Town Square

Post a New Topic

This is the election you wouldn't want to win

Original post made by tj, Old Palo Alto, on Sep 26, 2008

The Poisoned Chalice

London TimesWeb Link


The bad news: November's victor could be a one-term disaster.
The good news: a great president may follow him

Whoever wins on November 4 will be ascending to the job at one of the most difficult times for an American chief executive in at least half a century.
When the votes are counted his people might ruefully conclude that the victor is not Barack Obama or John McCain.
The real winner will be Hillary Clinton, or Mitt Romney, or Mike Huckabee, or some now happily anonymous figure whose star will rise in the next four turbulent years.

2008 may be the best year there has been to lose an election....

Desperate times like these actually produce both types of president, sequentially:
a one-term disaster who paves the way for a true giant.


Comments (17)

 +   Like this comment
Posted by Peter
a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 26, 2008 at 2:53 pm



That is a very interesting article from the Times.
It helps explain why Bill Clinton is campaigning for McCain.

Hillary will be a powerhouse in the Senate for 4 yrs and then a shoe in for POTUS,
she will be much stronger fighting a republican administration.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by OhlonePar
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 26, 2008 at 10:01 pm

Our greatest presidents assumed office in trying times. There's a clean-up job here, but it's clear you can't blame the problem on the incoming president.

Is it possible to be better off than we are four years from now? Yes.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by pam
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Sep 26, 2008 at 11:26 pm

"Is it possible to be better off than we are four years from now? Yes."

how?


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Greg K
a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 26, 2008 at 11:42 pm

This is nonsense. The great Presidents are the ones that succeed in difficult times. FDR brought our country through the Great Depression and World War 2. Only an idiot hopes that the next President will screw up worse than George Bush so that their real choice will have a change in 2012.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by OhlonePar
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 27, 2008 at 12:32 am

Pam,

In four years, it's possible that we'll be at peace and not at war. It's possible that our financial markets will have been stabilized. We'll have reestablished some of our standing globally. The Dept. of Justice may have regained some of its freedom from political agendas. We'll be on an upswing from a recession and housing prices will have begun to recover.

There are lots of ways, simply because we're not in good shape now. Quite unlike Bush inheriting a country at peace with a surplus and a solid economy.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Greg K
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 27, 2008 at 7:45 am

Our economy is in shambles. Energy prices are soaring, as is the national debt. We are spending billions of dollars and thousands of lives searching for non-existent WMDs. Terrorist forces are strengthening because we have neglected the war in Afghanistan. America has lost its reputation as the world's moral and economic super-power.

I think it is hard to imagine the USA being a worse place 4 years from now.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Sharon
a resident of Midtown
on Sep 27, 2008 at 4:23 pm


Economists say bailout plan is flawed and isn't needed

"It's more hype than real risk," said James K. Galbraith, a University of Texas economist and son of the late economic historian John Kenneth Galbraith.
"A nasty recession is possible, but the bailout will not cure that. So it's mainly relevant to the financial industry."
Another doubter of the Great Depression theme is Kenneth Rogoff, a Harvard University economics professor, who thinks the intervention may prevent or delay the necessary failure of weak financial institutions.Web Link
"It is time to take stock of the crisis and recognize that the financial industry is undergoing fundamental shifts


 +   Like this comment
Posted by pam
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Sep 27, 2008 at 4:33 pm

op, greg, our economy will continue to falter to years; this is not something we fix with a bandaid; it's different this time. energy prices will continue to soar, as will the national debt. we will continue to spend billions of dollars and thousands of lives in the middle east. terrorist forces will continue to strengthen, even as we migrate the war to afghanistanpakistan. america has lost its reputation as the world's moral and economic super-power; it will take a lot longer than four years, or even 10 years, to get that back.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by OhlonePar
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 28, 2008 at 1:35 am

Pam,

One of the fastest ways to start rebuilding our reputation in the Middle East is to elect Barack Obama. He's of the party of Clinton, who's still popular overseas and he has made it clear he'll reach out to rebuild alliances.

The economy, if trust is restored, can turn around. I think it will be years before real-estate comes back, but that's ultimately a good thing, in my view.

I don't expect a boom in four years, but I can definitely see us on an upswing from this nadir.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by pam
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Sep 28, 2008 at 10:59 am

"I don't expect a boom in four years, but I can definitely see us on an upswing from this nadir"

op, you read international affairs like most americans, from the perspective of the 'saving ange'l that everyone admires. you need to get out and travel a bit to realize that the rest of the world doesn't care about america any more. they want to _be_ america...that's as far as it goes...we have seen nothing yet in terms of economic displacement...the current 'fix' will last only as long as the next opportunity by our competitors to hurt us.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by pam
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Sep 28, 2008 at 11:03 am

there will be a new president in 2012...we're on at least a 2 decade ride through hell...sooner or later americans will wake up to the fact that _they_ have to change...the party's over...


 +   Like this comment
Posted by OhlonePar
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 28, 2008 at 2:13 pm

Pam,

I've lived overseas and have visited 30 different countries. So, I get out.

And we're far too large an economic power for other countries not to care about us. Basically, if we tank, a lot of countries go right with us. Such are the glories of the global economy.

You need to get out more.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Sue
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Sep 28, 2008 at 4:22 pm



I have lived and worked abroad, glad to be back.

I have no desire to give more power and money to the UN nor establish a EU like welfare geriatric state.

The EU is frantically trying to back pedal on their disaster of multiculturalism. We thrive through E Pluribus Unum
The fact is that USA is the center of western Christian Civilization, we have nothing to learn about government or culture from the rest of the world. We just need cheap commodities and science educated immigrants.

Obama and his wife feel ashamed of the USA, that view is shared by a tiny fraction on the left coasts.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by OhlonePar
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 28, 2008 at 4:53 pm

So Sue, none of the 6 billion people on the rest of the planet have nothing to teach us. Never mind that E Pluribus Unum is Latin not a native American language, that we took our common law from the English, our notions about innate human rights from Rousseau and other French philosophes, that Jazz, our native form of music, owes its rhythms to Africa and its notation to the Austrians . . .

I could go on, but, honestly, what a goofy thing to say as an American when the genius of Americans is to absorb both the people and ideas of other cultures.

I'm a mutt and proud of it.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by pam
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Sep 28, 2008 at 6:04 pm

"And we're far too large an economic power for other countries not to care about us. "

they care about us only insofar as their is mutual advantage. as the balance of that advantage migrates, they care less. that's what's beginning to happen. it appears that your travels have been as a tourist, and not as seeker...


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Alex
a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 28, 2008 at 7:07 pm



Antoin "Tony" Rezko, a convicted influence peddler who was once one of Gov. Rod Blagojevich's and Obama's most trusted confidants, has met with federal prosecutors and is considering cooperating in the corruption probe of the governor's administration, sources told the Tribune.Web Link


 +   Like this comment
Posted by but seriously
a resident of College Terrace
on Sep 29, 2008 at 6:42 am

Your point? The actual article says there is STILL no link with Obama, just with the governor.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Email:


Post a comment

Posting an item on Town Square is simple and requires no registration. Just complete this form and hit "submit" and your topic will appear online. Please be respectful and truthful in your postings so Town Square will continue to be a thoughtful gathering place for sharing community information and opinion. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

We prefer that you use your real name, but you may use any "member" name you wish.

Name: *

Select your neighborhood or school community: * Not sure?

Comment: *

Verification code: *
Enter the verification code exactly as shown, using capital and lowercase letters, in the multi-colored box.

*Required Fields

I Told My Mom She's Dying
By Chandrama Anderson | 13 comments | 2,559 views

Grab a Bowl of Heaven soon in Mountain View
By Elena Kadvany | 0 comments | 1,949 views

Quick Check List for UC Applications
By John Raftrey and Lori McCormick | 0 comments | 1,307 views

Campaign Endorsements: Behind the Curtain
By Douglas Moran | 3 comments | 814 views

Mothers, daughters, books, and boxes
By Sally Torbey | 2 comments | 317 views