

Whether they're grocery shopping for a neighbor or volunteering for a nonprofit, you can spread the joy and support our journalism efforts by giving them a shout-out.

Learn More