News

Palo Alto ranks third among 'top-earning towns'

City residents trail those in Bethesda, Greenwich in median income

Palo Alto in the third highest-income city in the nation, according to CNN Money Magazine. It trails behind Bethesda, Md., and Greenwich, Conn. in CNN Money Magazine's 2010 list of "top-earning towns."

"Palo Alto is awash in high-tech prosperity. Stanford professors, Facebook engineers and venture capitalists are neighbors in this Silicon Valley town," the magazine said.

Median family income in Palo Alto is $153,615, and the median home price is $1,180,000, the magazine said.

In Bethesda, home to many federal government employees and other Washington-area professionals, median family income is $172,541, but homes cost less -- $725,000 is the median price.

In New York City's tony bedroom community of Greenwich, median family income is $164,807 and the median home price is $997,498.

Behind Bethesda, Greenwich and Palo Alto in the list are Newport Beach, Lower Merion, Pa., Newton, Mass., Fairfield, Conn., Greenburgh, N.Y., Burke, Va., and Naperville, Ill.

Comments

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Posted by Old Palo Alto
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 22, 2010 at 12:57 pm

We love to rank things don't we? How about something meaningful, like what town has the happiest residents? Then try to figure out why.....


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Posted by Amused
a resident of another community
on Jul 22, 2010 at 1:07 pm

To Old Palo Alto's point: Amen!


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Posted by Ignorance is bliss
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Jul 22, 2010 at 1:17 pm

Old Palo Alto: Perhaps you moved here when the housing prices were less expensive. For those successful enough to be able to afford to purchase a home in Palo Alto within the last decade, ranking is a big deal. Such successful people are accustomed to being the top of their class.

The happiest residents would be in some small, rural town because life is so simple and complacent. Certainly, the happiest residents won't be found in big, rat race cities or suburbs.


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Posted by Old Palo Alto
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 22, 2010 at 1:48 pm

"Old Palo Alto: Perhaps you moved here when the housing prices were less expensive. For those successful enough to be able to afford to purchase a home in Palo Alto within the last decade, ranking is a big deal. Such successful people are accustomed to being the top of their class.

The happiest residents would be in some small, rural town because life is so simple and complacent. Certainly, the happiest residents won't be found in big, rat race cities or suburbs."

Strange logic....so, success means you were in the top of your class, live in a "rat race" city and are unhappy?

I think lots of people try to find ways to prove to themselves that they are superior to others. This is an exercise in futility, as you'll find you're never good enough. Which further perpetuates their insecurity, need to be competitive, and leads them to unhappiness.

I was not in top of my class, by far. I moved to Palo Alto about 15 years ago, own many properties in Palo Alto, and am very happy. If you gauge success having more money than others, then I'm successful. I gauge success by how much I make a meaningful contribution to others, which ironically, has led to financial great wealth for me. I think a person that is honest, kind, and considerate is far more successful than someone who amasses claim checks on society (ie money). I think the time you spend with others (especially children) in a meaningful way is more valuable than anything you can buy.


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Posted by Ignorance is bliss
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Jul 22, 2010 at 2:32 pm

Old PA,

I completely agree with you that children are often underappreciated these days, and pawned off to daycare an nannies. I think it is fantastic that some choose to not have children and it is okay nowadays.

You are generalizing re happy residents. There are many who live in a rat race city and are happy and successful, yet some have not attained their goals and are not happy. However to find a town where everyone is happy, it would have to be those with the simple life where they do not strive for more.

When people think of "success", they generally think of being financially successful. Face it, scraping for money to pay the mortgage is no party. However, I agree that money isn't everything and there are plenty of financially successful people who are unhappy and will never be satisfied with themselves. We lived in the midwest in a custom built, 7000sf house on a 6 acre, wooded lot and tons of disposable income. Were we happy? No, because we were bored silly and didn't enjoy the people there. We now live in a 1900sf, 50 year old house in PA and are incredibly happy in this community.

Your posting implies that you tripped upon huge sums of cash with little effort. If everyone had their way, they would be financially successful and have time to donate their time and money to others, which, as you mention, brings true happiness. But life is not perfect for everyone.


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Posted by pat
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 22, 2010 at 4:40 pm

1. The article confuses Greenwich, CT (ranked #2) and Greenwich Village in NYC.

2. Americans were happiest in the 1950s after WWII, before consumerism. Then came retail analyst, Victor LeBeau: "Our enormously productive economy…demands that we make consumption our way of life, that we convert the buying and use of goods into rituals, that we seek our spiritual satisfaction, our ego satisfaction, in consumption…we need things consumed, burned up, replaced and discarded at an ever-accelerating rate." www.storyofstuff.com


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Posted by Bob
a resident of Barron Park
on Jul 22, 2010 at 5:32 pm

@ Pat,
I don't think there's a confusion. Greenwich is indeed a bedroom community of NYC, in the same way that Summit, NJ or Rye, NY might be. It's about a half hour on Metro-North away from Grand Central. The preponderance of Greenwich households have a NYC commuter.
Interestingly, the reason Greenwich grew as a wealthy enclave was the lack of an income tax in CT (that lasted until the early 1990s). A reminder that people do, indeed, respond to incentives (see Philadelphia and their disastrous wage tax as an example of what happens when taxes are aimed at mobile high earners.)


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Posted by Bob
a resident of Barron Park
on Jul 22, 2010 at 5:36 pm

@ Pat,
Not to be petulant, but I'd also qualify the point about happiness in the '50s; it's not clear that the happiness was evenly distributed (as those sitting at the back of the bus or not allowed at the counter at Woolworth's). I'll also note that the '50s were marked by two recessions, although the 1957 one was far more crushing. Most of what we believe about the 50s is a function of the sepia-toned youthful memories of boomers.


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Posted by Old Palo Alto
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 22, 2010 at 5:54 pm

Productivity leads to happiness which leads to wealth. And in that order.

Our obsession with ranking who's/what's best is absurd, and leads to people, especially kids try to get into "good schools," down the path of depression, etc. I have several people working for me that went to the "good schools," and some are great, others are not. I have several people working for me that never went to school, and some are great, others are not. The ranking does not define the person.

I started a company from scratch, worked 12 or more hours a day (still do) at something I love, and have subsequently become happy and financially successful. I'm not quite 40 yet, so I've been luckier than most. I have never worked for money, but ironically have lots of it now. And if I didn't any money, I wouldn't be any less happy, and in a lot of ways I'd be more happy. If I had good friends and something to be productive at in Omaha, NE, I'd be just as happy there as in Palo Alto.


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Posted by Just Wondering
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 22, 2010 at 6:28 pm

What proportion of Palo Alto residents are tightwads income notwithstanding? Any guesses? Mine is 86%.


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Posted by musical
a resident of Palo Verde
on Jul 22, 2010 at 6:47 pm

Happiness has many dimensions. We are all happy about some things and unhappy about others. And so must we formulate our priorities. In aggregate, unhappy people in Palo Alto would have plenty of reasons to be unhappy anywhere else. We relocate as our priorities evolve.

What are the median family income statistics? What counts as a family? How many families does Palo Alto have and how many residents of Palo Alto are not considered to be in a family? Are they only counting families that have someone with a full-time job? Do retirees count? The $153K figure just looks a little high to me. I guess all the single people who live in apartments or low cost housing are not counted. And certainly not college students or the homeless.


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Posted by a mom
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 22, 2010 at 9:58 pm

I live here by choice, but I'm a little confused about the average house price. They must be counting condos?

If I look at my family's income after paying for just housing and medical in this town, I think we qualify for the designation "house poor".

It's a strange position to be in: I feel really lucky, I love the schools, the weather, the beauty of the area, high quality local produce, etc., and no way are we anything but affluent based on our income -- but we have no money to travel (I mean not even for Christmas or family weddings, if it involves an airplane), no money for eating out much or expensive hobbies like going skiing, we clip coupons, shop at Target and Costco, never buy any extras. My one splurge is a good hairdresser. We have no debt, not even car debt, and we save for retirement. So again, I consider myself lucky (and careful). But if I look at what's left after mortgage, property tax, medical, food, utilities, etc., month to month, there's nothing. Sometimes we even have to borrow to pay the property tax until we can file our tax returns, because they limit the exemptions you can take during the year so much, we always have to overpay our taxes and it's that tight until we get the difference back.

I'm not complaining, we choose to live here. But I think people read those things elsewhere and think we're on Easy Street here. Maybe we are, but it's in a million dollar shack...


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Posted by Tim
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 22, 2010 at 10:52 pm

Wow! Palo Alto is third, but some want the city employees to be pay the national avg. Is there anyway to find out how city employees live in Palo Alto?


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Posted by EPA Resident
a resident of East Palo Alto
on Jul 23, 2010 at 6:00 am

Interesting that of the 3 cities Palo Alto's median income is the lowest but the housing prices are the highest. I would have thought those would correlate.


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Posted by Mike
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 23, 2010 at 9:11 am

This idea that 85% of PA residents are 'tightwads' or are somehow undesirable humans is an unjustified stereotype.

In my many years here I have found that an astounding percentage of the population is involved meaningfully in one or more charities or organizations via volunteer work, financial contributions or both.

By and large, this is not a town where the constant dominant thought is acquisition of the latest biggest flat screen or coolest car. I don't always agree with my fellow citizens politics, but most of them contribute a great deal back to the community and society.


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Posted by pat
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 23, 2010 at 9:29 am

Bob, I don't think you're at all being petulant by pointing out the uneven distribution of happiness in the 50s. It's easy to forget that racism, segregation and other social evils were still so prevalent in those days, plus cold war fears of nuclear attacks.

Here's an interesting article, related to expectations and spending: "Life not better during 1950s, just happier"
Web Link


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Posted by Bob
a resident of Barron Park
on Jul 23, 2010 at 9:46 am

Well, at least it's great to see that the San Jose-Sunnyvale Metro Statistical Area is the #7 happiest MSA in the country.

Web Link


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Posted by YIMBY
a resident of University South
on Jul 23, 2010 at 10:48 am

YIMBY is a registered user.

As someone already noted, it is indeed Greenwich, CT not Greenwich Village.
Here's the article Web Link
Note - 25 pages for 25 cities, I believe.


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Posted by Busy
a resident of Crescent Park
on Jul 23, 2010 at 11:30 am

Maybe everyone with the time to make these long comments could help Chris Kenrick proofread his articles.


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Posted by another mom
a resident of Ventura
on Jul 23, 2010 at 11:55 am

I so agree with 'Mom'. I also choose to live here, in the same zip code where I grew up. I was able to visit my mother daily for her final illness, visit my dad several times a week. My sister lives under a mile from me, my In-laws 2 miles, my sister and brother in law about the same. The weather is great, and my kids go to excellent schools, the same ones I went to! I feel lucky to live so close, and can be so involved with my family. But I have not had a vacation in years, could not afford plane tickets to my nephews graduation, all because I own a home here.
Not everyone moved here for the prestige, and It is hard to live in a place where my kids friends have movie theatres in their basements, and go to paris for spring break.
As Mom said, it is a choice, and I know why I made mine, and what my values are, But on occasion it is possible to feel kind of poor, even thought I know I am rich.
I highly recommend a copy of the sierra club book "Material World, a Global Family Portrait." I turn to it for reality check.


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Posted by Yid
a resident of another community
on Jul 23, 2010 at 11:59 am

These surveys are worthless as they do not control for cost of living. For example, if a family in Dallas, Texas was making $100,000, it would be equivalent to $250,000 in Palo Alto. While I love the Silicon Valley area, I always find it astonishing that most people that I talk with are not aware of this significant difference in cost of living.


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Posted by Floyd
a resident of Green Acres
on Jul 23, 2010 at 11:59 am

I read an automobile article in the NYTimes a while back that referred to the car's ( BREAKS ) so think Mr. Kenrick can be forgiven.


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Posted by Grandma
a resident of Meadow Park
on Jul 23, 2010 at 12:46 pm

Wow, you mean Palo Alto ranks higher in per capita income than Atherton, Woodside, Hillsborough and Los Altos Hills - I find that hard to believe.

It is true that the founders of GOOGLE, Apple and Facebook live in PA but the wealth is rather concentrated in a few high tech bosses!!!

It is also a fact that nearly 40% of PA residents are over 50, making us one of the oldest communities in the U.S. Many retirees are like me living on social security but we just happened to have bought our houses 30-40 years ago - we can't afford to move.


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Posted by Hard to believe
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 23, 2010 at 1:02 pm

As I go for my morning walk along Louis and Greer, it doesn't seem like the residents of those houses are among the third richest in the U.S.!!


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Posted by fireman
a resident of another community
on Jul 23, 2010 at 1:13 pm

HTB,, there are many other to make up for them, it is an average.


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Posted by Barbara Brown
a resident of Menlo Park
on Jul 23, 2010 at 2:40 pm

Chris Kenrick is a woman. She has written some excellent articles on education.


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Posted by palo alto mom
a resident of Embarcadero Oaks/Leland
on Jul 23, 2010 at 3:44 pm

Atherton, Los Altos Hills, etc. are probably too small to be included as a City, event though their net income is probably higher.


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Posted by chris
a resident of University South
on Jul 23, 2010 at 6:27 pm


The lower population cut-off was 50,000.


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Posted by Midtown
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 24, 2010 at 8:03 am

The velocity of upscaling in Palo Alto (the Maserati that keeps buzzing by me on the way to Trader Joe's, the hedge fund conversations at coffee shops, the people who buy two houses/lots
in Very Old Palo Alto because one property is not big enough) is becoming exponential. The very few are getting very rich, and flaunting it in a "I'm better than you" style. If anyone needed proof that in this economy the disparity between rich and poor has grown enormous, visit Palo Alto. That that wealth is "shamelessly" (what a quaint word!) displayed reminds me that short of higher taxes (or a next depression) , there is going to be no way to rein in the greedy.


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Posted by Jenny
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Jul 24, 2010 at 9:01 am

Geez, I just don't see it. We definitely are two cities, the dividing line being Oregon Expressway. I live opposite a very run down and dilapidated Cubberley Community Center. in the farthest south-east corner of Palo Alto in a little 1,100 sq. ft. home built in 1951.

I suppose those living north of Oregon Expressway are dragging me into this elite stratosphere even if I do live midway between GOOGLE and Facebook, and my ridiculous little house is worth over $1 Million!!!


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Posted by susan
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 24, 2010 at 10:34 am

There's something messed up when the kids at Gunn and Paly are driving new BMW's and the teachers are driving 10 year old beat up Honda Civics. What's with our values? They don't call it Shallow Alto for nothing .........


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Posted by pat
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 24, 2010 at 11:01 am

>"As I go for my morning walk along Louis and Greer, it doesn't seem like the residents of those houses are among the third richest in the U.S.!!"

There are some monster homes along Louis/Greer/Colorado. On the corner of Colorado (Randers Drive) there's a house for sale for $3,999,000. Web Link


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Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 24, 2010 at 11:39 am

This is also the home of boomerang generation, or so it appears!


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Posted by Nuts-o-rama
a resident of Adobe-Meadows
on Jul 24, 2010 at 1:53 pm

pat, wow, that's pretty incredible. The sellers must be nuts. Anyone looking to spend $4M on a house in Palo Alto is not going to settle for an 8700 sf lot right by a busy street that's not in one of the big prestige neighborhoods north of Oregon. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love my south-of-Oregon neighborhood and wouldn't want to live anywhere else...but those sellers are obviously delusional. Watch that house stay on the market for the rest of the year.


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Posted by Palo Alto values
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Jul 24, 2010 at 7:53 pm

The remarks about cars driven in this city remind me of how often we witness the very public expression of PA values and self-expression: Hummer, Prius, BMW, Tesla and...Maserati??? Wow I must have missed that one.


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Posted by old palo alto
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 25, 2010 at 12:38 am

I see a lot of good in these ranking articles, it makes our city seem great and increases our home values. The average income seems fair, many educated professionals that reside in Palo Alto (I am not including Apple and Google founders) like lawyers and doctors make hundreds of thousands, while other professionals make a lot less, so an average seems correct. As far as cars driven, a car is a personal thing and a form of self expression and a hubby. Many very rich drive Priuses and Jeeps and others drive Ferraris. It all helps the bottom line since the Ferrari owner had to pay higher state sales tax on his car which helps our roads. This town is full of A type driven personalities an stress is their fuel, they would not be happy somewhere in the mid west doing nothing. We are very lucky here, good schools, great weather, proximity to excellent health care, ocean, organic food. It is very expensive, good things usually are. Enjoy!


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Posted by Jenny
a resident of Charleston Gardens
on Jul 25, 2010 at 10:14 am

Old Palo Alto obviously lives in a totally different environment than I do in South Palo Alto opposite Cubberley. We have a lot of retirees I saw them all in Mitchell Park last night listening to the Twilight Concert!!


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Posted by Nuts-o-rama
a resident of Adobe-Meadows
on Jul 25, 2010 at 6:39 pm

Indeed. A list of the most popular cars in my neighborhood would go something like this: Prius (by far), Sienna and Odyssey minivans, Camry (half of which are the hybrid version).

I really like how despite how almost everyone here is living in $1M houses, all that tacky conspicuous consumption you see on "Housewives of Orange County" (and perhaps Hillsborough, Lamorinda,...), etc. is nowhere to be found.


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Posted by A Palo Alto parent
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jul 25, 2010 at 9:08 pm

For a good read about places where people rate themselves as happiest, try The Geography of Bliss. The places aren't related to income or finances, they relate to other factors. As for the 50's, if I had lived through WWII, I'd be happy just to be around. Part of happiness depends on where you come from, and where you're heading.


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Posted by Keep capitalism alive
a resident of Jordan Middle School
on Jul 25, 2010 at 11:43 pm

What I've witnessed from reading this forum the last three years is that the people who complain of "Shallow Alto" and excessive elitism usually live in South Palo Alto according to their postings. They must have self-esteem issues to be envious enough to hurl insults at complete strangers from behind their computers. What do they want? Communism so all is fair? I live in North PA but in a small house and have not noticed any elitism. We trick-or-treat in Old PA and admire the houses rather than disdain. If I could afford a Tesla (and had a garage to store it), I would buy one because they are electric and nice looking, not because I would want to show off and hurt people's feelings. Kids who drive BMWs? So what? It's a free, capitalistic country. They earned it; let them have fun.


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Posted by thank you
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 26, 2010 at 12:07 am

TO: "Keep Capitalism Alive". Thank you. You summarized very eloquently exactly what my feelings are on this subject. We came from lower middle class families who stressed education above all else, so after many years of college and graduate school, paying off student loans, working 60 hour weeks, delaying having children till our mid-thirties, we now own a gorgeous house in Old PA and drive cars of our choice.


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Posted by litebug
a resident of another community
on Jul 26, 2010 at 12:28 pm

Nuts-o-rama is so right-on!

We moved from P.A. in 8/08. That property had already been cleared of at least two houses and it was clear that only one would take its place. We wondered about the sanity of that at the time. A $4M house essentially behind the Midtown Shopping Center in a "modest" (by P.A. standards) neighborhood by a busy street? HA! Guess the builders forgot the old maxim of "location location location" being the most important thing.

We were dinged for over-improving for our modest neighborhood when the difference between our house and some others on our street was modest. Someone is going to get a quite a deal on this white elephant, some time in the future, but then they'll be stuck with it.

Hearing these same old tied arguments between North and South P.A. is quite tiresome. Over the years there have been fine, big homes built in South P.A. and there have always been pockets of "modest" neighborhoods in North P.A. I lived in one of them, rammed up against the Southbound 101 freeway ramp.

As a resident of P.A. from 1970-2008 I can attest to the changes in the town, and I'm not talking about just the physical changes. There was definitely a marked change in the "vibe" of the town over the years, particularly in the past 20, and it was most definitely NOT for the better, in my opinion.

It is a breath of fresh air living in a place without P.A.'s pretentiousness and over-competitiveness, not to mention its outrageous living expenses, over-crowding, noise and traffic. This small city where we now live is managed far better than P.A. with its endless wrangling and increasingly compromised quality of life. Things actually get done here, even in tough times, and without the wealthy base of P.A. We have new fire, police, civic, library and school buildings and a very clean town where the quality of life is more important than conspicuous consumption. You see a lot of old pickup trucks here and few fancy cars. I think a teenager with a BMW would not only stick out like a sore thumb, it would be frowned upon for the excess that it represents, rather than celebrated (what teenager has "earned" a BMW?).

We aren't as famous and wealthy here but our teenagers don't commit suicide on a routine basis! What worse indictment can there be of the collective mental health, or "culture" of P.A. in recent times than all of the teenage suicides?


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Posted by Pass It On
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 26, 2010 at 2:53 pm

All you writers who have lots of money (and, evidently, from your self description) a desire to help your community...may I suggest making a donation to Palo Alto Library Foundation? There are (believe it or not) in our fair city many families who can't afford to buy books. Even for those of us who can afford to buy them, borrowing is better.

Our public libraries are trying to raise $6 million to buy books and furniture for the future improved and expanded Palo Alto libraries. We can help to make sure everyone in our community has access to books. Go to palf.org It's easy. I made my donation last week.


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Posted by Resident
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 26, 2010 at 3:03 pm

I do not think we should donate to buy books for 5 libraries. We will soon have to pay for these 5 libraries in our property taxes when they come round.

If we have money to donate, how about donating money for more bike parking around town with a few signs telling us where the bike parking is to be found. This would help our community as apart from helping cyclists to find somewhere safe to leave their bike, it would also protect our young trees!

I will not donate for 5 duplicate collections. When we have one decent library, I would consider donating.


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Posted by BMWs? Really!? Hoooey.
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 26, 2010 at 3:05 pm

I work on traffic for the PTA. A third of Paly and Gunn students ride bikes to school. Even more walk or ride the shuttle or VTA buses. Some students drive. VERY few have "brand new BMWs". I check out the parking lots regularly. These are good kids. We don't have funding for school buses so driving, for some kids who travel longer distances or who have jobs after school, is a necessity.

Most of the kids in this community are hard-working, community oriented young people. I look at most of them with pride. Honestly, does PA Online attract every carmudgeon in the city? Spend some time volunteering at one of our high schools. You'll be impressed with these young people...and with our faculty who do a LOT with the resources they have. (Putting in a little volunteer time might give you some healthy perspective--and improve your outlook on life.)

Get to know these young people...and stick to the facts. Our kids deserve better.


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Posted by pat
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 26, 2010 at 3:42 pm

>"We moved from P.A. in 8/08. That property had already been cleared of at least two houses and it was clear that only one would take its place."

There were 2 houses cleared (at Colorado & Randers) and 2 houses built. The owner of the two lives in the house on the corner and is trying to sell the second for $3.999M

>"Our public libraries are trying to raise $6 million to buy books and furniture."

It's absurd to have 5 libraries for 60,000 people. There are better places to donate your money.


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Posted by Native
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 26, 2010 at 5:01 pm

Firstly, there are numerous errors in Litebug's posting which leads to a loss of credibility.

I grew up in Palo Alto, left and moved back 3 years ago, barely being able to afford a small house in North Palo Alto (we wanted Paly attendance area). For the most part, people here are still the same - modest and intellectual. Sure, there are some bad apples who have attained success and feel it's okay to be rude. But mostly, people in Palo Alto are friendly and modest. I think many of the snobby, pushy shoppers at Stanford are not Palo Altans.


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Posted by litebug
a resident of another community
on Jul 26, 2010 at 5:16 pm

Native, I see a charge of "numerous errors" so severe that my "credibility" is questioned! And what do you offer as evidence? Merely a different experience of living in Palo Alto. As a result, I find your post personally offensive.


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Posted by Josh
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 26, 2010 at 10:57 pm

To "Native" -

I'm curious as to why you wrote above that you wanted the Paly (high school) attendance area when you move back. What do you see as the differences between Paly and Gunn? Both are fine and highly regarded. I'm thinking about buying and I would like to know if I need to factor in something I might be missing.


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Posted by Jack
a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis
on Jul 27, 2010 at 1:05 am

Gunn seems to be in the outskirts of Palo Alto, across from a cemetery and is seemingly build below grade. To someone like me, it seems to be a depressing location in the middle of nowhere, it would make me feel sad and claustrophobic to spend time there. On the other hand, Paly is in a vibrant part of town across from the shopping center and Stanford University. I am one of those people who needs daylight and liveliness. I apologize in advance if this posting offends Gunn admirers, it is one of the top schools in the country, I am simply talking about the location and the effect it would have on someone with my issues.


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Posted by Kevin
a resident of Another Palo Alto neighborhood
on Jul 27, 2010 at 1:21 am

Josh,

Here is a link with links within re your question: Web Link


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Posted by BookLover
a resident of Old Palo Alto
on Jul 27, 2010 at 1:09 pm

To Pat:

"It's absurd to have 5 libraries for 60,000 people. There are better places to donate your money."

You're absolutely right, it is absurd. BUT until the citizens of Palo Alto allow the Library to close branches (which they have so far refused to allow) then how about putting your money (those who want multiple branches) where your mouth is and pony up with some help.

The library is a disgrace for a town with so much interest in education and children.


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Posted by My bathroom is my library !!
a resident of College Terrace
on Jul 28, 2010 at 5:16 am


There is no need for "Stupid Rundown PA Libraries". My iPad is my library. I can afford all the books I really need, also I have all the magazines I need that PA libraries will never have! I can read all my books even in the comfort of my toilet seat.

I am investing in a bathroom remodel, no donations for a dysfunctional libraries !!







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Posted by Palo Alto values
a resident of Palo Alto High School
on Jul 28, 2010 at 10:06 am

I was a student at Gunn and parent at Paly and found Gunn MUCH nicer than Paly. I had a suprise. Striking how different the two schools are in all regards. Just my opinion.


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Posted by Gene786
a resident of Midtown
on Jul 28, 2010 at 5:26 pm

Grandma/Hard to believe

The really large earners do not by themselves skew the "median" income, which is the income at which half the population are above and half are below.

Example 2 Palo Altans (or is Palo Altoans?) make $10,000 per year 1 Palo Altan makes $11,000 per year and 1 Palo Altan makes $100,000 per year. The median income is $10,500.

I would speculate that we may be higher in median income than Atherton because the wealthy own larger pieces of property and the lower income population are more numerous in what's left over. Just a guess.


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