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Palo Alto / Menlo Park property tax survey (4 questions)

Original post made by Chris Zaharias on Jan 12, 2012

If you live in Palo Alto or Menlo Park, please take this 4-question survey I put together on property taxes. I'm trying to understand why we acquiesce to uncapped property taxes in a land of $1.5-$5M homes:

Web Link

[Takes 45-60 seconds to complete]

Comments (5)

Posted by Foster, a resident of Fairmeadow
on Jan 12, 2012 at 10:43 am

Agriculture yield??????? Did I read that wrong?

*** repeal the commercial side of prop 13 ***

Prior to prop 13, revenues were 60% from commercial, 40% from residential.

It has completely flipped - 40% from commercial, 60% from residential.


Posted by Chris Zaharias, a resident of Crescent Park
on Jan 12, 2012 at 10:48 am

Yes, Foster, that *was* tongue-in-cheek. I listed that because during the agrarian period in which property tax laws in this country were created, property taxes scaled linearly with the value of the property, which in turn was a function of # of acres.


Posted by Foster, a resident of Fairmeadow
on Jan 12, 2012 at 10:57 am

Yeah, well, some in the audience never get the joke....

/sigh

Perhaps much the way some don't understand prop 13 wasn't created to keep Grandma in her house, but in fact to to allow Howard Jarvis's apartment owners association members and other commercial landowners to shift the burden onto residential homeowners, especially via the numerous loopholes available to commercial owners via prop 13.

Apparently, I can't *tell* a joke either....

;-)


Posted by Bob, a resident of Community Center
on Jan 14, 2012 at 9:56 am

Ignore this bogus survey. And by the way, see #4. NO RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY is exempt by Prop 13. READ IT. Everyone's residential taxes can only go up 2% a year.


Posted by Jen K, a resident of Menlo Park
on Jan 14, 2012 at 10:28 am

this is insane!!!

"Prior to prop 13, revenues were 60% from commercial, 40% from residential.

It has completely flipped - 40% from commercial, 60% from residential."

If we got businesses to pay their fair share, wouldn't that fill all the shortfalls that cities, counties and the state are experiencing in this great recession?

Cities and counties could be fully staffed, rebuild infrastructure, etc.. All the resulting jobs would generate revenue for the state, maybe bring it slowly back to previous levels.

The schools, maybe we could finally fund the schools and get them back to what they used to be!


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