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Town Square

Letters

Original post made on Dec 21, 2007

Table tennis in town

Read the full story here Web Link posted Wednesday, December 19, 2007, 12:00 AM

Comments

Posted by Dave Dockter, City of Palo Alto, a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Dec 21, 2007 at 5:15 pm

To Annabelle who wrote a wonderfel 'thank you' to the city tree stewards of yesteryear for this 2007 fall color wonderland--well said! For the horticultural record, this has been the most outstanding fall color season of 15 seasons straight in the San Francisco Bay Area! A truly Chamber of Commerce year.

I know your thanks were generally to those persons responsible, which are several. But yes, there is probably the ONE who did more to affect this city and many other communities with fall color trees. It was none other than long term city of Palo Alto parks employee George Hood, who took over reigns from his father. Together with Sunset, his legacy inspired city arborists Gary Namman, Dave Sandage and now Eric Krebs, and adjoining cities, to try new and diverse species (yes--love 'm' or hate 'm').

It is a facinating story to how his 1950's curiosity of and for fall color germinated, then took hold with key persons and literally changed the face of municipalities in the state of california, where fall color was reletively non-existant as a street tree amenity. The details of this would be best told in a real Weekly story, however.

But, your vocal appreciation for this years show of color is 'spot on' and great to hear, and I suspect will prompt more residents and city tree stewards to keep planting the 'best of the best', to live with a wonderful diverse urban forest of sunlight, color, shade and benefits. Thanks Annabelle.


Posted by Jim, a resident of South of Midtown
on Dec 21, 2007 at 6:36 pm

Dave,

Yes, the colors are nice, even if not indigenous to the area. However I like oaks and redwoods. Can we please try to save these native trees, by taking them OFF the protectd list? Nobody will plant them anymore. What rational property owner would?