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Poll: Americans Want Debate to Go On

Original post made by Posted Without Comment on Sep 24, 2008

Just after Sen. John McCain's announcement this afternoon that he was suspending his campaign and seeking to postpone Friday's schedule presidential debate, SurveyUSA interviewed 1,000 adults nationwide.

Key findings: "A majority of Americans say the debate should be held. Just 10% say the debate should be postponed. A sizable percentage of Americans, 36%, think the focus of the debate should be modified to focus more on the economy. 3 of 4 Americans say the presidential campaign should continue. Just 14% say the presidential campaign should be suspended. If Friday's debate does not take place 46% of Americans say that would be bad for America."

Web Link

Comments (56)

Posted by Greg K, a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 24, 2008 at 11:13 pm

Of course, the American tax payers want to know exactly how their $700 billion is being spent. George Bush is saying almost nothing, but he is a lame duck and won't be able to clean up his mess anyway. Fixing the economy is going to be the main job of the next President and we want to hear their ideas right now. The election is just a few weeks away.


Posted by Chuck, a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Sep 25, 2008 at 1:23 am

Why does a Wall Street need the US taxpayer to solve their greed problem?

It is greed that has created the mother of all Margin Calls.

In the words of Nancy Reagan just say No!


Posted by Eric, a resident of Monroe Park
on Sep 25, 2008 at 2:00 am

Obama's comment on McCain's proposed no show on Friday because of the fiscal crisis: "The President should be able to handle more than one crisis at a time" (or words to that effect). I agree.


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 2:29 am

McCain's behavior is just odd. He hasn't been involved in the bail-out and doesn't sit on any of the relevant committees. There's really no way that this isn't an attempt at political grandstanding and, yet, it makes him look weak--unwilling to step up to the plate and debate the issues.

He doesn't seem like someone who really wants to be president--or thinks things through.


Posted by mary, a resident of Gunn High School
on Sep 25, 2008 at 8:56 am



Bill Clinton just came out in support of McCains action, and Paulson pleaded for McCain to save bailout.
So much for a "stunt."

John McCain got involved in the bailout negotiations after Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson told Sen. Lindsey Graham yesterday that the bailout plan would fail unless McCain came in and brought balky Republicans aboard.
That's what Bob Schieffer reported on this morning's Early Show. Schieffer's account stands in stark contrast with the allegation by Dems like Barney Frank and their MSM cohorts that McCain's moves of yesterday were nothing more than a political "stunt."

Here was Schieffer speaking with the Early Show'Web Link


Posted by Good News, Bad News, a resident of Meadow Park
on Sep 25, 2008 at 9:08 am

Good news - McCain is a decisive man of action

Bad news - McCain has questionable judgment, a flair for drama, and doesn't listen to advisers

Result - Dramatic action of questionable benefit (and sometimes harm), forcefully executed, and plenty of backpedaling when reality sets in


He's not a bad guy and I like him, but it is hard to swallow as President. I saw Palin last night on TV - I suppose not much worse than Dan Quayle but still pretty scary.


Posted by Elect McCain????, a resident of another community
on Sep 25, 2008 at 9:20 am

I think the Boston Globe summed it up rather well in it's editorial:

Web Link

and especially in th elast paragraph:

"McCain has already brought discredit upon his campaign by shielding running mate Sarah Palin from hostile questions. This impulsive new stunt makes him appear unsteady and underprepared, too. America can work through a financial crisis and handle a campaign at the same time."


Posted by Beek, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 25, 2008 at 9:57 am

Well, McCain got a bounce when he named Palin, but that has disappeared and his campaign is sinking fast. This most recent stunt is sad, and it adds to the perception that he would be a disaster as a leader. Once we got to know Palin, it was scary to imagine her running the country. Now it is scary to imagine McCain running things.

That's a shame, because the country really needs to have a serious discussion about our future--the economy, taxes, the war, keeping safe from terrorists--and McCain shows no sign of engaging.

I worry that Republicans are going to feel cheated when McCain loses (because he imploded so badly and never became a serious candidate) and that this will lead to more bitter divisiveness at a time when we need strong consensus. I hope Obama finds a way to reach out and bridge differences.

For the same reason, I hope Obama does not win by a landslide.


Posted by Paul, a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 25, 2008 at 10:08 am

If McCain can't handle a debate about the biggest job in his life while he is one of 535 people working on just one of the type of problems a president must deal with simultaneously, he is egregiously unfit to be president.


Posted by Paul, a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 25, 2008 at 10:12 am

Sorry, my math may be off. McCain could be only one of 534 people deciding the bailout, if Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska) has to stand down due to his recent indictment for being part of the Republican Culture of Corruption.

But I don't think that math adjustment excuses McCain from the debate.


Posted by james, a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 25, 2008 at 10:17 am



I think it is very significant that Bill Clinton has come out so strongly in support of McCain leadership and decisiveness in this matter.

This will profoundly influence the independent voters and regan democrats to go with McCain.

Clinton sounded so sincere, remarkable, he has been supporting McCain for over a week now, but todays statements are amazing


Posted by Elect McCain????, a resident of another community
on Sep 25, 2008 at 10:32 am

Seems that no one has dared post a link to what Clinton said.
Here is one:

Web Link

Not sure that Clinton has come out "strongly in support of McCain leadership and decisiveness in this matter"--but you know how republicnas love to spin things (expecially when the campaign for their chosen pair is imploding).

Can you imagine the response, from republicans, if Obama has said what McCain did regarding the debate--Obama would have been vilified, called a coward, a shirker etc. Interesting how the double standard operates


Posted by Paul, a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 25, 2008 at 10:38 am

Associating Bill Clinton with McCain is a masterful tactic, aimed right at the Clinton-hating Republican base. It's a golden albatross if I ever saw one. Did James Carville dream it up?


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 11:26 am

I wouldn't call Clinton's comments a ringing endorsement of McCain's behavior--he says the debates should be cancelled only if both candidates agree to it. He also says that they ought to spend part of the first debate discussing the economy--something that plays to Obama, not McCain's strengths.

Gotta love it when Republicans start clinging to the words of Bill Clinton.


Posted by chris, a resident of University South
on Sep 25, 2008 at 11:34 am

Friday's debate is on foreign policy; is the debate is pre-empted by the debate on the bailout and the economy, what happens to the debate on foreign policy?

I think we need some answers before we can say whether holding the debate as scheduled is a good thing.


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 11:37 am

Chris,

No reason not to swap times and topics in that case. Do the economy first and the foreign policy second.


Posted by Left of Boom, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Sep 25, 2008 at 11:38 am

Left of Boom is a registered user.

McCain's campaign has asked to replace the Vice Presidential Candidates debate on Thursday with the first Obama-McCain debate on Foreign Policy.
Why postpone the Vice Presidential debates which are more than a week away? Especially when there is only one Vice Presidential debate?
And the bailout negotiators have said they effectively have a deal.

Web Link


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 12:10 pm

Left,

I've been wondering about that quest to cancel the VP debate. Given Biden's talents for gaffes and Palin's draw among her base, you'd think the McCain camp would want the debate. I just keep thinking that Palin just ain't cutting it enough so that they'll let her off her leash.


Posted by Paul, a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 25, 2008 at 12:14 pm

"Why postpone the Vice Presidential debates which are more than a week away?"

Aha, the plot thickens. This ploy has nothing to do with the bailout. McCain realized Palin's not ready to debate and won't be ready before the election. He's trying to defer and defer and eventually avoid the embarrassment of a faceoff with Biden, who actually has experience.


Posted by tj, a resident of Palo Alto Orchards
on Sep 25, 2008 at 12:23 pm



The proposal is to shift the schedule in an orderly manner, IE shift the presidential debate to next Thursday the reschedule the VP.

This makes it easier for the debate organizers/ press ETC.

The presidential debates are what are important, the VPs can be moved


Posted by Left of Boom, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Sep 25, 2008 at 2:11 pm

Left of Boom is a registered user.

Now that there a bailout deal, what's the point in postponing the debates? McCain's campaign lauds his experience in foreign policy and he just dashed to D.C. to negotiate the bailout, so he must be fully versed in its details. Beside he was Chairman of the Senate Commerce committee for years, so he already knows all about the economy.

In 30 hours of prep, McCain shouldn't have any problem with questions in a Friday at 9pm debate.


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 2:21 pm

Left,

It seems to me that if McCain bails on the debate at this point it will look as if it's because he's got cold feet--even more than it already does.

No matter what, he looks rash.


Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 25, 2008 at 3:09 pm




Bill Clinton: McCain acted on 'good faith' in debate delay...Web Link


Posted by Elect McCain????, a resident of another community
on Sep 25, 2008 at 3:18 pm

Hard to believe how desperate the republicans have become that they are quoting Bill Clinton now to justify McCain's actions--a number of years ago didn't they considered Clinton unfit to be in the White House and impeached him.
Well if Clinton was unfit, then certainly his judgments with regard to McCain carry no weight whatsoever. But I guess when your candidates are imploding......


Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 25, 2008 at 3:26 pm



Republicans forgive, the Christians among them believe we are all sinners.
Besides Clinton seems to have seen the error of his ways in committing perjury.
Also he knows the leadership qualities needed in a President and sees them in McCain.

He also said he will not campaign for Obama until after the Jewish holidays ( technically the last of these is October 22 )

Breaking news

Chris Dodd says it will take to the weekend to reach a deal on Bail Out.


Posted by Peter, a resident of another community
on Sep 25, 2008 at 3:39 pm

Turns out McCain hasn't really suspended his campaign. Campaign offices are still open and phone banking, he brought a campaign aide to the White House meeting (while Obama brought a Senate aide), and he has been giving TV interviews. Read this: Web Link


Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 25, 2008 at 3:51 pm



For most of today, I've thought that the debate would go on as scheduled in Mississippi tomorrow night.

Now, I'm not so sure.

I think Obama made a small but important concession when he decided to stay in Washington overnight instead of returning to Florida for more debate prep.
By doing that, he seems to have admitted that he needs to be here to be a part of the deal-making at the Capitol.
Once he has done that, what will be his reason for taking off to Mississippi tomorrow, if there is no breakthrough, or at least near-breakthrough, by then?
McCain has quite successfully pulled Obama into this, so that Obama might now face as much risk leaving critical negotiations to go to the debate as McCain faces by skipping it.


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 4:33 pm

Now there's a SurveyUSA poll out that shows 74 percent of the public wants the debates and the campaigns to continue.

One suggestion is that by making the debates so important, McCain is angling to bring more attention to them. Then if he does well, he'll get a bigger boost than he would have otherwise.

McCain doesn't seem to be that kind of tactician, however. And if he blows it, it could strike the final blow to his campaign.

Personally, I don't think he's going to ace the debates--not on rhetorical points--he simply doesn't have Obama's presence and energy. I remember when you could see Clinton take the election from Bush I in the town hall debate. Bush gave some reasonable, but non-answer to a woman about healthcare. Clinton got in there and spoke directly to the woman about what she was going through. It was a classic Clinton feel-your-pain moment.

I think Obama's just more likely to have that breakthrough moment of connection than McCain will.

Sharon,

The Senate won't be doing business at 9 p.m. on a Friday night. The candidates can fly down to Mississippi and fly back. As Obama's pointed out.


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 4:49 pm

Whoa, this is interesting:

Web Link

McCain's pushing for deregulation??? Hope some more solid reporting on this comes out.


Posted by tj, a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Sep 25, 2008 at 4:53 pm



No Kidding?

From Brian Williams' interview with John McCain:

WILLIAMS: If you were a betting man, would you bet that we'll see you in Oxford, Mississippi tomorrow night?

McCAIN: Well, I am a betting man.

Republican senators noted how fast the attitude of Senate Democrats changed when they heard McCain was headed to Washington—they immediately were more concerned with getting Senate Republicans on board.

The McCain campaign put out a short statement that reads: "We're optimistic that Sen. McCain will bring House Republicans on board without driving other parties away, resulting in a successful deal for the American taxpayer."

McCain was apparently a very active participant in the White House discussion, while Obama expressed his support for the general frame of the draft put together by the House and Senate Banking Committees but did not go beyond that.

The Democrats did not expect to be presented with additional ideas beyond that draft, and left the meeting decidedly unhappy.


McCain is acting like J P Morgan in a previous financial crisis, Morgan locked the leading bankers of his time in his library until they came up with and committed to a shared solution to the crisis.

In this case McCain will keep the doors locked till there is a solution to the crisis, debate be damned, solving the crisis is more important, that is what strong leaders do.

McCain was a fighter pilot, so was I, he is an expert on the OODA loop, look it up if you are interested, you will understand what is going on.


Posted by narnia, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 25, 2008 at 5:03 pm

A president needs to walk and chew gum because it is certain that during any president's term several crises may occur at the same time. The ability to juggle demands without falling apart is a requirement for any presidency that is minimally competent. So is delegating. Neither candidate's presence is necessary for success in this case. But making oneself look busy is surely a good thing for a candidate.
Why would the few hours taken for debate and traveling be so crucial for the development of the proposal?
I eagerly wait the debate.


Posted by Peter, a resident of Barron Park
on Sep 25, 2008 at 5:13 pm

"The ability to juggle demands without falling apart is a requirement for any presidency that is minimally competent. So is delegating."


Following that logic McCain should delegate his place in the debate to Palin, while he continues to deal with the security threats to this country from the financial crisis.

McCain is being Presidential, he does not have to audition for the job, he is doing it.

McCain previously requested multiple debates and joint town hall meeting with Obama, Obama declined, if he starts whining now he has lost credibility even for 2012, which he was aiming for in the first place, he was shocked when he won the nomination IMHO


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 5:18 pm

Actually Peter, McCain does have to audition for the job. That's why three-quarters of us think he should show up at the debates as scheduled.

He's not president, though I realize everybody kind of wants to forget about the guy who is.

The negotiations don't enter into this except that McCain agreed to this schedule earlier and is now reneging on it.

I don't think Obama was shocked he won--there's been a ton of work and planning involved in his ground operations.


Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 25, 2008 at 5:45 pm



Now on Gibson ABC, Obama agrees with McCain that the financial crisis is the highest priority and debates, while important, come second.

good for him


Posted by narnia, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 25, 2008 at 7:29 pm

Peter,
that's what congressional delegations are for- to be delegated. My,

there are even Speakers for both parties.


Posted by Carole Hoffman, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 25, 2008 at 7:44 pm

The intelligence of the (USA) electorate cannot be underestimated.


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 26, 2008 at 12:32 am

So apparently McCain showed up, said very little except to put forth a plan by conservatives that had already been dismissed as unworkable.

Just slowed down and politicized the process.




Posted by Dizzy from the flipflopping, a resident of Adobe-Meadows
on Sep 26, 2008 at 8:56 am

And now he says he (definitely maybe) will take part in the debate.



Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 26, 2008 at 9:25 am



One thing that has died, though its demise has not been widely reported yet, are all the grand Hope and Change plans of Barack Obama.
Nationalized health care, a youth corps, Carbon taxes, the mandatory tithe to the UN that he wants.
Reparations. Free health care for illegal aliens and drivers licenses for everybody.
All of that is gone. Finito. Over. Out.
It will be a job just to keep social security going.
This crisis should be the death knell of the RINOs and the big spenders.
If the Democrats win in 2008 it'll be like a dog that's caught a truck. What do they do then?
Or maybe the argument is that because government sponsored "affordable mortgages" helped cause the problem, then more government can fix it?
The 'Agreement in Principle' proposed by the Senate Democrats included earmarks for ACORN,
National Council of La Raza and
potentially the National Urban League.
Even supposing these illustrious organizations deserved it, where would the money come from?

No matter how the media gilds the lily, the core ideology of ever-more government intervention and largesse is really pushing up daisies.
Spin, meet reality.


Posted by Paul, a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 26, 2008 at 10:14 am

Here is the biggest crisis in decades, and McCain only politicizes it. Just like Bush/Rove.

I can't blame him for being reluctant to face Obama, though. He's been shot down before.



Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 26, 2008 at 10:18 am

Sharon,

So you're saying that the Bush administration has been so destructive that the next president will have to spend his time putting the country back together.

Yes. One more reason Bush II is competing for worst president ever.

Paul,

Maybe McCain's has kind of a kamikaze strategy--you can't shoot him down if he's already exploded.


Posted by Perspective, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 26, 2008 at 10:43 am

I am absolutely appalled, Sharon if what you say is true about earmarks for ACORN, LaRaza and National Urban League...

Please provide the link. I can't believe the "audacity" of doing this if it it true.

I don't like a lot about McCain, but if he lives up to his word and VETOES any and all earmarks when he is President, I almost don't care what else he does.

BTW, go to www.wsj.com opinion page for this day and read the proposal by Paulson ( different one) for how we manage this "bail-out"...make taxpayers investors like Bennet's buying, instead of tax "back ups", and get us, the taxpayers, a chance to actually make a profit off this debacle.

What to you all think?


Posted by Perspective, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 26, 2008 at 10:45 am

I lived through the constant repetition of "worst president ever" with Reagan...saying it over and over like a primary school kid doesn't make it true.

Unfortunately, constant repetition of "the sky is falling" economic talk CAN bring some of it true..as we are experiencing today.

Congratulations!

BTW, has anyone else noticed that, with Dems in control in the House and Senate, there isn't a grand investigation into WHO IS TO BLAME for this mess? Wonder why? Could it be because the Dems don't want the truth being laid out for the public?

I sure hope McCain is elected and mandates a 9/11 type commission. I love that idea


Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 26, 2008 at 11:05 am

Resident

re "I am absolutely appalled, Sharon if what you say is true about earmarks for ACORN, LaRaza and National Urban League...

Please provide the link. I can't believe the "audacity" of doing this if it it true."


Here is a link Web Link


Posted by Just wondering, a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Sep 26, 2008 at 11:09 am

It's over for McCain. Check out the picture on CNN.com of him and Cindy boarding a plane. He is not even wearing a flag pin in his lapel. Why does he hate America so much??? Just wondering


Posted by Paul, a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 26, 2008 at 11:32 am

"Maybe McCain's has kind of a kamikaze strategy--you can't shoot him down if he's already exploded."

Well, Palin flamed out on him and he's deadsticking it. Time to bail and he knows it.



Posted by Peter, a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Sep 26, 2008 at 11:47 am

Statement By McCain Campaign On NegotiationsWeb Link

John McCain's decision to suspend his campaign was made in the hopes that politics could be set aside to address our economic crisis.

In response, Americans saw a familiar spectacle in Washington.
At a moment of crisis that threatened the economic security of American families, Washington played the blame game rather than work together to find a solution that would avert a collapse of financial markets without squandering hundreds of billions of taxpayers' money to bailout bankers and brokers who bet their fortunes on unsafe lending practices. ........

The difference between Barack Obama and John McCain was apparent during the White House meeting yesterday where Barack Obama's priority was political posturing in his opening monologue defending the package as it stands.
John McCain listened to all sides so he could help focus the debate on finding a bipartisan resolution that is in the interest of taxpayers and homeowners.
The Democratic interests stood together in opposition to an agreement that would accommodate additional taxpayer protections. ....
Following the debate, he will return to Washington to ensure that all voices and interests are represented in the final agreement, especially those of taxpayers and homeowners.


Posted by DM, a resident of Leland Manor/Garland Drive
on Sep 26, 2008 at 12:21 pm



The Democrats are not about to be stubborn.
They know their package is a lemon and need the political cover of Republican support.
So the Republicans can write their own ticket…and they will.
John McCain will be at the center of the emerging compromise while Obama is out on the campaign trail kissing babies.
If the deal is cut before Friday's debate, my bet is that McCain shows up in triumph.
If it isn't, he shows up anyway and flagellates Obama over the differences between the Democratic package and McCain's.

By Monday, at the latest, the Democrats have to cave in and pass the Republican version.
They don't dare pass their own without GOP support, so they will have to cave in to the Republican version.
Then McCain comes out of the process as the hero who made it happen when the president couldn't and Obama wouldn't.


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 26, 2008 at 12:49 pm

Perspective,

I think Congress is trying to figure out how to get us out of this mess before launching any sort of investigation.

Reagan was a bad president. George Bush II is worse. It's that simple. Bad on civil liberties, bad on the rule of law, bad on the economy, bad on foreign policy. He's weakened us as a country--and it was unecessary.

Meanwhile, Osama bin Laden hangs out in a cave somewhere.

DM,

McCain's "suspended" campaign seems to have amounted to a cancelled David Letterman appearance--his ads continued, his offices remained open and he did three different television interviews.

He did get in the way of the bail-out negotiations by showing up and sort of winging it, adding support to a fringe Republican group with an unworkable plan. He damaged Bush a little more.

Paul,

Yeah, I keep wondering if the guy's bailing--looks at the news and wonders if he really wants to spend his golden years trying to deal with this mess.


Posted by Paul, a resident of Downtown North
on Sep 26, 2008 at 12:52 pm

I see the debate is back on. Washington decided it didn't want McCain's "help," so he's off his stealth campaign and back on his overt one.

He really never did quit campaigning, he just temporarily changed his campaign mode until he found it wasn't working. So much for his touted principled ministration to the national crisis which, BTW, goes on as McCain flipflops.



Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 26, 2008 at 1:00 pm

Paul,

It wasn't as if either McCain or Obama sat on the relevant committees. McCain hasn't shown up in the Senate for six months. It was all show and no go.

At this point, he's bugging the traditional rich Republican pro-business segment. I think there's a certain segment of the GOP at this point that may not vote for Obama, but won't mind it if he wins either--they can blame him for whatever happens and not have to worry about McCain's totally daffy judgment.


Posted by Peter, a resident of another community
on Sep 26, 2008 at 2:40 pm

Actually, McCain showed up at the White House meeting, listened for most of it, and brought up proposals that had already been debated and discarded. He admitted that he had not read the Agreement in Principle, which is all of three pages long. (see various news reports, not opinion columns -- including the New York Times.) Looks to me as if he didn't really have a clue and was just injecting himself (he brought a campaign aide to the meeting) for political gain.

Sen. Obama on the other hand, has been talking to Paulson (every day) and Congressional leaders during the whole megillah, staying informed and contributing when needed.


Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 26, 2008 at 4:00 pm



preemptive debate synopsis

Just to save you all some time this evening, should you wish to go bowling or some such.

Obama: "This is a Republican financial crisis, let me just highlight that. Solution? Change. Because we don't need more of the same."

McCain: "First of all, let me go on record as saying Black is Beautiful — and that yes, Republicans share the blame for the culture of corruption in Washington. Beyond that, though — are you f---ing kidding me with that bullshit?"

Moderator: "Thank you, gentlemen.

Incidentally, point deducted from Senator McCain for coded racism, which we'll identify once we have a chance to think about it."


Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 26, 2008 at 4:00 pm



preemptive debate synopsis

Just to save you all some time this evening, should you wish to go bowling or some such.

Obama: "This is a Republican financial crisis, let me just highlight that. Solution? Change. Because we don't need more of the same."

McCain: "First of all, let me go on record as saying Black is Beautiful — and that yes, Republicans share the blame for the culture of corruption in Washington. Beyond that, though — are you f---ing kidding me with that bullshit?"

Moderator: "Thank you, gentlemen.

Incidentally, point deducted from Senator McCain for coded racism, which we'll identify once we have a chance to think about it."


Posted by Sharon, a resident of Midtown
on Sep 26, 2008 at 4:00 pm



preemptive debate synopsis

Just to save you all some time this evening, should you wish to go bowling or some such.

Obama: "This is a Republican financial crisis, let me just highlight that. Solution? Change. Because we don't need more of the same."

McCain: "First of all, let me go on record as saying Black is Beautiful — and that yes, Republicans share the blame for the culture of corruption in Washington. Beyond that, though — are you f---ing kidding me with that bullshit?"

Moderator: "Thank you, gentlemen.

Incidentally, point deducted from Senator McCain for coded racism, which we'll identify once we have a chance to think about it."


Posted by OhlonePar, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Sep 26, 2008 at 9:47 pm

Peter,

The grandstanding was pretty pathetic. McCain managed to annoy both parties with his stunt.

Sharon,

I think your own code issues are showing here.


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