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Residents split on impacts of hospitals expansion

Original post made on Jul 13, 2010

Residents were divided Monday night on the environmental impacts of the Stanford Medical Center Facilities Renewal and Replacement project during the City Council meeting. More than 20 Palo Altans stepped up to the podium to praise and criticize the hefty Draft Environmental Impact Report's assessments of the huge project.


Read the full story here Web Link posted Tuesday, July 13, 2010, 9:57 AM

Comments (48)

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Posted by La Barbe
a resident of Downtown North
on Jul 13, 2010 at 10:59 am

Ahhh. Here we go again. The infamous "PALO ALTO PROCESS". Does anyone care how bad our reputation is? Ask any developer or contractor. Amazing how much Palo Alto shows it's small-town character, while at the same time it's a world famous destination and center of so much. Somebody ought to write a book.


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Posted by Jo Ann
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jul 13, 2010 at 11:14 am

If construction is going to be that much of a problem, think what traffic will be like after it's done.

Embarcadero, El Camino, Middlefield etc. are already backed up for several blocks in each direction. Maybe we can go for 10-mile gridlock.


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Posted by svatoid
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Jul 13, 2010 at 11:33 am

"If construction is going to be that much of a problem, think what traffic will be like after it's done."
Yes, this is the typical Palo Alto doom and gloom scenario about traffic. Remember how people were saying how bad traffic would be after the Sand Hill Road project? Remember how people were saying how bad traffic would be in Palo Alto after Ikea opened?

"Embarcadero, El Camino, Middlefield etc. are already backed up for several blocks in each direction. Maybe we can go for 10-mile gridlock."
Where are they backed up? When are they backed up?
Palo Alto wants visitors, they want industry, they want companies, they want shoppers. With all that comes traffic. Learn to live with it. Sorry this constant whining about "too much traffic" has gotten really old.


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Posted by Kate
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jul 13, 2010 at 12:45 pm

To "Svatoid'
You are criticizing those who worry about the back up and the traffic, but YOU live in Charlston Gardens about as far away from the predicted gridlock possible tucked away safely in a remote neighborhood from the activity. Traffic in Palo Alto on University, MIddlefield, Sand Hill,Embarcadero, and El Camino are rush hour bumper-to-bumper nightmares. Embarcadero - with three lanes at Paly is a nightmare now. I wonder how the ambulances are going to get through to the ER. But yes, the hospital must be built. Maybe there is no solution. I am concerned about traffic's physical effects of pollution on asthmatics, COPD, and other breathing problems. The soccer fields at El Camino and Page Mill are the worst places to play any sports now.



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Posted by neighbor
a resident of Greenmeadow
on Jul 13, 2010 at 12:49 pm

Traffic? Are you serious? Try being on Alma between 830am-930am or between 5:15 and 6pm. It' backed up forever. Been on University avenue lately? You must be dreaming if you think this won't impact traffic.


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Posted by svatoid
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Jul 13, 2010 at 12:56 pm

KAte--maybe you should travel on San Antonio Road sometime and you will see backups as well.
But I just grin and bare it. We want Skype, Stanford Shopping Center, Facebook, Fry's, Apple Store etc in town, then we need to put up with traffic. But at the times cited, that is rush hour--there is a reason for that
Nighbor--what is backed up forever--all the way to el Camino on one side and San Jose airport at the other end?
I have found that people in Palo Alto love to exaggerate the traffic woes, so that they can stop progress.
As I said we seem to want all the benefits that come from companies/institutions in Palo Alto, but no one wants to be inconvenienced at all--so what if you spend an extra 15-20 minutes in traffic. Get over it.


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Posted by stanford supporter, but
a resident of Downtown North
on Jul 13, 2010 at 1:20 pm

The hospital should be allowed to expand, however, Palo Alto residents should be given some advantage in exchange for the burdens Palo Altans will have to bear. When the present hospital was built the City was able to get some guarantees that local community physicians and patients would have priority access to the hospital. Although, not involving a hospital, MV insisted on a similar proviso in allowing a non-profit to have use of city owned property a few years ago.
How about making sure the hospital does benefit Palo Alto (and maybe Menlo Park)residents by requiring some prioritization of access to the hospital?


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Posted by Polly Wanacracker
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 13, 2010 at 2:23 pm

"I just grin and bare it."

That could explain a few traffic snarls.


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Posted by jb
a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Jul 13, 2010 at 3:03 pm

Tee-hee, good observation, Polly!


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Posted by Smart move!!
a resident of Community Center
on Jul 13, 2010 at 3:08 pm

Having read all your complaining about traffic, if I were making the decision about building the new Stanford Hospital, I'd build it anywhere else but not in Palo Alto. How about on the salt ponds in Redwood City, along with the 1200 condos for hospital employees. Now, that's an idea!!! Let Redwood City get the Millions of Dollars in mitigations.


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Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jul 13, 2010 at 3:22 pm

If Stanford were smart they would start negotiating for the creation of a redevelopment area adjacent to their new redwood City Outpatient facility which would accommodate a brand new hospital. They could abandon the existing facility in Palo Alto and then would have years of already approved growth by reusing that space under the current approved master plan.

Palo Alto doesn't deserve a new hospital or the jobs or visitors it brings. Palo Alto actually doesn't deserve Stanford University but that is another issue.


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Posted by Me Too
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 13, 2010 at 3:54 pm

My wife and I, both of whom commute within PA during rush hour, wonder what traffic people are talking about as well. At 8:45, I wait maybe one light cycle at Alma and Churchhill - during the summer, there is no wait. Coming home, usually on El Camino, there are no more than minor delays at 5:30 or 6:00pm.

I will grant you that on Embarcadero and probably University, there are lines of cars coming and going to Stanford. But I figure those people are almost all from out of town, headed to/from 101 - they choose their commute, it isn't imposed on them.

And outside the narrow rush hour - no traffic tie-ups to speak of.

I'm not sure what people expect or think is the case elsewhere, but I find the traffic here as good as one could hope for given the density and employment opportunities in town.


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Posted by Traffic in Palo Alto is BAD?
a resident of University South
on Jul 13, 2010 at 4:25 pm


If Palo Altans think that traffic here is bad, you obviously don't get around much. I commute in these *snarled* areas regularly, and I don't think we have a problem at all. Waiting for a few light changes is nothing. As usual, people whine about how bad they have it here. You don't know how lucky you are. And again, Palo Alto would be nothing without the University and the Medical Center. If you really don't like the traffic, ride a bike!


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Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 13, 2010 at 5:07 pm

Discussing traffic in Palo Alto, I find that the traffic is always much lighter when school is out. There is so much traffic caused by parents driving their kids to school. More shuttles would help, we need to charge the passengers and get more routes.

I will say that I did drive Arastradero this morning expecting to find light traffic since there was no school at Gunn, but traffic was gridlocked around Gunn going westbound.


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Posted by No traffic problems
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 13, 2010 at 6:01 pm

Yes, whining about non- existent traffic problems is one of thesjor pastimes here in palo alto. It got one woman elected twice to the council-- however most people eventually saw through her charade and she had more than 70% of the people vote against her for higher office. Bottom line- the only traffic problems are those made up by the NIMBYists in order to keep the palo alto process working. Sad how selfish some people are.


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Posted by Me Too
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 13, 2010 at 7:59 pm

When I biked by Gunn this morning, there there was some kind of underground utility work going on shutting the right turn lane, which I am sure did back things up quite a bit.


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Posted by Easy Driving
a resident of Meadow Park
on Jul 13, 2010 at 8:19 pm

These spoiled people complaining about traffic should go live in Manhattan, San Francisco or Central London before they banned private cars. I commuted daily between South PA and Atherton for five years in the so-called rush hour.

I used Middlefield or Alma or El Camino Real, none had me waiting at any light for longer than one change except Middlefield and Embarcadero when Walter Hayes let out and they turned the four way stop light on.

That 4 way stop light is a choice Palo Alto has made to keep school children safe. It has nothing to do with over capacity of vehicles although it causes backups.


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Posted by Unworthy, Unwashed, and Undeserving
a resident of Community Center
on Jul 13, 2010 at 10:16 pm

"Palo Alto doesn't deserve a new hospital or the jobs or visitors it brings." - Peter Carpenter, a resident of Atherton

I'll concede your point, sir, if you will work hard and sincerely to have this little gem located in Atherton. Not Redwood City mind you, Atherton.


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Posted by Unwashed
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 14, 2010 at 8:27 am

Dear Unworthy,

Yes, Mr. Carpenter of Atherton is certainly opinionated about Palo Alto.

Unwashed


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Posted by Alphonso
a resident of Los Altos Hills
on Jul 14, 2010 at 9:38 am

Why is this story so different than the one reported in The Mercury? - it was the same meeting. Too much Spin and not enough honest reporting.


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Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jul 14, 2010 at 10:44 am

Unworthy states:"Yes, Mr. Carpenter of Atherton is certainly opinionated about Palo Alto."

Well Mr Carpenter has a factual basis for his opinion on this matter having served as both a Palo Alto Planning Commissioner and as the Executive Director of the Stanford University Medical Center. Based on sitting on both sides of the table I am convinced that Palo Alto has little appreciation for how much its very existence and quality of life derives from and depends upon Stanford University. And I believe that Palo Alto has needlessly and at great cost delayed the essential upgrading of the Stanford Hospital.

In my opinion Stanford would do well to follow the example of UCSF and simply move its medical facilities away from a community which does not give it the fullest possible support.


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Posted by Kate
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jul 14, 2010 at 11:21 am

One of the biggest traffic bottlenecks in Palo Alto is a direct route to Stanford Hospital, campus, and shopping center. It is the intersection of University Avenue and Middlefield Road. There is NO left turn lane arrow light for eastbound
OR westbound traffic from University on to MIddlefeld. So usually at heavy and even moderate traffic times ,only one auto at a time can get through that intersection on to Middlefield - and traffic backs up for blocks on University. That intersection is the first one that Palo Alto could fix right now.


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Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 14, 2010 at 11:54 am

Kate

With all due respect, I don't think University is or should be the best direct route to Stanford. The signs on 101 and wise drivers use Embarcadero and I think that route should be the designated route and improved accordingly.

Saying that, of course the improvements to the University/Middlefield intersection could be improved, as the Alma/Sand Hill intersection - but of course that is another discussion.


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Posted by Polly Wannacracker
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 14, 2010 at 1:25 pm

"Mr Carpenter has a factual basis for his opinion on this matter having served as both a Palo Alto Planning Commissioner and as the Executive Director of the Stanford University Medical Center."

So, you did your damage to Palo Alto and ran to hide in Atherton. That's not very nice of you, Mr. Carpenter. Neither is your calling us names for wanting to control what happens to our city.

I think Unworthy et al. have the right idea. Why don't you tell us why you don't want this project in Atherton? You're a NIMBY just like us, aren't you? Then let's be a big happy family.


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Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jul 14, 2010 at 1:34 pm

Polly Parrot states:"That's not very nice of you, Mr. Carpenter. Neither is your calling us names for wanting to control what happens to our city."

No names called - are you feeling uncomfortable for some reason?

You should want to control what happens in your city but just remember what happens when you kill the goose that lays the golden eggs.

I think the new hospital should be built where there is land available and it is wanted - Palo Alto meets only the first condition and that is thanks to Stanford's much longer term planning than the planning of the City of Palo Alto.


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Posted by Polly Wanacracker
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 14, 2010 at 3:31 pm

"I think the new hospital should be built where there is land available and it is wanted"

Why, Atherton has tons of land. There's lots of space between houses there. You only need to tear down a few of them (you'd never miss them) and you'd have a huge campus for the new hospital.

But let's be honest. You don't want this new hospital in Atherton, do you?


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Posted by good luck with that
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 14, 2010 at 6:21 pm

"The signs on 101 and wise drivers use Embarcadero and I think that route should be the designated route and improved accordingly."

Resident-good luck with that. Remember the leader of the anti-Stanford movement, whose famous battle cry was "too much traffic" happens to live on Embarcadero Road. This is the person who wanted to change Embarcadero to one lane in each direction with traffic circles and who was worried when Stanford remodled their football stadium that on 5 saturdays a year there would be more traffic on "her" street. So you can be sure that any attempts to turn what is a major local artery into the street it should be will be met with vocal and prolonged opposition.


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Posted by pat
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 14, 2010 at 10:02 pm

>"Amazing how much Palo Alto shows it's small-town character, while at the same time it's a world famous destination and center of so much."

The only reason Palo Alto is a destination (not sure I'd call it world famous) is because of Stanford. Without Stanford, it's just another small town on the peninsula.


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Posted by Paul
a resident of Downtown North
on Jul 14, 2010 at 10:34 pm

"Without Stanford, it's just another small town on the peninsula."

So what's wrong with that? None of the other small towns on the peninsula seem to mind being just small towns on the peninsula. Menlo Park loves it, in fact, and Atherton fiercely defends its status as such.

If Stanford wants to pick up its marbles and move to, say, Modesto, well fine. Disclaimer: Modesto may have a different opinion - I haven't asked.


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Posted by Resident
a resident of another community
on Jul 15, 2010 at 11:46 am

Here are some inconvenient facts: we are running out of water, non-polluting energy, sewage treatment space, garbage space, classroom space, road space and open lands. Palo Alto has already acquired the huge Campus for Jewish Life in South Palo Alto.

Palo Alto residents are going to be asked to pay for increased infrastructure due to the overbuilding and they will get in return crowded schools, crowded streets, crowded parklands, higher water and energy bills and rationed water. They will lose local fresh produce, because the water will be diverted to the Bay Area's overbuilt cities. What about cleaner air, protection of the Bay and the Baylands and protection of our parks?

Will the City Council follow the former auditor's recommendations in order to use the revenue per person responsibly? No, they will continue to allow overbuilding after hours of debate rather than tend to the real needs of the city.

The hospital needs to be upgraded, it does not have to increase in size. The size increase should be elsewhere where there is not such negative impact on one city (Palo Alto).


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Posted by Response to Paul
a resident of University South
on Jul 15, 2010 at 12:31 pm


"If Stanford wants to pick up its marbles and move to, say, Modesto, well fine. Disclaimer: Modesto may have a different opinion - I haven't asked."

You have no idea how Palo Alto would be impacted by such a move - how naive!


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Posted by svatoid
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Jul 15, 2010 at 1:03 pm

"The hospital needs to be upgraded, it does not have to increase in size."
Clearly you are unaware the direction that health care is going with regard to patient care and housing

"The size increase should be elsewhere where there is not such negative impact on one city (Palo Alto)."
This statement is full of unsupported claims--why do you assume that the impact of the new hospital will be negative (I know that is the standard Palo alto line--Stanford is evil, their new building will destroy our current wonderful way of life and of course the most infamous claim, the plaintive whine--"TOO MUCH TRAFFIC")
Why do you think only Palo Alto will be impacted (another typical PA response--the world revolves around PA and what we want is most important)


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Posted by Charlie
a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 15, 2010 at 1:20 pm


Having a teaching hospital on the same campus as the school of engineering, biology department, etc. is a great advantage for improvements in medical care. So building the new hospital in the same site is an important part of the plan. Having spent three weeks at the hospital with an ill family member, I can tell you that it is an invaluable resource to Palo Alto and the larger community.


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Posted by jim
a resident of Community Center
on Jul 15, 2010 at 4:18 pm

I'd like to add.
1. Use your bike more. We ARE the traffic problem.
2. Property values in PA are increased by Stanford
3. Stanford offers incredible value to all of us and the hospital is worldclass
4. As one person said. We heard the same talk about Sandhill and Ikea

I went to UC Berkeley but love Stanford and have gotten tremendous value from their resources. So at the very least I don't see why people like to bash Stanford.

City Planners and Stanford will agree on a plan and we'll be happy to get an even better hospital with a usable emergency room.


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Posted by Jo Ann
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jul 15, 2010 at 4:41 pm

Everyone who denies we're having traffic problems:

You're invited to come and sit in traffic on Embarcadero any old time time you'd like. Also feel free to sit through a few lights while waiting to turn from El Camino onto Embarcadero.

It's so green and sustainable breathing all those fumes.

You might also do some reading on communities like Palo Alto and Princeton located in the same towns as universities that have so much tax-exempt land and the impact on their communities. Business Week this week just had an article on Princeton, where the university pays no more taxes but the residents do and are still having to cut back critical services like police, road repairs, etc. to make up for the universities' not paying their fair share.


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Posted by svatoid
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Jul 16, 2010 at 6:02 am

"You're invited to come and sit in traffic on Embarcadero any old time time you'd like. Also feel free to sit through a few lights while waiting to turn from El Camino onto Embarcadero."

During certain times of day, it is expected that traffic will be heavy on EMbarcadero, since it is a main city artery.
As for turn lights on Embarcadero--I see they are timed to allow a large number of cars to go through.
It is clear to me that the above post is another in a long line of posts that try to exploit the myth that there is "too much traffic".

"are still having to cut back critical services like police, road repairs, etc. to make up for the universities' not paying their fair share."
Here is another myth--that Stanford is not paying their "fair share". How much land does Stanford lease to the city for a penny a year? How much money does Stanford inject into PA coffers from visitors etc?
PA has to cut back on services because the incompetent council and city manager have been fiscally irresponsible.


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Posted by pat
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 16, 2010 at 9:57 am

svatoid is right! Why expect Stanford to pay for stuff the city has neglected? Why ask Stanford to pay for a police station?

Stanford has already offered the city $125 million in fees and community benefits in exchange for permission to build.

Read Stanford's Guide to Key Community Issues at Web Link


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Posted by Richard Placone
a resident of Barron Park
on Jul 16, 2010 at 10:49 am

Re the traffic: I've lived in this town for 48 years, and do a fair amount of traveling around town. The only time I've ever experienced the traffic horror stories, (greatly exaggerated IMHO) is when I go out between 4 and 6PM. So I just avoid that time and let the commuters depart. My wife, who goes to so many lunches it's become a family joke and then volunteers at the hospital and Lytton Gardens, is out and about even more than me at all times of the day shopping and whatever,and she says she has never experienced these nightmares some residents complain about. So what gives?

Here is what Stanford and the medical center mean to this town, as I've stated to the council in a longer version of this letter. Wake up Palo alto residents, or move to Mendocino where you hardly ever experience traffic (or much else for that matter)

Council Should Support Stanford's Growth Plans

I applaud Council's care in weighing the impact Stanford's plans on the city's finances,
infrastructure and physical and social environment. But equal weight must be given to the
impact of the city's decisions on Stanford and the long term viability of Palo Alto.

Without Stanford, our city would be just be another small town. We would enjoy the same
climate, the same unique landscape, and the same cultural offerings of San Francisco. But we
would be indistinguishable from any other Bay Area city.

Consider what Stanford has meant, and will continue to mean, to Palo Alto and the entire peninsula:

EDUCATION: Without the influence and proximity of Stanford, the PAUSD would be just
another school district, rather than one of the highest-ranked in the country. This alone has
contributed to the high property values residents current enjoy.

AMENITIES: Stanford offers our community a superb museum, the Rodin sculpture garden,
theater and concerts in several venues, lovely grounds generally open to the public for
recreation and contemplation, access to educational programs for continued learning, the world
famous Stanford Research Park, the upscale Stanford Shopping Center, and much more. In
fact, Council's recent "Destination Palo Alto" PR project relied largely on Stanford's attractions
for tourists and business travelers.

Stanford has provided many community benefits: the gift of playing fields at El Camino Real
and Page Mill Road; reconstruction of Sand Hill Road, resulting in better traffic flow between
Highway 280 to El Camino Real; improvements to El Camino along the Stanford Shopping
Center frontage; the lease—at minimal cost—of the park across from the shopping center;
below-market leases to the city for utility department facilities.

REVENUE: Most of these amenities bring much-needed tax dollars to the city from shoppers,
business travelers, students and visiting faculty. Special activities at Stanford, like the Senior
Games and major sporting events, bring more visitor revenue to Palo Alto.

The creativity of Stanford professors and students led to the birth of Silicon Valley plus the
growth of leading companies from Varian to Tesla in the Stanford Research Park.

WORLD-CLASS MEDICAL CENTER: Finally, we benefit from the proximity of the Stanford
Medical Center, which has a direct relationship to the overall quality of medical care in our
community. The Palo Alto Medical Foundation is as it is today largely because of the
interaction between medical school faculty and the clinic's own medical staff.

I'm sure I'm not alone when I say that Stanford's medical facilities have been a godsend to
me and my family. My wife has experienced life saving surgery and ongoing care as a result of
advanced technologies offered by Stanford physicians. My late mother, who died last year at
97, enjoyed good quality of life as well as longevity because quick access to Stanford Hospital
saved her life more than once.

This is quite a bill of positive particulars for one institution to bring to a community!

Considering Stanford's global mission and responsibilities, it has bent over backwards to be
a good neighbor.

Re-building and expanding Stanford Hospital and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital—at a
projected cost of $3.5 billion—will make Stanford one of the country's premier medical centers.
The hospitals must upgrade to meet state-mandated seismic safety laws. Expansion will
enable them to keep up with advances in technology and demand for services. It will also draw
medical and healthcare businesses to the area.

Some residents fear more traffic, but traffic in the city is increasing even without Stanford's
growth. Economic development—a key city initiative—and ABAG's decree for high-density
housing will bring more residents and more traffic. But without economic growth, the city will
surely decline.

While some opponents criticize the medical center's height, the buildings will be located deep
within Stanford property, barely visible to nearby downtown or residential areas.

Stanford has already offered the city $125 million in fees and community benefits in exchange
for permission to build. Additional financial contributions from fees generated by the project,
more workers and more visitors to the city can only be good news to depleted city coffers and
to local businesses feeling the recession's pinch.

I urge residents to read Stanford's Guide to Key Community Issues at
Web Link There readers will learn of
the incredible job Stanford is doing to alleviate traffic problems, reduce its use of energy and water,
and operate on a more sustainable basis.

I urge the city council to respond to Stanford's proposals in a positive collaborative manner,
seeking balance between protecting the city's legitimate concerns and expecting Stanford to
solve all our financial and structural problems.

I know of no other enterprise that has contributed as much to the city's revenues and vitality
as the university and medical center. Palo Alto without Stanford would not be the Palo Alto we
know and love today.








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Posted by svatoid
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Jul 16, 2010 at 11:19 am

Well put, Mr Placone. A refreshing and truthful counterpoint to Jack Morton's vicious booklet, attacking Stanford, that he sent out last year and to Kishimoto's groundless anti-Stanford whining.


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Posted by Polly Wanacracker
a resident of Professorville
on Jul 16, 2010 at 12:22 pm

Mr. Placone, svatoid, and others have a point: you won't see any traffic problems if you just stay home.


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Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 16, 2010 at 3:07 pm

One of the causes of Bay Area air pollution and high asthma rates is the increase of traffic over the years. I've lived in Palo Alto 60 years (yes, before the Bay was filled in), and don't believe all growth is good here. The Bay Area can't support an unlimited number of people, buildings, cars, concrete. Stanford needs to upgrade its hospital facilities and needs to find another location for the increase in hospital size. I suggest an area where it can pay staff enough money so staff are able to live a reasonable distance from the new hospital.


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Posted by pat
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 16, 2010 at 8:11 pm

HP has announced it will move 3,000 employees from Cupertino to Palo Alto over the next 2 years.

What will the city demand from HP for all that additional traffic?


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Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jul 16, 2010 at 8:20 pm

Pat asks:"What will the city demand from HP for all that additional traffic?"

Absolutely nothing, which proves that Palo Alto is simply bent to kill the goose which has laid the golden eggs - i.e. Stanford.


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Posted by Ralph Wolf
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 17, 2010 at 1:15 pm

As a Palo Alto homeowner and a 7 year cancer survivor who was treated at my 'local hospital' I'm extremely grateful to have the hospital in my back yard.

We all know it's only a matter of time before another big earthquake hits. We need a hospital that is up to modern seismic standards.

So I'm all for the renovation and expansion.

If you think traffic in Palo Alto is bad, you should have seen how crowded the outpatient infusion center was before they built the new cancer center!

Traffic doesn't bother me. Any day without tubes in my arm is a good day.

Knock $10k off the resale value of my house? Eh, whatever... Google probably raised it $10k. On average, I'm doing alright. In any case, it still keep the rain off my bed.

So build the hospital already! It will save lives. More than a few will be from Palo Alto.


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Posted by neighbor
a resident of another community
on Jul 17, 2010 at 3:08 pm

Sometimes the whining from the "anti-Stanford-whatever-the-subject" folks really sounds like a Saturday Nite Live skit. Funny, not-so-funny, and predictable all at the same time. (The attacks on Peter Carpenter are bizarre).

Perhaps these folks need to get a Real Estate Appraiser to tell them how much Stanford's presence has inflated their home's value. Better yet, let's trade houses. I'll be happy to tolerate having Stanford Hospital nearby -- in fact, with my health issues, I'd be happy to be as close as possible, but Palo Alto's absurd real estate prices prevent that.

The answer is not for Stanford to move (they cannot/will not since the "Stanford Medical Center" = both the Hospitals and the Medical School)....but for you to move because you are so miserable in Palo Alto.

Growth is inevitable. Reasoned Planning to guide growth is critical. , not the silly whining. But Planners don't last very long in Palo Alto.


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Posted by I've Got Mine
a resident of another community
on Jul 18, 2010 at 7:14 am

There's plenty of NIMBYism to go around. Palo Alto has it in spades, but so does Peter Carpenter's so-called "rural" Atherton. And what about Menlo Park? That town's motto truly should be "Don't change a Damn Thing!"


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Posted by Peter Carpenter
a resident of Atherton
on Jul 18, 2010 at 10:42 am

Don't ever expect me to defend Atherton's apathy and its narrow vision from living behind high fences.


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Posted by Paul
a resident of Downtown North
on Jul 18, 2010 at 9:30 pm

"Don't ever expect me to defend Atherton's apathy and its narrow vision from living behind high fences."

But you do enjoy the result of "Atherton's apathy and its narrow vision," right? Else why not live in Palo Alto, near your private aviation airport and (coming soon) your dream medical complex?


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