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Town Square

Patriots of America

Original post made by Citizen on Aug 29, 2007

Patriots Of America
In Palo Alto, I think all of our country's citizens should say the Pledge of Allegiance, the same for those who go to school. Every morning, I've noticed that some how, not many classes in our Palo Alto School District say the Pledge of Allegiance every day! The Districts of Palo Alto spend most of their time on Field Trips and outdoor recess and plays and assemblies then studying and practicing hand writing or spelling or reading and learning.
While my Parents were driving me through my neighborhood in Palo Alto, I noticed fewer American Flags tagged up to person's houses then I do in different parts of the United States. For the persons who did so… Thanks! I think that it's respectful for us not to honor the young men and women who've gone before us in serving our country.
I wrote down some information for those of you who don't know what our country's flag stands for

What the flag represents:
It represents justice and liberty for all Americans.
To the military, it represents a strong responsibility to protect the people of this land, and to be willing to lay down their lives to serve their country.
For foreigners, the flag represents freedom to practice their religion, freedom to practice an education and to get ahead in life. It also means liberty and justice.
For so many people living all over the world, it represents a dream of hope that they hold onto in their country, while awaiting to immigrate.
The flag also represents freedom to express oneself; to vote, to protest, and to voice one's political opinions.
The flag represents the 13 colonies, and the 50 states of the United States of America, and all of its citizens who have immigrated from all over the world.
It represents democracy!
Surely, from this rather short list, each American can relate and connect, in a positive way, to the American flag.
Personally, the flag represents people's right to vote. It also reminds me of part of my family who served in the country. Is also represents the people who served in WWII.
I hope that Americans aren't connecting the flag to inappropriate things, because the flag does not represent such things, it represents you, me, and every American citizen in this country.
THIS COUNRY ROCKS!

Comments

Posted by Grumpy, a resident of South of Midtown
on Aug 29, 2007 at 11:15 pm

Just a couple of comments:

What is a counry?

I have no objection to saying the pledge of allegiance to the flag daily. I do object to the "under God" part, which was added to the pledge when I was 15 to appease the McCarthyites. Please explain to me whose God. A Methodist God? A Presbyterian God? An Islamic God? A Judaic G_d? You get my drift....or should.

By the way, I'm a veteran. U. S. Army. Are you?

If you haven't served the country, please keep your opinions to yourself.




Posted by Grumpy, a resident of South of Midtown
on Aug 29, 2007 at 11:16 pm

Just a couple of comments:

What is a counry?

I have no objection to saying the pledge of allegiance to the flag daily. I do object to the "under God" part, which was added to the pledge when I was 15 to appease the McCarthyites. Please explain to me whose God. A Methodist God? A Presbyterian God? An Islamic God? A Judaic G_d? You get my drift....or should.

By the way, I'm a veteran. U. S. Army. Are you? If you haven't served the country, please keep your opinions to yourself.


Posted by Anna, a resident of Southgate
on Aug 29, 2007 at 11:29 pm

I don't know which army Grumpy served in, but to suggest that only people who have armed forces experience be permitted to experess public opinions is.....no other word for it..... "unAmerican".

Maybe in the few military dictatorships still left in the world, do Grumpy's attitudes hold sway, but not here.


Posted by Walter_E_Wallis, a resident of Midtown
on Aug 30, 2007 at 6:57 am

Since we know the students are inculated with what the country owes them, a bit of reciprocity would be nice.


Posted by Nathan, a resident of Southgate
on Aug 30, 2007 at 8:04 am

Let's look at the pledge:

"I Pledge Allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

It's a nice little homily as pledges go, but why do we even bother? Other countries don't require this nonsense from school age children. It reminds me of the motivational pledges that they shout in the Japanese auo factories every morning.

Here's a quote from a website (URL follows):
"I Pledge allegiance to whomever might be President of the United States at this time, and to the Republic (i.e., the United States) for which he or she was elected by what may or may not have been a majority to be in charge of, one nation under Canada, extremely divisible, with liberty within the bounds of legally acceptable behavior and justice for some."

Here's the website Web Link

- it's iconoclastic, and a relief from those who think that reciting some pointless words make good citizens.


Posted by GMC, a resident of Fairmeadow
on Aug 30, 2007 at 9:50 am

Grumpy, thank you for your service to our country. You earned our respect by serving, but not the exclusive right to freely express yourself.


Posted by Walter_E_Wallis, a resident of Midtown
on Aug 30, 2007 at 10:31 am

Nathan, do you ever tell your wife you love her? Or do you enumerate the limitations placed on that love. Citizenship is a mutual obligation that must be learned, else some folk like the Walkers and Amses see nothing wrong with aligning with nations and idiologies that wish us harm. In cowboy movies we often were told "You can't take the law into your own hands." In reality, we can't allow the law out of our hands, and that requires an understanding that it is our law.