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Town Square

Bridge Collapse In Minn.

Original post made by Sad on Aug 1, 2007

Our family extends it's thoughts and prayers to those in Minn. that were in the bridge collapse today. We are with you today.

Comments

Posted by marques, a resident of Professorville
on Aug 2, 2007 at 8:09 am

Prayers are nothing but witchcraft and just as useless. It's nice that you feel for the victims and their families, but you would be much more helpful to them if you send financial assistance rather than useless prayers. It's amazing that in this day and age people are still so irrational and hung up on mambo-jumbo.


Posted by Theresa, a resident of Addison School
on Aug 2, 2007 at 12:13 pm

Not a very helpful comment, Marques.

Financial and other assistance suggestions, according to the Minneapolis Star-Tribune:

HOW YOU CAN HELP
AMERICAN RED CROSS

Go to www.redcrosstc.org to sign up to get trained to volunteer.

While the disaster did not create a blood shortage, those who want to donate blood for future needs can make an appointment to give blood by calling 1-800-GIVE LIFE (448-3543) or by visiting www.givebloodgivelife.org

SALVATION ARMY

Monetary donations earmarked "Disaster Relief" may be sent to The Salvation Army at 2445 Prior Ave., Roseville, MN 55113 or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY. To donate online, go to www.salarmy.org


Posted by Pray - er, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Aug 2, 2007 at 1:38 pm

Marques

I do not wish to argue with someone about prayer being mumbojumbo, but in a situation like this when those of us who are onlookers to a tragedy, where we can do very little apart from giving financially or unable to do more than donate blood as a more practical act, then prayer does help. You may be right in that it doesn't necessarily help the victims in a concrete manner, but it does help those who are onlooking and if that was the only reason for prayer, it is worth it for that alone. Many people are able to pray for others as a tangible manner of giving aid. Those who pray are then often moved to do more as a result. What may start out as a short prayer, continues into acts of kindness and before you know it, a whole movement of aid can follow. So, please keep your opinions to yourself. Maybe you can do something to ease your conscience on this rather than scoffing at others'.


Posted by marques, a resident of Professorville
on Aug 2, 2007 at 4:32 pm

Religion is the Opiate of the masses: It is a highly addictive drug, but governments everywhere encourage its use. Many of the politicians who neglected fixing the bridge that collapsed and instead used tax payers money to build a nearby baseball stadium were in the habit of praying a lot. Unlike those who waste their time praying, I made many phone calls, just like I did after Katrina, to find out how best to help the victims. Quit praying and start helping, and we'll have a much better world.


Posted by Walter_E_Wallis, a resident of Midtown
on Aug 2, 2007 at 7:57 pm

The praying are often the helping.
For those incapable of accomodating a supreme being, try considering religions as matrixes within which to entwine proven beneficial behavior patterns.