Palo Alto Weekly

Arts & Entertainment - November 12, 2010

Worth a look

Art

David Hibbard

The title of landscape photographer David Hibbard's current exhibition, "Terra Cognita," is a play on the world of the old explorers. While they sailed off into the lands beyond the map, Hibbard has revisited many places he knows well, including the San Mateo County Coastside, a canyon in the Santa Cruz Mountains and the wilderness beaches of Olympic National Park in Washington state.

"Each is a source of renewal and inspiration for my photographic work and I return to them often," Hibbard wrote in an artist's statement. "All have been affected to some degree by environmental degradation, yet each, in its own way, retains a semi-wild, undomesticated vibrancy — a quality that I try to convey through my photographs."

Hibbard is currently showing 49 prints from the "Terra Cognita" series at the Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Road. At a reception today, Nov. 12, he'll give a talk on the art of landscape photography, and speak about several of his particular projects. Hibbard's talk starts at 3:30 p.m. in Pake Auditorium, with a reception following from 4:30 to 6.

Afterward, the exhibition runs through Jan. 3, open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. To arrange to see the show, call curator Lisa Fahey at 650-812-4489. For more about the photographer, go to http://davidhibbardphotography.com .

'Dynamic Rhythms'

Sculptor Fletcher Benton is probably best known in Palo Alto for his outdoor piece "Tilted Donut #5" at the soccer fields at El Camino Real and Page Mill Road. More of his work can currently be seen indoors — and a bit smaller — at the Smith Andersen Editions gallery.

Benton's show, "Dynamic Rhythms," features 13 abstract maquettes (models), steel studies and wall pieces, all made between 1995 and 2010 and ranging in size from 5 inches to 6 feet. Lines and geometric shapes are important throughout. Benton has been exhibiting his work for five decades, and his pieces are in the permanent collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and other institutions.

The exhibition runs through Jan. 5 at 440 Pepper Ave. in Palo Alto, open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and by appointment. Go to http://smithandersen.com or call 650-327-7762.

Theater

'CTRL-ALT-DELETE'

You may want to just leave Silicon Valley at the office when the workday ends. But in case you don't, the Pear Avenue Theatre is presenting the comic play "CTRL-ALT-DELETE," a contemporary piece written by San Francisco native Anthony Clarvoe.

The story, which takes place in 2000, follows the evolution of an amazing machine: part cell phone, part computer. (Gasp!) Themes of greed, scruples, ambition and PR are woven throughout.

Directed by TheatreWorks resident dramaturg Vickie Rozell, the show runs through Nov. 21 at the Pear, 1220 Pear Ave., Unit K, Mountain View. Show times are Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2. Tickets are $15-$30, with discounts available for students and seniors. Go to http://thepear.org or call 650-254-1148.

Books

Amy Sedaris

Don't have the spare cash to buy each of your Recession-era kids an iPad? Never fret. Amy Sedaris wouldn't. Why, she'd just whip out some legumes and foliage and other stuff, and suddenly it's family craft time! Before the youngsters know it, they'll be making bean-and-leaf mosaics, tinfoil balls and crepe-paper moccasins. Take that, Steve Jobs.

Sedaris, a writer, comedian and actress, has folded together her nifty crafting tips in her latest book, "Simple Times: Crafts For Poor People." Coming on the heels of "I Like You: Hospitality Under the Influence," the tongue-in-cheek book initiates readers into the world of crafting.

At 7:30 p.m. next Wednesday, Nov. 17, Sedaris will be speaking in Palo Alto for a very serious cause. As a benefit for Breast Cancer Connections, she's appearing at Spangenberg Theatre at Gunn High School, 780 Arastradero Road.

The talk is under the auspices of Kepler's Books in Menlo Park. To buy tickets to the event ($38 for one ticket plus a copy of "Simple Times," and $45 for two tickets and two books), go to http://keplers.com . For more information, call 650-324-4321.

Music

Elana Jagoda family concert

She has a background as a Jewish cantorial soloist, but Elana Jagoda also has a less traditional side. Jagoda's folk-rock songs for kids have punch and humor.

Example: her sprightly tune "Good Job God," which thanks the Almighty for creating all the animals, mountains and other things on this planet. At one point she sings: "How about them upside-down opossums? Good job, God; I think they're awesome."

Jagoda is set to perform in Palo Alto at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 14, singing with the Zum Gali band at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way. Tickets are $15 general, $12 for JCC members and students, $5 for kids ages 14 and under, and free for "lap children" ages 2 and under. To buy tickets, go to http://paloaltojcc.org or call 1-800-838-3006.

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