Palo Alto Weekly

Community Pulse - August 27, 2010

Deaths

Nelee Langmuir

Nelee Langmuir, 78, Holocaust survivor and Stanford French lecturer since 1972, died Aug. 11 in her Stanford home of cancer.

She was born in Paris in 1931 to a Lithuanian couple. After the 1940 Nazi invasion of France, she found shelter with her sister in Chabanais, France, from local Resistance leader Albert Béraud. When World War II ended, her family immigrated to Sacramento.

She married Paul Wanner and had two daughters. Meanwhile she taught adult classes in French at Menlo-Atherton High School. In 1972, she received a master's degree from Stanford.

Later that year she divorced Wanner and married Gavin Langmuir, a founder of Stanford's Jewish Studies program and the Program in Medieval Studies. In 1979 and 1980 she and her husband taught at the Stanford-in-France program. She won the Walter J. Gores award for excellent teaching in 1979. She taught at Stanford until 2008.

She made a film, "Tombées du Ciel," about her family's Holocaust survival. The movie will be shown at a Stanford screening April 28, 2011.

She is survived by her sister Mina Parsont of Gaithersburg, Md.; daughters Jennifer Wanner of San Francisco and Debra Wanner of New York City; stepdaughter, Valerie Langmuir of Millbrae; two sons-in-law and two granddaughters.

A memorial service is scheduled for 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 12, at Stanford Memorial Church. Memorial donations may earmarked for the Nelee Langmuir Award and made out to Stanford University. Donations should be sent to Taube Center for Jewish Studies, 450 Serra Mall, Building 360, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305.

Nancy Stewart

Nancy Stewart, 51, a resident of Atherton and Menlo Park, died unexpectedly from a heart arrhythmia episode that took place Aug. 6 and led to her death on Aug. 13.

Born in San Francisco, she moved to Atherton with her family in 1965. She attended Castilleja School and graduated from the University of Southern California with a bachelor's degree in history. She was a member of the Phi Alpha Theta National History Honor Society and Alpha Delta Pi sorority.

In event management for most of her career, she coordinated the international conferences at SRI International and later worked as a manager of executive conferences at Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International in San Jose. In that position she traveled all over the world and enjoyed the excitement and challenges of running conferences overseas, say family members.

In 2006, she became event and volunteer manager at Children's Health Council, where her primary task was handling all management aspects of the Summer Symphony fundraising event at Frost Amphitheater.

She volunteered for a number of nonprofit organizations. She served as president of the Castilleja Alumni Board and a number of other committees connected to the school. She served as president of the USC Golden Gate Alumnae Club board, as well as a member of the USC Bay Area student recruitment committee.

A founding member of Foothill Auxiliary, a fundraising branch of the Family Service Agency of San Mateo County, she recently served as the board's secretary. She was a former member of the Junior League and the Committee for Art at Stanford.

Her gracious style and many talents were widely admired, said family members. Cooking was her passion and photography, needlepoint, and gardening were significant hobbies. She considered London her home away from home. Her final act of extreme generosity was as an organ donor, say family members.

Survivors include her father, Robert Stewart, and sister Ellen Stewart Moore. Her mother, Verna Stewart, preceded her in death.

Services for will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, Aug. 27, at Valley Presbyterian Church, 945 Portola Road in Portola Valley.

Memorials in her name may be made to the Nancy Stewart Memorial Fund at Children's Health Council, 650 Clark Way, Palo Alto, CA 94304; or online at www.chconline.org.

Conrad Welling

Conrad G. Welling, 91, a resident of Atherton, died Aug. 20.

He was born in St. Louis, Mo., but spent his youth in Houston, Texas. At the age of 17 he joined the military and eventually earned his wings as a naval aviator. During his 20-year career with the military he flew a wide range of aircraft which included carrier landings with the S2-F.

His tours also included one at the Pentagon, where he contributed in the development of the Polaris missile program. After retiring he went on to develop another career with Lockheed Missiles and Space.

He formed an industrial partnership, International Minerals Company, to investigate the potential of marine minerals. Through his leadership, Lockheed Ocean Minerals Company, an international consortium, became the first U.S. licensee under the Deep Seabed Hard Mineral Resources Act and in 1978 successfully tested a remotely operated mining vehicle.

He was a much beloved father whose positive outlook on life and love of his family was always in evidence, family members said. He had a happy 62-year marriage to Bunny

Welling, who preceded him in death in 2006.

He is survived by his children Conrad G. Welling of San Diego, Bonnie Welling of Atherton and Patricia Leugers of Atherton, son-in-law Jerome Leugers; and two grandchildren.

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