Town Square

Post a New Topic

Stanford reaps $6.2B in 'transformative' campaign

Original post made on Feb 9, 2012

Stanford University announced Wednesday it raised $6.2 billion in a five-year fundraising campaign that ended in October.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Thursday, February 9, 2012, 9:24 AM

Comments (8)

 +   Like this comment
Posted by Hey-Stanford--How-About-Helping-Your-Neighbors-A-Little?
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 9, 2012 at 12:34 pm

Maybe it's time for Stanford to share some of that money by helping to build some grade separations here in Palo Alto, and possibly pay for the hardware to install adaptive signal controllers in Palo Alto, and those sections of Menlo Park that need them.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by svatoid
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Feb 9, 2012 at 12:37 pm

Hey-Stanford--How-About-Helping-Your-Neighbors-A-Little?--I think you will find that the people who donated had the expectation that the money would be used for Stanford and not repair PA crumbling infrastructure.
However if there will be any money used for Palo Alto--it will be for College Terrace, to alleviate their decades of suffering due to Stanford.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Hey-Stanford--How-About-Helping-Your-Neighbors-A-Little?
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 9, 2012 at 1:43 pm

> I think you will find that the people who donated had
> the expectation that the money would be used for Stanford

Maybe .. but what about Stanford's asking them? Stanford could open a fund for mitigating local impacts. It's big on fighting world-wide "environmental problems", so what not admit that its operation here in Palo Alto and Menlo Park has created certain local "environmental problems". It's not hard to enumerate quite a list of issues, from water draining to San Francisco Creek that helped to create the Flood of '98, to traffic, to driving up the price of housing. There are a lot of wealthy people living in the local area that might see the rationale of giving the money to Stanford, which in turn used it to fund some of the mitigation projects that no doubt could be identified where Stanford is a significant contributor to the problems.

What makes you think that giving away money to help people thousands of miles away is more desirable than helping people who live in the shadow of Stanford?


 +   Like this comment
Posted by svatoid
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Feb 9, 2012 at 1:51 pm

"Stanford could open a fund for mitigating local impacts. "
No they should not. Palo Alto has a budget--the fact that it cannot manage it's money well is not Stanford's problem. Plus Stanford has done plenty for Palo Alto.
Some people think that Stanford is a cash cow to be milked whenever Palo Alto needs money.
If you are so eager to get money why not approach these wealthy people living in the area and ask them for money to mitigate Palo Alto's suffering.

" where Stanford is a significant contributor to the problems."
which problems are you referring to?? Traffic??? the non-existent issue that Kishimoto and others have harped about for years????? driving up the price of housing???? How many people are sorry that there houses are worth millions??? Think it was all Stanford? Why not hit up Apple for some money as well.
Get real--Stanford should not have to pay for Palo Alto's financial incompetence.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Hey-Stanford--How-About-Helping-Your-Neighbors-A-Little?
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 9, 2012 at 2:05 pm

> No they should not

The comment, as written, was "could" .. which implies an action with a future time component. (Stanford grad, you?)

> driving up the price of housing????

Stanford has contributed to this. With homes already over 1M and doubling every decade or so--it's only a matter of time that very few people will be able to move into Palo Alto. This will force the price of housing to come down, which is probably a good thing, given the grand scheme of things.

> Why not hit up Apple for some money as well.

Apple doesn't have a campus with 25K people on it. However, there is probably be a time that some sort of impact fee that will be allocated throughout the county.

Stanford does not pay property taxes. So, it does not directly contribute to the costs of maintaining the infrastructure that it needs for its operations. Perhaps it would be better to just terminate its exemption of $4+B dollars. That exemption is costing Santa Clara Count/Palo Alto some $400M dollars a year.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Hey-Stanford--How-About-Helping-Your-Neighbors-A-Little?
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 9, 2012 at 2:06 pm

> some $400M dollars a year.

Sorry, make that $40M a year.


 +   Like this comment
Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Feb 9, 2012 at 10:56 pm

What?! I thought Stanford did directly pay for its infrastructure. What part of their $456M capital budget don't I understand? And their operations go through another $4B annually. Palo Alto's capital budget looks like $70M, and operating budget $146M (though I find the documentation somewhat confusing).

I suspect the City could solicit and raise tax-deductible contributions for anything necessary or useful we might want to do if we could trust the money would be spent wisely. For something like library construction people will only lend money, not give it away. I know PAUSD raises millions in outright donations each year to supplement the school budgets. Obviously people see value worth supporting there, on top of the taxes already paid. And Stanford's donors see something worth supporting, with enough faith and trust to make most of those donations "unrestricted". There really is plenty of money around, but the people who have it got that way by learning not to throw it down a rat hole. (E.g. Warren Buffett wishing he could pay more taxes, but decidedly not donating anything to the US government.)


 +   Like this comment
Posted by Hey-Stanford--How-About-Helping-Your-Neighbors-A-Little?
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Feb 12, 2012 at 9:11 am

> What part of their $456M capital budget don't I understand?

Perhaps the term "infrastructure" is used a little too loosely here. There is city infrastructure, country infrastructure, state infrastructure and Stanford infrastructure. Stanford pays for its own infrastructure (often with the help of US taxpayers), but the school does not operate in a bubble. It dumps water into San Francisquito Creek during heavy rains..water that works its way into Palo Alto and East Palo Alto. Sometimes, the water contributed by Stanford overbanks the Creek, and ends up in Palto Alto streets and homes.

All of the vehicular traffic that Stanford generates moves through the public roadways (hereafter referred to as "infrastructure"). Any sewerage that is generated and not totally processed, and disposed of, on the Stanford lands--no doubt works its way into Palo Alto and Menlo Park sewerage systems--public infrastructure.

Hopefully, this will clarify the use of the term "infrastructure".


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Email:


Post a comment

Posting an item on Town Square is simple and requires no registration. Just complete this form and hit "submit" and your topic will appear online. Please be respectful and truthful in your postings so Town Square will continue to be a thoughtful gathering place for sharing community information and opinion. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

We prefer that you use your real name, but you may use any "member" name you wish.

Name: *

Select your neighborhood or school community: * Not sure?

Comment: *

Verification code: *
Enter the verification code exactly as shown, using capital and lowercase letters, in the multi-colored box.

*Required Fields

Opening alert: Zola, in downtown Palo Alto
By Elena Kadvany | 1 comment | 3,495 views

Middle Class Scholarship for incomes up to $150,000!
By John Raftrey and Lori McCormick | 5 comments | 2,405 views

Men Are Good For Three Things
By Laura Stec | 21 comments | 2,349 views

Two creative lights depart Palo Alto, leaving diverse legacies
By Jay Thorwaldson | 2 comments | 1,352 views

Reducing Council Size? Against
By Douglas Moran | 11 comments | 1,020 views