http://paloaltoonline.com/square/print/index.php?i=3&d=1&t=3067


Town Square

'Not your grandma's grandma'

Original post made on Jan 17, 2008

The median age of grandparents has stayed constant over the past century -- 45 years old, according to Handbook on Grandparenthood, edited by M. E. Szinovacz.

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Comments

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Posted by Monet
a resident of another community
on Jan 17, 2008 at 12:30 pm

Hey, Ms Donne,
Congratulations and best wishes in GaGa Sisterhood.


Like this comment
Posted by Parent
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jan 17, 2008 at 5:59 pm

I had my last of four children when I was 43, my eldest being 9. He is now 9 and I am still far from being a grandparent. I am not alone in this area.

With fertility drugs and women delaying starting a family, the trend of being a grandparent at 45 is going to diminish drastically.


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Posted by Palo Alto Mom
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jan 20, 2008 at 2:21 am

I'm not quite sure what "the median age of grandparents has stayed constant over the past century -- 45 years old" is supposed to mean. Is it supposed to be "age at birth of first grandchild"? Is this a local or world-wide statistic?

I'd imagine this median age has something to do with differences in socio-economics, cultural behaviors, and such, because most people *I* know locally have delayed / are delaying marriage into their 30's. Even if they have children immediately, they won't be grandparents at 45.

I am about to turn 45, but I have a child in high school and a child in middle school (so there had better not be grandchildren in my NEAR future. :p) I am a physically fit practicing martial artist, my 72-year-old mom still walks several miles and swims daily, and even my 97-year-old grandmom still lives on her own without assistance, though she is less active since her hip replacement.

I do take issue with the article's quotation "Baby boomers have continued to try and ignore the fact that we're getting old." I know I'm not 20-some anymore, and I know not to request 20-some physical behavior levels from my older body, because I shall rue any resulting injuries, which take longer to heal now. However, 45 is still far from "old". I may have a few grey hairs here and there, but I don't even have any wrinkles yet. :)