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Town Square

Air pollutants linked to higher risk of birth defects

Original post made on Mar 28, 2013

Breathing traffic pollution in early pregnancy is linked to a higher risk for certain serious birth defects, according to new research from the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Thursday, March 28, 2013, 9:53 AM

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Posted by Susan Goldsborough
a resident of Stanford
on Mar 28, 2013 at 11:03 am

Residential wood smoke is another major source of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. Just like cigarette smoke, there is no safe level of exposure; if you can smell it you are being exposed. For more information, go to Web Link


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Posted by scary
a resident of Downtown North
on Mar 28, 2013 at 11:56 am

I suppose this is one reason that global warming is beneficial. I smell wood smoke in the air around my neighborhood on every single cold day, but not so much on warmer winter days.

I really feel sorry for the kids living near those oil refineries in the East Bay. They breath the pollution every day and have no way to escape it.


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Posted by What about....
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Mar 28, 2013 at 1:36 pm

Think about all those people who bought property near major streets in Palo Alto, in order to find an affordable home and get their kids into good schools. There is a lot of pollution along Alma, Oregon Expwy, Middlefield, and El Camino, and for two blocks on either side of those streets. CalTrain smog probably doesn't help.


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Posted by Statman
a resident of Menlo Park
on Mar 30, 2013 at 9:06 am

Let's remember that correlation does not necessarily imply causation. Of course it's not ethical to do a randomized study in this situation, but that would be a more convincing way to investigate this.


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Posted by Earlier study
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Mar 31, 2013 at 8:50 pm

There was an earlier study about two years ago that had a similar conclusion. It
stated that pregnant women living within 300 yards of a high traffic street had a much higher incidence of birth defects in their babies

That means about two blocks on either side of Middlefield, Embarcadero, Oregon Expwy, or Alma.